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Avallon
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Avallon
Avallon
(French pronunciation: ​[avalɔ̃]) is a town (French: commune) in the Yonne
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Pepinster
Pepinster is a Walloon municipality of Belgium in Province of Liège. On January 1, 2006, Pepinster had a total population of 9,560. The total area is 24.79 km² which gives a population density of 386 inhabitants per km²
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Geoffrey Ashe
Geoffrey Thomas Leslie Ashe MBE FRSL (born 29 March 1923) is a British cultural historian, lecturer, and author of historical books and novels, known for his focus on King Arthur.[1]Contents1 Early life 2 Work 3 References 4 External linksEarly life[edit] Born in London, Ashe spent several years in Canada. He graduated from the University of British Columbia, Vancouver, before continuing at Cambridge.[2][3] Work[edit] Many of his historical books are centred on factual analysis of the Arthurian legend, and the archaeological past of King Arthur, beginning with his King Arthur's Avalon: The Story of Glastonbury, in 1957. The book was inspired by what Ashe had read in G. K. Chesterton's Short History of England.[2] He is a major proponent of the theory that the historical King Arthur was Riothamus, presented in an article in Speculum, April 1981, and expanded in The Discovery of King Arthur (1985), The Landscape of King Arthur (1987), and in various further articles
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Lyon
Centre: Parc de la Tête d'Or, Confluence district and the Vieux Lyon. Bottom: Pont Lafayette, Part-Dieu district with the Place Bellecour
Place Bellecour
in foreground during Festival of Lights.FlagCoat of armsMotto(s): Avant, avant, Lion le melhor. (Old Franco-Provençal: Forward, forward, Lyon
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Subprefectures In France
In France, a subprefecture (French: sous-préfecture) is the administrative center of a departmental arrondissement that does not contain the prefecture for its department. The term also applies to the building that houses the administrative headquarters for an arrondissement. The civil servant in charge of a subprefecture is the subprefect, assisted by a general secretary
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Minerva
Minerva
Minerva
(/mɪˈnɜːr.və/; Latin: [mɪˈnɛr.wa]; Etruscan: Menrva) was the Roman goddess of wisdom and strategic warfare, although it is noted that the Romans did not stress her relation to battle and warfare as the Greeks would come to, and the sponsor of arts, trade, and strategy
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Christianization
Anthropology Comparative religion Development Neurotheology / God gene Origins PsychologyPrehistoric Ancient Near East  · Ancient Egypt  · Semitic Indo-European  · Vedic Hinduism  · Greco-Roman  · Celtic  · Germanic Axial Age  · Vedanta
Vedanta
 · Shramana  · Dharma
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Duchy Of Burgundy
The Duchy of Burgundy
Burgundy
(Latin: Ducatus Burgundiae; French: Duché de Bourgogne, Dutch: Hertogdom Bourgondië) emerged in the 9th century as one of the successors of the ancient Kingdom of the Burgundians, which after its conquest in 532 had formed a constituent part of the Frankish Empire. Upon the 9th century partitions, the French remnants of the Burgundian kingdom were demoted to a ducal rank by King Robert II of France
France
in 1004 and in 1032 awarded to his younger son Robert via Salic law – other portions had passed to the Imperial Kingdom of Arles and the County of Burgundy
County of Burgundy
(Franche-Comté). Robert became the ancestor of the ducal House of Burgundy, a cadet branch of the royal Capetian dynasty, ruling over a territory which roughly conformed to the borders and territories of the modern region of Burgundy
Burgundy
(Bourgogne)
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Charles The Bold
Charles the Bold
Charles the Bold
(also translated as Charles the Reckless) [1]. (French: Charles le Téméraire, Dutch: Karel de Stoute, 10 November 1433 – 5 January 1477), baptised Charles Martin, was Duke of Burgundy from 1467 to 1477. He was the last Duke of Burgundy
Duke of Burgundy
from the House of Valois. His early death at the Battle of Nancy
Battle of Nancy
at the hands of Swiss mercenaries fighting for René II, Duke of Lorraine, was of great consequence in European history
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Vauban
Maréchal de France Commissaire général des fortifications (1678–1703) Governor of Lille
Lille
(from 1668)Awards Ordre de Saint-LouisSignatureSébastien Le Prestre de Vauban, Seigneur de Vauban and later Marquis de Vauban (1 or 4 May 1633 – 30 March 1707),[1] commonly referred to as Vauban (French: [vobɑ̃]), was a French military engineer who rose in the service to the king and was commissioned as a Marshal of France. Considered the foremost engineer of his time, Vauban is known for his skills both in designing fortifications and breaking through them; his concepts, inspired by Pagan's "Les Fortifications", were the dominant model of fortification and siegecraft for nearly 100 years. He also advised Louis XIV on how to consolidate France's borders in order to make them more defensible
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Arthurian Legend
By century10th 11th 12th 13th 14thEuropean Renaissance15th century Literature portalv t ePart of a series onCeltic mythologyPolytheism Deities (list) AnimismGaelic mythologyIrish ScottishTuath Dé Fomhoraigh Hebridean mythology and folkloreMythological CycleUlster CycleFianna CycleBrythonic mythologyWelsh Breton CornishBritish Iron Age religionMabinogionMatter of BritainTrioedd Ynys PrydeinConceptsOtherworld Champion's portion Geis Imbas forosnai Loathly lady Magic mist Sacred trees Shapeshifting Silver Branch Threefold death Wasteland Well of wisdomReligious vocationsDruids Bards VatesFestivalsSamhain Calan GaeafImbolc Gŵyl FairBeltane Calan MaiLughnasadh Calan AwstCategory
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Romano-British
Romano-British culture
Romano-British culture
is the culture that arose in Britain under the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
following the Roman conquest in AD 43 and the creation of the province of Britannia. It arose as a fusion of the imported Roman culture with that of the indigenous Britons, a people of Celtic language and custom
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Biscuit
Biscuit
Biscuit
is a term used for a variety of primarily flour-based baked food products. The term is applied to two distinct products in North America and the Commonwealth of Nations and Europe. The North American biscuit is typically a soft, leavened quick bread, and is covered in the article Biscuit
Biscuit
(bread). This article covers the other type of biscuit, which is typically hard, flat and unleavened.Contents1 Variations in meaning 2 Etymology 3 History3.1 Biscuits for travel 3.2 Confectionery biscuits4 Biscuits today4.1 Commonwealth of Nations and Europe 4.2 North America5 See also 6 Notes 7 References 8 External linksVariations in meaning[edit]In Commonwealth nations and Ireland, a biscuit is a small baked product that would be called either a "cookie" or a "cracker" in the United States
United States
and most of English-speaking Canada
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Romanesque Sculpture
Romanesque art
Romanesque art
is the art of Europe from approximately 1000 AD to the rise of the Gothic style in the 12th century, or later, depending on region. The preceding period is known as the Pre-Romanesque
Pre-Romanesque
period. The term was invented by 19th-century art historians, especially for Romanesque architecture, which retained many basic features of Roman architectural style – most notably round-headed arches, but also barrel vaults, apses, and acanthus-leaf decoration – but had also developed many very different characteristics. In Southern France, Spain
Spain
and Italy
Italy
there was an architectural continuity with the Late Antique, but the Romanesque style was the first style to spread across the whole of Catholic Europe, from Sicily to Scandinavia
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Historia Regum Britanniae
Historia regum Britanniae (The History of the Kings of Britain), originally called De gestis Britonum (On the Deeds of the Britons), is a pseudohistorical (fictitious) account of British history, written around 1136 by Geoffrey of Monmouth. It chronicles the lives of the kings of the Britons over the course of two thousand years, beginning with the Trojans founding the British nation and continuing until the Anglo-Saxons
Anglo-Saxons
assumed control of much of Britain around the 7th century. It is one of the central pieces of the Matter of Britain. Although credited uncritically well into the 16th century,[1] it is now considered to have no value as history. When events described, such as Julius Caesar's invasions of Britain, can be corroborated from contemporary histories, Geoffrey's account can be seen to be wildly inaccurate
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Déols
1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once. Déols
Déols
is a commune in the department of Indre
Indre
in the Centre-Val de Loire Region of central France. Déols
Déols
is an ancient town with a famous Benedictine
Benedictine
abbey, Abbaye Notre-Dame-du-Bourg-Dieu
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