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Baden Thaler
The Thaler
Thaler
was a coin issued by Baden
Baden
at various times. Before 1821, Baden
Baden
issued Kronenthaler
Kronenthaler
and Conventionsthaler. In 1829, a new Thaler
Thaler
was introduced, subdivided into 100 Kreuzer. It replaced the Gulden (worth 60 Kreuzer) as the chief unit of account. A silver Thaler
Thaler
coin was issued, containing ​5⁄147 of a Cologne mark of silver, together with a gold 5 Thaler
Thaler
coin. In 1837, the Gulden replaced the Thaler
Thaler
at a rate of 1 Gulden = 0.6 Thaler
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Baden
Baden
Baden
is a historical German territory. Together with Württemberg
Württemberg
and the former Prussian province of Hohenzollern, two other historical territories, it currently[timeframe?] forms the Federal State of Baden-Württemberg.[1] History[edit] Following the dissolution of the old Duchy of Swabia, Baden
Baden
underwent a history which can be summarized as follows: Margraviate of Baden
Margraviate of Baden
(1112–1806) Electorate of Baden
Electorate of Baden
(1803–1806) Grand Duchy of Baden
Grand Duchy of Baden
(1806–1918) Republic of Baden
Republic of Baden
(1918–1945)After World War II this territory was subdivided between Württemberg-Baden
Württemberg-Baden
and Baden
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Norwegian Rigsdaler
The rigsdaler was the unit of currency used in Norway
Norway
until 1816 and in Denmark
Denmark
until 1873. The similarly named Reichsthaler, riksdaler and rijksdaalder were used in Germany
Germany
and Austria-Hungary, Sweden
Sweden
and the Netherlands, respectively.Contents1 History 2 Coins 3 Banknotes 4 Norwegian speciedaler4.1 Coins 4.2 Banknotes5 ReferencesHistory[edit] During the political union between Denmark
Denmark
and Norway, Danish currency circulated alongside Norwegian
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Greenlandic Rigsdaler
The rigsdaler was the currency of Greenland
Greenland
until 1874. It was equal to the Danish rigsdaler
Danish rigsdaler
which circulated in Greenland
Greenland
alongside distinct banknotes from 1803.Contents1 History 2 Banknotes 3 See also 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] Before 1813, the rigsdaler courant was subdivided into 96 skilling. In 1813, the rigsdaler courant was replaced by the rigsbanksdaler at a rate of 6 rigsdaler courant = 1 rigsbanksdaler, with the rigsbanksdaler subdivided into 96 rigsbank skilling. In 1854, the names were changed to the rigsdaler and skilling rigsmønt. In 1874, the kroner was introduced, at a rate of 2 kroner = 1 rigsdaler
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Dutch Rijksdaalder
The rijksdaalder (Dutch, "dollar of the realm") was a Dutch coin first issued by the Republic of the Seven United Netherlands
Netherlands
in the late 16th century during the Dutch Revolt. Featuring an armored half bust of William the Silent, rijksdaalder was minted to the Saxon reichsthaler weight standard – 448 grains of .885 fine silver.[1] Friesland, Gelderland, Holland, Kampen, Overijssel, Utrecht, West Friesland, Zeeland, and Zwolle
Zwolle
minted armored half bust rijksdaalders until the end of the 17th century. 17th century rijksdaalder was set to be equal to from 48 to 50 stuivers (the Dutch equivalent of shillings) and circulated along with silver florins (28 stuivers), daalders (30 stuivers), leeuwendaalders (36 to 42 stuivers), silver ducats (48 stuivers), and ducatons (60 stuivers)
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Danish West Indian Rigsdaler
The rigsdaler was the currency of the Danish West Indies
Danish West Indies
(now the U.S. Virgin Islands) until 1849. It was subdivided into 96 skilling. The rigsdaler was equal to ​4⁄5 Danish rigsdaler. The rigsdaler was replaced by the daler.Contents1 Coins 2 Banknotes 3 References 4 External linksCoins[edit] In 1766 and 1767, 6, 12 and 24 skilling coins were struck in silver for the Danish West Indies. These were followed in 1816 by silver 2, 10 and 20 skilling coins, which were struck until 1848. All the coins carried the wording "Dansk Amerik(ansk) M(ynt)" (Danish American Coinage) to distinguish them from regular Danish coins. Banknotes[edit] In 1784 and 1785, some Danish 5 rigsdaler courant notes were reissued for use in the West Indies with new denomination of ​6 1⁄4 rigsdaler printed on the previously blank reverses. Regular issues began in 1788 with denominations of 20, 50 and 100 rigsdaler
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Danish West Indian Daler
The daler (Danish, plural the same or dalere, English: dollar) was the currency of the Danish West Indies
Danish West Indies
between 1849 and 1917, and of the United States Virgin Islands
United States Virgin Islands
between 1917 and 1934.[1]Contents1 History 2 Coins 3 Banknotes 4 Notes 5 References 6 External linksHistory[edit]Christian IX of DenmarkCHRISTIAN IX • 1904 • DANSK VESTINDIEN. Bare head left. 50 FR ANCS Half draped female by Viking ship. In exergue 10 DALERThe 1904 50 Francs (10 Daler) gold coin (on average) contains 16.129 grams of gold (0.9000 fine) and weighs 0.4667 ounces.[2] Only 2,005 were struck.[2]The daler replaced the rigsdaler in 1849. No subdivisions were issued until 1859, although a variety of coins were countermarked for use on the islands. In 1859, coins denominated in cents were introduced, with 100 cents = 1 daler. In 1904, two new denominations were introduced, the bit and franc
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Danish Rigsdaler
The rigsdaler was the name of several currencies used in Denmark
Denmark
until 1875.[2] The similarly named Reichsthaler, riksdaler and rijksdaalder were used in Germany
Germany
and Austria-Hungary, Sweden
Sweden
and the Netherlands, respectively. These currencies were often anglicized as rix-dollar[3] or rixdollar.Contents1 History 2 Coins 3 Banknotes 4 See also 5 Notes 6 References6.1 Citations 6.2 Bibliography7 External linksHistory[edit]Silver two-rigsdaler coin, with the head of Christian IX, dating from 1868Reverse of the aboveThe Danish currency system established in 1625 consisted of 12 penning = 1 skilling, 16 skilling = 1 mark, 6 mark = 1 rigsdaler and 8 mark = 1 krone.[1] From 1713, two separate systems coexisted, courant and species, with courant being a debased currency also used for banknote issue
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Norwegian Speciedaler
The rigsdaler was the unit of currency used in Norway
Norway
until 1816 and in Denmark
Denmark
until 1873. The similarly named Reichsthaler, riksdaler and rijksdaalder were used in Germany
Germany
and Austria-Hungary, Sweden
Sweden
and the Netherlands, respectively.Contents1 History 2 Coins 3 Banknotes 4 Norwegian speciedaler4.1 Coins 4.2 Banknotes5 ReferencesHistory[edit] During the political union between Denmark
Denmark
and Norway, Danish currency circulated alongside Norwegian
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Dollar
Dollar
Dollar
(often represented by the dollar sign $) is the name of more than twenty currencies, including those of Australia, Canada, Hong Kong, Jamaica, Liberia, Namibia, New Zealand, Singapore, Taiwan, and the United States. The U.S. dollar is the official currency of East Timor, Ecuador, El Salvador, the Federated States of Micronesia, the Marshall Islands, Palau, the Caribbean Netherlands, U.S. territories such as Puerto Rico, American Samoa
American Samoa
and the United States
United States
Virgin Islands and for banknotes, Panama. Generally, one dollar is divided into one hundred cents.  Countries that use the US dollar   Countries that use a different dollar currency   Countries that formerly used a dollar currencyA United States
United States
two-dollar bill. Rarely seen in circulation, but still in production and legal tender
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Special
Special
Special
or specials may refer to:Contents1 Music 2 Film and television 3 Other uses 4 See alsoMusic[edit] Special
Special
(album), a 1992 album by Vesta Williams "Special" (Garbage song), 1998 "Special
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Currency
A currency (from Middle English: curraunt, "in circulation", from Latin: currens, -entis), in the most specific use of the word, refers to money in any form when in actual use or circulation as a medium of exchange, especially circulating banknotes and coins.[1][2] A more general definition is that a currency is a system of money (monetary units) in common use, especially in a nation.[3] Under this definition, US dollars, British pounds, Australian dollars, and European euros are examples of currency. These various currencies are recognized stores of value and are traded between nations in foreign exchange markets, which determine the relative values of the different currencies.[4] Currencies in this sense are defined by governments, and each type has limited boundaries of acceptance. Other definitions of the term "currency" are discussed in their respective synonymous articles banknote, coin, and money
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History Of Germany
The concept of Germany
Germany
as a distinct region in central Europe can be traced to Roman commander Julius Caesar, who referred to the unconquered area east of the Rhine
Rhine
as Germania, thus distinguishing it from Gaul
Gaul
(France), which he had conquered. The victory of the Germanic tribes in the Battle of the Teutoburg Forest
Battle of the Teutoburg Forest
(AD 9) prevented annexation by the Roman Empire, although the Roman provinces
Roman provinces
of Germania
Germania
Superior and Germania
Germania
Inferior were established along the Rhine. Following the Fall of the Western Roman Empire, the Franks conquered the other West Germanic tribes. When the Frankish Empire
Frankish Empire
was divided among Charlemagne's heirs in 843, the eastern part became East Francia
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Cologne Mark
The Cologne Mark was a unit of weight equivalent to 233.856 grams (about 3,609 grains). It came to be used as the base unit for a number of currency standards, including the Lübeck monetary system, which was important in northern Europe in the late Middle Ages, and the coinage systems of the Holy Roman Empire, most significantly the conventionsthaler, which was defined as one tenth of a Cologne Mark. The Mark was defined as half a Pfund (pound) with 16 Unze (ounces) to the Pfund. The Unze was subdivided into 2 Lot, 8 Quentchen, 32 Pfennig or 36 Gran, with the Gran equal to 0.812 grams. See also[edit]ReichsmünzordnungExternal links[edit]Eighteenth Century WeightsThis standards- or measurement-related article is a stub. You can help by expanding it.v t eThis European history–related article is a stub
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Kreuzer
The Kreuzer
Kreuzer
(German: [ˈkʀɔɪtsɐ] ( listen)), in English usually kreutzer,[1] was a silver coin and unit of currency existing in the southern German states prior to the unification of Germany, and in Austria. After 1760 it was made of copper.[2]Contents1 Early history 2 Conventionsmünze 3 South Germany 1837–1873 4 Austria-Hungary
Austria-Hungary
1857–1892 5 References 6 External linksEarly history[edit] In 1559 a value of 60 Kreuzer
Kreuzer
to 1 gulden had been adopted throughout the Southern states of the Holy Roman Empire, but the northern German states declined to join, and used Groschen
Groschen
instead of Kreuzer. The Kreuzer
Kreuzer
in turn was worth about 4.2 Pfennig, or pennies. Thus one (golden) Gulden was worth 60 Kreuzer, or 252 Pfennig
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Baden Gulden
The Gulden was a currency of Baden
Baden
from 1754 until 1873. Until 1821, the Gulden was a unit of account, worth ​5⁄12 of a Conventionsthaler, used to denominate banknotes but not issued as a coin. It was subdivided into 50 Conventionskreuzer or 60 Kreuzer landmünze. In 1821, the first Gulden coins were issued, equal to the previous Gulden and subdivided into 60 Kreuzer. Between 1829 and 1837, the Thaler was the currency of Baden, worth 100 Kreuzer. In 1837, Baden
Baden
joined the South German Monetary Union and readopted the Gulden as its currency, again worth 60 Kreuzer
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