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Beatification
Beatification
Beatification
(from Latin
Latin
beatus, "blessed" and facere, "to make") is a recognition accorded by the
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Folk Catholicism
Folk Catholicism
Catholicism
is any of various ethnic expressions of Catholicism as practiced in Catholic communities, typically in developing nations. Practices identified by outside observers as "folk Catholicism" vary from place to place and sometimes contradict the official teachings and practices of the Roman Catholic Church. How “folk” is defined will influence whether the expression of Catholicism
Catholicism
in a given area is defined as Folk Catholicism. In general, when aspects of folk religion intermingle with Catholic beliefs in an area Folk Catholicism
Catholicism
will result. [1]Contents1 Description 2 See also 3 References 4 SourcesDescription[edit] Some forms of folk Catholic practices are based on syncretism with non-Catholic beliefs and may involve the syncretism of Catholic saints and non-Christian deities
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New Advent
New Advent
New Advent
is a website that provides online versions of various works connected with the Catholic Church.Contents1 History 2 Contents 3 References 4 External linksHistory[edit] In 1993, Kevin Knight, then a 26-year-old resident of Denver, Colorado, was inspired, during the visit of Pope John Paul II
Pope John Paul II
to that city for World Youth Day, to launch a project to publish the 1913 edition of the 1907–1912 Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
on the Internet. Knight founded the website New Advent
New Advent
to house the undertaking. Volunteers from the United States, Canada, France
France
and Brazil
Brazil
helped in the transcription of the original material
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St. Peter's Basilica
The Papal Basilica
Basilica
of St. Peter
St. Peter
in the Vatican (Italian: Basilica Papale di San Pietro in Vaticano), or simply St. Peter's Basilica (Latin: Basilica
Basilica
Sancti Petri), is an Italian Renaissance
Italian Renaissance
church in Vatican City, the papal enclave within the city of Rome. Designed principally by Donato Bramante, Michelangelo, Carlo Maderno and Gian Lorenzo Bernini, St. Peter's is the most renowned work of Renaissance architecture[2] and the largest church in the world.[3] While it is neither the mother church of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
nor the cathedral of the Diocese
Diocese
of Rome, St. Peter's is regarded as one of the holiest Catholic shrines
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Birmingham
Birmingham
Birmingham
(/ˈbɜːrmɪŋəm/ ( listen),[3] locally /ˈbɜːmɪŋ(ɡ)əm/ or /ˈbɜːmɪnəm/) is a city and metropolitan borough in the West Midlands of England, standing on the River Rea
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Relic
In religion, a relic usually consists of the physical remains of a saint or the personal effects of the saint or venerated person preserved for purposes of veneration as a tangible memorial. Relics are an important aspect of some forms of Buddhism, Christianity, Islam, Hinduism, Shamanism, and many other religions. Relic
Relic
derives from the Latin
Latin
reliquiae, meaning "remains", and a form of the Latin verb relinquere, to "leave behind, or abandon"
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Hagiography
A hagiography (/ˌhæɡiˈɒɡrəfi/; from Greek ἅγιος, hagios, meaning 'holy', and -γραφία, -graphia, meaning 'writing')[1] is a biography of a saint or an ecclesiastical leader. The term hagiography may be used to refer to the biography of a saint or highly developed spiritual being in any of the world's spiritual traditions. Christian
Christian
hagiographies focus on the lives, and notably the miracles, ascribed to men and women canonized by the Roman Catholic church, the Eastern Orthodox Church, the Oriental Orthodox churches, and the Church of the East
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Vatican City
Vatican City
City
(/ˈvætɪkən ˈsɪti/ ( listen); Italian: Città del Vaticano [tʃitˈta del vatiˈkaːno]; Latin: Civitas Vaticana),[d] officially Vatican City
City
State or State of Vatican City (Italian: Stato della Città del Vaticano;[e] Latin: Status Civitatis Vaticanae),[f] is an independent state located within the city of Rome. With an area of 44 hectares (110 acres), and a population of about 1,000,[3] it is the smallest state in the world by both area and population. However, formally it is not sovereign, with sovereignty being held by the Holy See. It is an ecclesiastical[3] or sacerdotal-monarchical[7] state (a type of theocracy) ruled by the Bishop of Rome
Rome
– the Pope. The highest state functionaries are all Catholic clergy of various national origins
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Lists Of Venerable People
The Venerable
The Venerable
is used as a style or epithet in several Christian churches
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Pope Sixtus V
Pope
Pope
Sixtus V or Xystus V (13 December 1521 – 27 August 1590), born Felice Peretti di Montalto, was Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
from 24 April 1585 to his death in 1590. As a youth, he joined the Franciscan order, where he displayed talents as a scholar and preacher, and enjoyed the patronage of Pius V, who made him a cardinal. As Pope, he energetically rooted out corruption and lawlessness across Rome, and launched a far-sighted rebuilding programme that continues to provoke controversy, as it involved the destruction of antiquities. The cost of these works was met by heavy taxation that caused much suffering. His foreign policy was regarded as over-ambitious, and he excommunicated both Elizabeth I of England
Elizabeth I of England
and Henry IV of France
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Pope Benedict XIV
Pope
Pope
Benedict XIV (Latin: Benedictus XIV; 31 March 1675 – 3 May 1758), born Prospero Lorenzo Lambertini, served as the Pope
Pope
of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
from 17 August 1740 to his death in 1758.[note 1] Perhaps one of the greatest scholars in Christendom, yet often overlooked, he promoted scientific learning, the baroque arts, reinvigoration of Thomism, and the study of the human form. Firmly established with great devotion and adherence to the Council of Trent and authentic Catholic teaching, Benedict removed changes previously made to the Breviary, sought peacefully to reverse growing secularism in certain European courts, invigorated ceremonies with great pomp, and throughout his life and his reign, published numerous theological treatises. In terms of the governance of the Papal States, he reduced taxation and also encouraged agriculture. He also supported free trade
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Archdiocese Of Cologne
The Archdiocese
Archdiocese
of Cologne
Cologne
(Latin: Archidioecesis Coloniensis; German: Erzbistum Köln) is an archdiocese of the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
in western North Rhine-Westphalia
North Rhine-Westphalia
and northern Rhineland-Palatinate
Rhineland-Palatinate
in Germany.Contents1 History 2 Finances 3 List of archbishops of Cologne
Cologne
since 1824 4 References 5 External linksHistory[edit] Cologne
Cologne
CathedralThe Electorate of Cologne—not to be confused with the larger Archdiocese
Archdiocese
of Cologne—was one of the major ecclesiastical principalities of the Holy Roman Empire
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Diocese
The word diocese (/ˈdaɪəsɪs, -siːs, -siːz/)[a] is derived from the Greek term διοίκησις meaning "administration". When now used in an ecclesiastical sense, it refers to an administrative territorial entity.[2] In the Western Church, the district is under the supervision of a bishop (who may have assistant bishops to help him or her) and is divided into parishes under the care of priests; but in the Eastern Church, the word denotes the area under the jurisdiction of a patriarch and the bishops under his jurisdiction administer parishes.[2] This structure of church governance is known as episcopal polity. The word diocesan means relating or pertaining to a diocese. It can also be used as a noun meaning the bishop who has the principal supervision of a diocese
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Catholic Encyclopedia
The Catholic Encyclopedia: An International Work of Reference on the Constitution, Doctrine, Discipline, and History of the Catholic Church,[1] also referred to as the Old Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
and the Original Catholic Encyclopedia,[2] is an English-language encyclopedia published in the United States and designed to serve the Roman Catholic Church. The first volume appeared in March 1907 and the last three volumes appeared in 1912, followed by a master index volume in 1914 and later supplementary volumes. It was designed "to give its readers full and authoritative information on the entire cycle of Catholic interests, action and doctrine".[3][4] The Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
was published by the Robert Appleton Company (RAC), a publishing company incorporated at New York in February 1905 for the express purpose of publishing the encyclopedia
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Calendar Of Saints
The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".[1] The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin
Latin
as the martyr's dies natalis ("day of birth")
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Feast Day
The calendar of saints is a traditional Christian method of organizing a liturgical year by associating each day with one or more saints and referring to the day as the feast day or feast of said saint. The word "feast" in this context does not mean "a large meal, typically a celebratory one", but instead "an annual religious celebration, a day dedicated to a particular saint".[1] The system arose from the early Christian custom of commemorating each martyr annually on the date of his or her death, or birth into heaven, a date therefore referred to in Latin
Latin
as the martyr's dies natalis ("day of birth")
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