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Charaton
Charaton (Olympiodorus of Thebes: Χαράτων) was one of the first kings of the Huns. In end of 412 or beginning of 413, Charaton received the Byzantine ambassador Olympiodorus sent by Honorius.[1] Olympiodorus travelled to Charaton’s kingdom by sea, but does not record whether the sea in question was the Black or Adriatic. As the History deals exclusively with the Western Roman Empire, it was probably Adriatic, and visited them somewhere in Pannonian Basin.[2] Olympiodorus recounts;"Donatus and the Huns, and the skillfulness of their kings in shooting with the bow. The author relates that he himself was sent on a mission to them and Donatus, and gives a tragic account of his wanderings and perils by the sea. How Donatus, being deceived by an oath, was unlawfully put to death
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Ottoman Turkish Language
Ottoman Turkish (/ˈɒtəmən/; Turkish: Osmanlı Türkçesi), or the Ottoman language (Ottoman Turkish: لسان عثمانى‎, lisân-ı Osmânî, also known as تركجه‎, Türkçe or تركی‎, Türkî, "Turkish"; Turkish: Osmanlıca), is the variety of the Turkish language
Turkish language
that was used in the Ottoman Empire. It borrows, in all aspects, extensively from Arabic
Arabic
and Persian, and it was written in the Ottoman Turkish alphabet
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Altaic Languages
Altaic (/ælˈteɪ.ɪk/) is a proposed language family of central Eurasia and Siberia, now widely seen as discredited.[1][2][3][4] The Turkic, Mongolic and Tungusic groups are invariably included in the family; some authors added Korean and Japonic languages.[5] These languages are spoken in a wide arc stretching from eastern Europe, through Central Asia
Central Asia
to Anatolia
Anatolia
and to the Korean Peninsula
Korean Peninsula
and Japanese archipelago
Japanese archipelago
in East Asia.[6] The group is named after the Altai mountain range in Central Asia. This view was widespread prior to the 1960s but has almost no supporters among specialists today.[7] The expanded grouping, including Korean and sometimes Japanese, came to be known as "Macro-Altaic", leading to the designation of the smaller grouping as "Micro-Altaic" by retronymy
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Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute
The Ukrainian Research Institute at Harvard University, commonly known as the Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute
Harvard Ukrainian Research Institute
(HURI), is a research institute affiliated with Harvard University
Harvard University
devoted to Ukrainian studies, including the history, culture, language, literature, and politics of Ukraine. Other areas of study include sociology, archaeology, art, economics, and anthropology. Faculty at the Institute include the three endowed professorships in Ukrainian studies, which are in the Department of History and the Department of Slavic Languages and Literatures; these are supplemented by other Harvard faculty as well as visiting scholars. HURI was formally founded in 1973 by Omeljan Pritsak and other leading scholars in Ukrainian studies. It functions as a focal point for undergraduate and graduate students, fellows, and professors and provides assistance with their research
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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International Standard Book Number
"ISBN" redirects here. For other uses, see ISBN (other).International Standard Book
Book
NumberA 13-digit ISBN, 978-3-16-148410-0, as represented by an EAN-13 bar codeAcronym ISBNIntroduced 1970; 48 years ago (1970)Managing organisation International ISBN AgencyNo. of digits 13 (formerly 10)Check digit Weighted sumExample 978-3-16-148410-0Website www.isbn-international.orgThe International Standard Book
Book
Number (ISBN) is a unique[a][b] numeric commercial book identifier. Publishers purchase ISBNs from an affiliate of the International ISBN Agency.[1] An ISBN is assigned to each edition and variation (except reprintings) of a book. For example, an e-book, a paperback and a hardcover edition of the same book would each have a different ISBN. The ISBN is 13 digits long if assigned on or after 1 January 2007, and 10 digits long if assigned before 2007
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University Of California Press
University of California
University of California
Press, otherwise known as UC Press, is a publishing house associated with the University of California
University of California
that engages in academic publishing. It was founded in 1893[2] to publish books and papers for the faculty of the University of California, established 25 years earlier in 1868. Its headquarters are located in Oakland, California. The University of California
University of California
Press currently publishes in the following general subject areas: anthropology, art, ancient world/classical studies, California
California
and the West, cinema & media studies, criminology, environmental studies, food and wine, history, music, politics, psychology, public health and medicine, religion, and sociology. It is a non-profit publishing arm of the University of California
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Otto J. Maenchen-Helfen
Otto John Maenchen-Helfen (in German: Otto Mänchen-Helfen) (July 26, 1894 in Vienna, Austria
Austria
– January 29, 1969 in Berkeley, California) was an Austrian academic, sinologist, historian, author, and traveler. From 1927 to 1930 he worked at the Marx-Engels Institute in Moscow, and from 1930 to 1933 in Berlin. When the Nazis came to power in Germany, he returned to Austria, and after the Anschluss
Anschluss
in 1938 he emigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He was the author of several oft-cited books, including a history of the Huns. He was the first non Russian to travel and report on Tannu Tuva. He obtained permission to travel there and study its inhabitants in 1929[1] He later published his experiences in a book, Reise ins asiatische Tuwa (Travels in Asiatic Tuva). Selected list of works[edit]Mänchen-Helfen, Otto (1931). Reise ins asiatische Tuwa
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Huns
The Huns
Huns
were a nomadic people who lived in Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, and Central Asia
Central Asia
between the 4th and 6th century AD. According to European tradition, they were first reported living east of the Volga River, in an area that
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Saka Language
Pontic SteppeDomestication of the horse Kurgan Kurgan
Kurgan
culture Steppe culturesBug-Dniester Sredny Stog Dnieper-Donets Samara Khvalynsk YamnaMikhaylovka cultureCaucasusMaykopEast-AsiaAfanasevoEastern EuropeUsatovo Cernavodă CucuteniNorthern EuropeCorded wareBaden Middle DnieperBronze AgePontic SteppeChariot Yamna Catacomb Multi-cordoned ware Poltavka SrubnaNorthern/Eastern SteppeAbashevo culture Andronovo SintashtaEuropeGlobular Amphora Corded ware Beaker Unetice Trzciniec Nordic Bronze Age Terramare Tumulus
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Omeljan Pritsak
Omeljan Pritsak (Ukrainian: Омеля́н Пріца́к; 7 April 1919, Luka, Sambir County, West Ukrainian People's Republic
West Ukrainian People's Republic
– 29 May 2006, Boston, Massachusetts, U.S.) was the first Mykhailo Hrushevsky Professor of Ukrainian History at Harvard University
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Rugila
Rugila or Ruga (also Ruas; died second half of the 430s AD),[1] was a ruler who was a major factor in the Huns' early victories over the Roman Empire
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Otto Maenchen-Helfen
Otto John Maenchen-Helfen (in German: Otto Mänchen-Helfen) (July 26, 1894 in Vienna, Austria
Austria
– January 29, 1969 in Berkeley, California) was an Austrian academic, sinologist, historian, author, and traveler. From 1927 to 1930 he worked at the Marx-Engels Institute in Moscow, and from 1930 to 1933 in Berlin. When the Nazis came to power in Germany, he returned to Austria, and after the Anschluss
Anschluss
in 1938 he emigrated to the United States, eventually becoming a professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He was the author of several oft-cited books, including a history of the Huns. He was the first non Russian to travel and report on Tannu Tuva. He obtained permission to travel there and study its inhabitants in 1929[1] He later published his experiences in a book, Reise ins asiatische Tuwa (Travels in Asiatic Tuva). Selected list of works[edit]Mänchen-Helfen, Otto (1931). Reise ins asiatische Tuwa
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Franz Altheim
Franz Altheim (6 October 1898 – 17 October 1976) was a German historian, best known for his trip with Erika Trautmann funded by the Ahnenerbe
Ahnenerbe
and Hermann Göring. Early life[edit] Altheim was born to Wilhelm Altheim, an eccentric sculptor of a father, in Frankfurt
Frankfurt
who passed his Bohemian ways onto his son. But after Franz's mother left, his father committed suicide on Christmas Day 1914. In 1917, Altheim joined the German army, became a translator and was then stationed in the Ottoman Empire. Career[edit] Altheim began studying classical philology, archaeology and linguistics, paying for his education with a bank job. After making several annual trips to Italy
Italy
funded by government grants, he became a private lecturer at the University of Frankfurt
Frankfurt
in 1928
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Turkic Languages
The Turkic languages
Turkic languages
are a language family of at least thirty-five[2] documented languages, spoken by the Turkic peoples
Turkic peoples
of Eurasia
Eurasia
from Eastern Europe, the Caucasus, Central Asia, and West Asia
West Asia
all the way to North Asia
North Asia
(particularly in Siberia) and East Asia
East Asia
(including the Far East)
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