HOME TheInfoList.com
Providing Lists of Related Topics to Help You Find Great Stuff
[::MainTopicLength::#1500] [::ListTopicLength::#1000] [::ListLength::#15] [::ListAdRepeat::#3]

picture info

Chalcis
Chalcis
Chalcis
(/ˈkælsɪs/;[3] Ancient Greek & Katharevousa: Χαλκίς, Chalkís) or Chalkida (Modern Greek: Χαλκίδα, [xalˈciða]) is the chief town of the island of Euboea
Euboea
in Greece, situated on the Euripus Strait
Euripus Strait
at its narrowest point
[...More...]

"Chalcis" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Triarchy Of Negroponte
The Triarchy of Negroponte
Triarchy of Negroponte
was a crusader state established on the island of Euboea
Euboea
(Italian: Negroponte) after the partition of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
following the Fourth Crusade. Partitioned into three baronies (terzieri, "thirds") (Chalkis, Karystos
Karystos
and Oreos) run by a few interrelated Lombard families, the island soon fell under the influence of the Republic of Venice
[...More...]

"Triarchy Of Negroponte" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Postal Codes In Greece
Postal may refer to:The Italian name for Burgstall, South Tyrol
Burgstall, South Tyrol
in northern Italy Paul Postal (born 1936), American linguist Postal (video game series), a series of computer games launch
[...More...]

"Postal Codes In Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Achaea (Roman Province)
Achaea[1] or Achaia,[2][3] sometimes transliterated from Greek as Akhaïa (Greek: Αχαΐα Achaïa, [axaˈia]), was a province of the Roman Empire, consisting of the Peloponnese, eastern Central Greece, and parts of Thessaly. In the north, it bordered on the provinces of Epirus vetus
Epirus vetus
and Macedonia. The region was annexed by the Roman Republic in 146 BC following the sack of Corinth
Corinth
by the Roman general Lucius Mummius, who was awarded the cognomen "Achaicus" ("conqueror of Achaea"). It became part of the Roman province
Roman province
of Macedonia, which included the whole of mainland Greece. When Augustus
Augustus
became the first Roman emperor in 27 BC he made an agreement whereby some provinces, the imperial provinces, came under the control of the emperor, who appointed their governors
[...More...]

"Achaea (Roman Province)" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Mithradates VI Of Pontus
Mithridates /ˌmɪθˈrɪdətiːz/ or Mithradates (Old Persian 𐎷𐎡𐎰𐎼𐎭𐎠𐎫 Miθradāta) is the Hellenistic form of an Iranian theophoric name, meaning "given by the deity Mithra". In modern Persian it is called Mehrdad. It may refer to: Rulers[edit] Mithridates I of Parthia
Mithridates I of Parthia
(r. 171–138 BC) Mithridates II of Parthia
Mithridates II of Parthia
(r. 121–91 BC) Mithridates III of Parthia
Mithridates III of Parthia
(r. 58–57 BC) Mithridates IV of Parthia
Mithridates IV of Parthia
(r. 128–147 AD) Mithridates I of Cius (d. 363 BC), also known as Mithridates I of Kios Mithridates II of Cius (r. 337–302 BC), also known as Mithridates II of Kios Mithridates III of Cius, became Mithridates I of Pontus Mithridates I of Pontus (r. c
[...More...]

"Mithradates VI Of Pontus" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Delian League
The Delian League, founded in 478 BC,[1] was an association of Greek city-states, members numbering between 150,[2] 173,[3] to 330 [4] under the leadership of Athens, whose purpose was to continue fighting the Persian Empire
Empire
after the Greek victory in the Battle of Plataea
Battle of Plataea
at the end of the Second Persian invasion of Greece. The League's modern[5] name derives from its official meeting place, the island of Delos, where congresses were held in the temple and where the treasury stood until, in a symbolic gesture,[6] Pericles
Pericles
moved it to Athens in 454 BC.[7] Shortly after its inception, Athens began to use the League's navy for its own purposes – which led to its naming by historians as the Athenian Empire. This behavior frequently led to conflict between Athens and the less powerful members of the League
[...More...]

"Delian League" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Mediterranean
The Mediterranean Sea
Sea
is a sea connected to the Atlantic Ocean, surrounded by the Mediterranean Basin
Mediterranean Basin
and almost completely enclosed by land: on the north by Southern Europe
Southern Europe
and Anatolia, on the south by North Africa
North Africa
and on the east by the Levant. Although the sea is sometimes considered a part of the Atlantic Ocean, it is usually identified as a separate body of water
[...More...]

"Mediterranean" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Purple
Purple
Purple
is a color intermediate between blue and red.[1][2] It is similar to violet, but unlike violet, which is a spectral color with its own wavelength on the visible spectrum of light, purple is a composite color made by combining red and blue.[3] According to surveys in Europe
Europe
and the U.S., purple is the color most often associated with royalty, magic, mystery, and piety.[4] When combined with pink, it is associated with eroticism, femininity, and seduction.[5] Purple
Purple
was the color worn by Roman magistrates; it became the imperial color worn by the rulers of the Byzantine Empire
Byzantine Empire
and the Holy Roman Empire, and later by Roman Catholic
Roman Catholic
bishops
[...More...]

"Purple" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Trojan War
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
[...More...]

"Trojan War" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Iliad
Setting: Troy
Troy
(modern Hisarlik, Turkey) Period: Bronze Age Traditional dating: c. 1194–1184 BC Modern dating: c
[...More...]

"Iliad" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Middle Ages
In the history of Europe, the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
(or Medieval Period) lasted from the 5th to the 15th century. It began with the fall of the Western Roman Empire
Roman Empire
and merged into the Renaissance
Renaissance
and the Age of Discovery. The Middle Ages
Middle Ages
is the middle period of the three traditional divisions of Western history: classical antiquity, the medieval period, and the modern period. The medieval period is itself subdivided into the Early, High, and Late Middle Ages. Population decline, counterurbanisation, invasion, and movement of peoples, which had begun in Late Antiquity, continued in the Early Middle Ages. The large-scale movements of the Migration Period, including various Germanic peoples, formed new kingdoms in what remained of the Western Roman Empire
[...More...]

"Middle Ages" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Bronze
Bronze
Bronze
is an alloy consisting primarily of copper, commonly with about 12% tin and often with the addition of other metals (such as aluminium, manganese, nickel or zinc) and sometimes non-metals or metalloids such as arsenic, phosphorus or silicon. These additions produce a range of alloys that may be harder than copper alone, or have other useful properties, such as stiffness, ductility, or machinability. The archeological period where bronze was the hardest metal in widespread use is known as the Bronze
Bronze
Age. The beginning of the Bronze Age in Western Eurasia
Eurasia
and South Asia
Asia
is conventionally dated to the mid-4th millennium BC, and to the early 2nd millennium BC in China;[1] everywhere it gradually spread across regions
[...More...]

"Bronze" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Greek Language
Greek (Modern Greek: ελληνικά [eliniˈka], elliniká, "Greek", ελληνική γλώσσα [eliniˈci ˈɣlosa] ( listen), ellinikí glóssa, "Greek language") is an independent branch of the Indo-European family of languages, native to Greece
Greece
and other parts of the Eastern Mediterranean
[...More...]

"Greek Language" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

Katharevousa
Katharevousa (Greek: Καθαρεύουσα, pronounced [kaθaˈrevusa], literally "purifying [language]") is a conservative form of the Modern Greek language
Greek language
conceived in the early 19th century as a compromise between Ancient Greek
Ancient Greek
and the Demotic Greek of the time. Originally, it was widely used both for literary and official purposes, though seldom in daily language
[...More...]

"Katharevousa" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo

picture info

Vehicle Registration Plates Of Greece
Greek vehicle registration plates are composed of three letters and four digits per plate (e.g. ΑΑΑ-1000) printed in black on a white background. The letters represent the district (prefecture) that issues the plates while the numbers begin from 1000 to 9999. As from 2004, a blue strip was added on the left showing the country code of Greece
Greece
(GR) in white text and the Flag of Europe. Similar plates with digits beginning from 1 to 999 are issued for motorcycles which exceed 50 cc. With the exception of Athens
Athens
and Thessaloniki, all districts are represented by the first 2 letters. The final letter in the sequence changes in Greek alphabetical order after 9,000 issued plates. For example, Patras
Patras
plates are ΑΧΑ-1000, where Α Χ
Χ
represents the Achaia prefecture of which Patras
Patras
is the capital
[...More...]

"Vehicle Registration Plates Of Greece" on:
Wikipedia
Google
Yahoo
.