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Celia Green
Celia Elizabeth Green (born 26 November 1935) is a British writer on philosophical skepticism and psychology.Contents1 Biography 2 Philosophy2.1 General 2.2 Ethics 2.3 Empirical research 2.4 Aphorisms3 Publications 4 CDs 5 References and notes 6 See also 7 External linksBiography[edit] Green's parents were both primary school teachers, who together authored a series of geography textbooks which became known as The Green Geographies.[1] She was educated first at the Ursuline Convent in Ilford, and later at the Woodford High School for Girls, a state school. In a book, Letters from Exile,[2] she compared these two schools and made conclusions that preferred parentally financed to state education. She won the Senior Open Scholarship to Somerville College, Oxford
Somerville College, Oxford
aged 17. In 1960 she was awarded a B.Litt. degree from Oxford University's faculty of Literae Humaniores (Philosophy), for a thesis, supervised by H. H
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Categorical Imperative
The categorical imperative (German: kategorischer Imperativ) is the central philosophical concept in the deontological moral philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Introduced in Kant's 1785 Groundwork of the Metaphysics of Morals, it may be defined as a way of evaluating motivations for action. According to Kant, human beings occupy a special place in creation, and morality can be summed up in an imperative, or ultimate commandment of reason, from which all duties and obligations derive. He defined an imperative as any proposition declaring a certain action (or inaction) to be necessary. Hypothetical
Hypothetical
imperatives apply to someone who wishes to attain certain ends. For example:If I wish to quench my thirst, I must drink something. If I wish to pass this exam, I must study.A categorical imperative, on the other hand, denotes an absolute, unconditional requirement that must be obeyed in all circumstances and is justified as an end in itself
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Libertarian Alliance
The Libertarian Alliance
Libertarian Alliance
(LA) was a libertarian think tank in the UK, which advocated the abolition of taxation and government intervention in economic and social life.[1] The Libertarian Alliance
Libertarian Alliance
was dissolved in June 2017, and its successor organisation, Mises UK, owns the Libertarian Alliance
Libertarian Alliance
Archives, which "include nearly 800 pamphlets in print and from more than 150 authors".[2]Contents1 Early history 2 After 19822.1 The Tame Libertarian Alliance 2.2 The McDonagh Libertarian Alliance3 ReferencesEarly history[edit] With ancestral ties to the Liberty and Property Defence League of Lord Elcho and Sir Ernest Benn's Society of Individualists, the LA was founded in the 1970s by Mark Brady, Judy Englander, David Ramsay Steele and Chris Tame
Chris Tame
in Woking
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Extra-sensory Perception
Extrasensory perception, ESP or Esper, also called sixth sense or second sight, includes claimed reception of information not gained through the recognized physical senses but sensed with the mind. The term was adopted by Duke University
Duke University
psychologist J. B. Rhine to denote psychic abilities such as intuition, telepathy, psychometry, clairaudience, and clairvoyance, and their trans-temporal operation as precognition or retrocognition.[1] Parapsychology
Parapsychology
is the study of paranormal psychic phenomena, including ESP
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Em
EM, Em or em may refer to:Contents1 Arts and entertainment1.1 Music 1.2 Other uses in arts and entertainment2 Businesses and organizations 3 Language and typography3.1 Language 3.2 Typography4 Management 5 Places 6 Science6.1 Biology 6.2 Computing 6.3 Medicine 6.4 Physics 6.5 Other uses in science and technology7 Other usesArts and entertainment[edit] Music[edit]EM, the E major
E major
musical scale Em, the
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Renée Haynes
Renée Oriana Haynes (23 July 1906 - 1994), also known as Renée Tickell was a British novelist and psychical researcher.[1][2]Contents1 Biography 2 Reception 3 Publications 4 See also 5 ReferencesBiography[edit] Haynes was born in London
London
and attended St Hugh's College, Oxford receiving a BA and majors in law and history. Haynes worked with the British Council as a director of book reviews. She joined the Society for Psychical Research (SPR) in 1946 and edited the society's journal from 1970 to 1981.[1] She was the daughter of E. S. P. Haynes
E. S. P. Haynes
and Oriana Huxley Waller
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Rapid Eye Movement Sleep
Rapid eye movement sleep
Rapid eye movement sleep
(REM sleep, REMS) is a unique phase of sleep in mammals and birds, distinguishable by random/rapid movement of the eyes, accompanied with low muscle tone throughout the body, and the propensity of the sleeper to dream vividly. The REM phase is also known as paradoxical sleep (PS) and sometimes desynchronized sleep because of physiological similarities to waking states, including rapid, low-voltage desynchronized brain waves. Electrical and chemical activity regulating this phase seems to originate in the brain stem and is characterized most notably by an abundance of the neurotransmitter acetylcholine, combined with a nearly complete absence of monoamine neurotransmitters histamine, serotonin, and norepinephrine. REM sleep is physiologically different from the other phases of sleep, which are collectively referred to as non-REM sleep (NREM sleep, NREMS, synchronized sleep)
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Library Of Congress Control Number
The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Control Number (LCCN) is a serially-based system of numbering cataloging records in the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
in the United States. It has nothing to do with the contents of any book, and should not be confused with Library of Congress Classification.Contents1 History 2 Format 3 See also 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] The LCCN numbering system has been in use since 1898, at which time the acronym LCCN originally stood for Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Card Number. It has also been called the Library of Congress
Library of Congress
Catalog Card Number, among other names. The Library of Congress
Library of Congress
prepared cards of bibliographic information for their library catalog and would sell duplicate sets of the cards to other libraries for use in their catalogs
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International Standard Name Identifier
The International Standard Name Identifier (ISNI) is an identifier for uniquely identifying the public identities of contributors to media content such as books, television programmes, and newspaper articles. Such an identifier consists of 16 digits. It can optionally be displayed as divided into four blocks. ISNI can be used to disambiguate names that might otherwise be confused, and links the data about names that are collected and used in all sectors of the media industries. It was developed under the auspices of the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) as Draft International Standard 27729; the valid standard was published on 15 March 2012
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Psychology
Psychology
Psychology
is the science of behavior and mind, including conscious and unconscious phenomena, as well as thought. It is an academic discipline of immense scope and diverse interests that, when taken together, seek an understanding of the emergent properties of brains, and all the variety of epiphenomena they manifest. As a social science it aims to understand individuals and groups by establishing general principles and researching specific cases.[1][2] In this field, a professional practitioner or researcher is called a psychologist and can be classified as a social, behavioral, or cognitive scientist
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Immanuel Kant
Immanuel Kant
Immanuel Kant
(/kænt/;[8] German: [ɪˈmaːnu̯eːl kant]; 22 April 1724 – 12 February 1804) was a German philosopher who is a central figure in modern philosophy.[9] Kant argues that the human mind creates the structure of human experience, that reason is the source of morality, that aesthetics arises from a faculty of disinterested judgment, that space and time are forms of human sensibility, and that the world as it is "in-itself" is independent of humanity's concepts of it. Kant took himself to have effected a "Copernican revolution" in philosophy, akin to Copernicus' reversal of the age-old belief that the sun revolves around the earth
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Paul Tillich
Paul Johannes Tillich (August 20, 1886 – October 22, 1965) was a German-American Christian existentialist philosopher and Lutheran Protestant
Protestant
theologian who is widely regarded as one of the most influential theologians of the twentieth century.[2] Among the general public, he is best known for his works The Courage to Be (1952) and Dynamics of Faith
Faith
(1957), which introduced issues of theology and modern culture to a general readership
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Wittgenstein
Ludwig Josef Johann Wittgenstein
Wittgenstein
(/ˈvɪtɡənˌstaɪn/;[6] German: [ˈvɪtgənˌʃtaɪn]; 26 April 1889 – 29 April 1951) was an Austrian-British philosopher who worked primarily in logic, the philosophy of mathematics, the philosophy of mind, and the philosophy of language.[7] From 1929 to 1947, Wittgenstein
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Libertarianism
Libertarianism
Libertarianism
(from Latin: libertas, meaning "freedom") is a collection of political philosophies and movements that uphold liberty as a core principle.[1] Libertarians seek to maximize political freedom and autonomy, emphasizing freedom of choice, voluntary association, and individual judgment; they believe in individual rights.[2][3][4] Libertarians share a skepticism of authority and state power, but they diverge on the scope of their opposition to existing political and economic systems
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Epigram
An epigram is a brief, interesting, memorable, and sometimes surprising or satirical statement. The word is derived from the Greek: ἐπίγραμμα epigramma "inscription" from ἐπιγράφειν epigraphein "to write on, to inscribe",[1] and the literary device has been employed for over two millennia. The presence of wit or sarcasm tends to distinguish non-poetic epigrams from aphorisms and adages, which may lack them.Contents1 Ancient Greek 2 Ancient Roman 3 English 4 Poetic 5 See also 6 Notes 7 External linksAncient Greek[edit] The Greek tradition of epigrams began as poems inscribed on votive offerings at sanctuaries – including statues of athletes – and on funerary monuments, for example "Go tell it to the Spartans, passersby...". These original epigrams did the same job as a short prose text might have done, but in verse
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Hans Eysenck
Hans Jürgen Eysenck, PhD, DSc (/ˈaɪzɛŋk/; 4 March 1916 – 4 September 1997) was a German-born English psychologist who spent his professional career in Great Britain
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