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Avallon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. AVALLON (French pronunciation: ​ ) is a commune in the Yonne department in Bourgogne-Franche-Comté in central-eastern France
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Historia Regum Britanniae
HISTORIA REGUM BRITANNIAE (The History of the Kings of Britain), originally called DE GESTIS BRITONUM (On the Deeds of the Britons), is a pseudohistorical account of British history, written around 1136 by Geoffrey of Monmouth
Geoffrey of Monmouth
. It chronicles the lives of the kings of the Britons over the course of two thousand years, beginning with the Trojans founding the British nation and continuing until the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
assumed control of much of Britain around the 7th century. It is one of the central pieces of the Matter of Britain
Matter of Britain
. Although credited uncritically well into the 16th century, it is now considered to have no value as history. When events described, such as Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
's invasions of Britain , can be corroborated from contemporary histories, Geoffrey's account can be seen to be wildly inaccurate
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Déols
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km² (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting : residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. DéOLS is a commune in the department of Indre in the Centre-Val de Loire Region of central France . Déols is an ancient town with a famous Benedictine abbey, Abbaye Notre-Dame-du-Bourg-Dieu. Today it is somewhat overshadowed by the nearby city of Châteauroux , which faces it across the river Indre . It preserves a fine Romanesque tower and other remains of the abbey church, once the most important in the duchy of Berry
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Euric
EURIC (Gothic : Aiwareiks), also known as EVARIC, or EURICO in Spanish and Portuguese (c. 440 – 28 December 484), son of Theodoric I , he ruled as king (rex) of the Visigoths , after murdering his brother, Theodoric II , from 466 until his death in 484. Sometimes he is called Euric II. With his capital at Toulouse , Euric inherited a large portion of the Visigothic possessions in the Aquitaine region of Gaul , an area that had been under Visigothic control since 415. Over the decades the Visigoths had gradually expanded their holdings at the expense of the weak Roman government, including Euric's sieges of Clermont in 475 and 476, as well as advancing well into Hispania in the process. Upon becoming king, Euric defeated several other Visigothic kings and chieftains in a series of civil wars and soon became the first ruler of a truly unified Visigothic nation
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Visigoths
The VISIGOTHS (UK : /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɒθs/ ; US : /ˈvɪzɪˌɡɑːθs/ ; Latin : Visigothi, Wisigothi, Vesi, Visi, Wesi, or Wisi; Italian : Visigoti) were the western branches of the nomadic tribes of Germanic peoples referred to collectively as the Goths
Goths
. These tribes flourished and spread throughout the late Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in Late Antiquity , or what is known as the Migration Period
Migration Period
. The Visigoths emerged from earlier Gothic groups (possibly the Thervingi ) who had invaded the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
beginning in 376 and had defeated the Romans at the Battle of Adrianople in 378. Relations between the Romans and the Visigoths
Visigoths
were variable, alternately warring with one another and making treaties when convenient
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Romano-British
ROMANO-BRITISH CULTURE is the culture that arose in Britain under the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
following the Roman conquest in AD 43 and the creation of the province of Britannia
Britannia
. It arose as a fusion of the imported Roman culture with that of the indigenous Britons , a people of Celtic language and custom. It survived the 5th century Roman departure from Britain . Scholars such as Christopher Snyder believe that during the 5th and 6th centuries – approximately from AD 410 when the Roman legions withdrew, to AD 597 when St Augustine of Canterbury
Augustine of Canterbury
arrived – southern Britain preserved an active sub- Roman culture that survived the attacks from the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
and even used a vernacular Latin when writing
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Geoffrey Ashe
GEOFFREY THOMAS LESLIE ASHE MBE FRSL (born 29 March 1923) is a British cultural historian, lecturer, and author of historical books and novels, known for his focus on King Arthur . CONTENTS * 1 Early life * 2 Work * 3 References * 4 External links EARLY LIFEBorn in London, Ashe spent several years in Canada. He graduated from the University of British Columbia , Vancouver, before continuing at Cambridge . WORKMany of his historical books are centred on factual analysis of the Arthurian legend , and the archaeological past of King Arthur , beginning with his King Arthur's Avalon: The Story of Glastonbury, in 1957. The book was inspired by what Ashe had read in G. K. Chesterton 's Short History of England. He is a major proponent of the theory that the historical King Arthur was Riothamus , presented in an article in Speculum , April 1981, and expanded in The Discovery of King Arthur (1985), The Landscape of King Arthur (1987), and in various further articles
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Christianization
Anthropology Comparative religion Development Neurotheology / God gene Origins Psychology Prehistoric Ancient Near East · Ancient Egypt · Semitic Indo-European · Vedic Hinduism · Greco -Roman · Celtic · Germanic Axial Age · Vedanta
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Duchy Of Burgundy
The DUCHY OF BURGUNDY (Latin : Ducatus Burgundiae, French : Duché de Bourgogne, Dutch : Hertogdom Bourgondië) emerged in the 9th century as one of the successors of the ancient Kingdom of the Burgundians , which after its conquest in 532 had formed a constituent part of the Frankish Empire . Upon the 9th century partitions, the French remnants of the Burgundian kingdom were demoted to a ducal rank by King Robert II of France
France
in 1004 and in 1032 awarded to his younger son Robert via Salic law – other portions had passed to the Imperial Kingdom of Arles and the County of Burgundy
County of Burgundy
(Franche-Comté)
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Charles The Bold
CHARLES THE BOLD (French : Charles le Téméraire, Dutch : Karel de Stoute, 10 November 1433 – 5 January 1477), baptised CHARLES MARTIN, was Duke of Burgundy from 1467 to 1477. He was the last Duke of Burgundy from the House of Valois and is sometimes also known as CHARLES THE RASH. His early death at the Battle of Nancy at the hands of Swiss mercenaries fighting for René II, Duke of Lorraine , was of great consequence in European history. The Burgundian domains, long wedged between the growing powers of France
France
and the Habsburg
Habsburg
Empire, were divided, but the precise disposition of the vast and disparate territorial possessions involved was disputed among the European powers for centuries
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Arthurian Legend
By century * 10th * 11th * 12th * 13th * 14th EUROPEAN RENAISSANCE * 15th century Literature portal * v * t * e Part of a series on CELTIC MYTHOLOGY * Polytheism * Deities (list ) * Animism GAELIC MYTHOLOGY * IRISH * SCOTTISH * Tuath Dé * Fomhoraigh * Hebridean mythology and folklore
Hebridean mythology and folklore
* Mythological Cycle
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Western Roman Emperor
The ROMAN EMPEROR was the ruler of the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
during the imperial period (starting in 27 BC). The emperors used a variety of different titles throughout history. Often when a given Roman is described as becoming "emperor" in English, it reflects his taking of the title Augustus
Augustus
or Caesar . Another title often used was imperator , originally a military honorific. Early Emperors also used the title princeps (first citizen). Emperors frequently amassed republican titles, notably Princeps Senatus , Consul and Pontifex Maximus
Pontifex Maximus
. The legitimacy of an emperor's rule depended on his control of the army and recognition by the Senate ; an emperor would normally be proclaimed by his troops, or invested with imperial titles by the Senate, or both
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Anthemius
ANTHEMIUS ( Latin
Latin
: Procopius Anthemius Augustus) (c. 420 – 11 July 472) was Western Roman Emperor
Roman Emperor
from 467 to 472. Perhaps the last capable Western Roman Emperor, Anthemius
Anthemius
attempted to solve the two primary military challenges facing the remains of the Western Roman Empire
Western Roman Empire
: the resurgent Visigoths
Visigoths
, under Euric , whose domain straddled the Pyrenees
Pyrenees
; and the unvanquished Vandals
Vandals
, under Geiseric
Geiseric
, in undisputed control of North Africa. Anthemius
Anthemius
was killed by Ricimer
Ricimer
, his own general of Gothic descent, who contested power with him
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Biscuit
BISCUIT is a term used for a variety of primarily flour-based baked food products. The term is applied to two distinct products in North America and the Commonwealth of Nations and Europe
Europe
. The North American biscuit is typically a soft, leavened quick bread , and is covered in the article Biscuit (bread)
Biscuit (bread)
. This article covers the other type of biscuit, which is typically hard, flat and unleavened
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Gingerbread
GINGERBREAD refers to a broad category of baked goods, typically flavored with ginger , cloves , nutmeg or cinnamon and sweetened with honey , sugar or molasses . Gingerbread
Gingerbread
foods vary, ranging from a soft, moist loaf cake to something close to a ginger biscuit . CONTENTS * 1 Etymology * 2 History * 3 Varieties * 4 See also * 5 References * 6 External links ETYMOLOGY Gingerbread men Gingerbread
Gingerbread
with royal icing Originally, the term gingerbread (from Latin
Latin
zingiber via Old French gingebras) referred to preserved ginger . It then referred to a confection made with honey and spices. Gingerbread
Gingerbread
is often used to translate the French term pain d\'épices (literally "spice bread") or the German term Lebkuchen (The etymology of "Leb" is uncertain
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Pepinster
PEPINSTER is a Walloon municipality of Belgium in Province of Liège . On January 1, 2006, Pepinster had a total population of 9,560. The total area is 24.79 km² which gives a population density of 386 inhabitants per km². Pepinster is situated at the confluence of the rivers Hoëgne and Vesdre . The municipality consists of the following sub-municipalities : Pepinster proper, Cornesse, Soiron, and Wegnez. CONTENTS * 1 Image gallery * 2 See also * 3 References * 4 External links IMAGE GALLERY* Pepinster town hall * The romanesque Christ (11th century)
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