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April
April
April
is the fourth month of the year in the Gregorian calendar, the fifth in the early Julian, the first of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the second of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. April
April
is commonly associated with the season of autumn in parts of the So
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Southern Hemisphere
Coordinates: 90°0′0″S 0°0′0″E / 90.00000°S 0.00000°E / -90.00000; 0.00000A photo of Earth
Earth
from Apollo 17
Apollo 17
(Blue Marble) originally had the south pole at the top; however, it was turned upside-down to fit the traditional perspectiveThe Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
highlighted in yellow ( Antarctica
Antarctica
not depicted)The Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
from above the South PoleThe Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
is the half sphere of Earth
Earth
which is south of the Equator
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Northern Hemisphere
Coordinates: 90°0′0″N 0°0′0″E / 90.00000°N 0.00000°E / 90.00000; 0.00000 Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
shaded blue. The hemispheres appear to be unequal in this image due to Antarctica
Antarctica
not being shown, but in reality are the same size. Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
from above the North
North
PoleThe Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
is the half of Earth
Earth
that is north of the Equator
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Latin
Latin
Latin
(Latin: lingua latīna, IPA: [ˈlɪŋɡʷa laˈtiːna]) is a classical language belonging to the Italic branch of the Indo-European languages. The Latin alphabet
Latin alphabet
is derived from the Etruscan and Greek alphabets, and ultimately from the Phoenician alphabet. Latin
Latin
was originally spoken in Latium, in the Italian Peninsula.[3] Through the power of the Roman Republic, it became the dominant language, initially in Italy and subsequently throughout the Roman Empire. Vulgar Latin
Vulgar Latin
developed into the Romance languages, such as Italian, Portuguese, Spanish, French, and Romanian. Latin, Greek and French have contributed many words to the English language
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APR (other)
APR or Apr may refer to: Organizations[edit]Agrarian Party of Russia, a left-wing political party in Russia Alabama Public Radio American Public Radio, now Public Radio International Andy Petree Racing, stock car auto racing team Appian Publications & Recordings Armée Patriotique Rwandaise FC, Rwandan association football club Asia-Pacific Scout Region (World Organization of the Scout Movement)Technology[edit]Acoustic paramagnetic resonance, a resonant absorption effect used in magnetic resonance spectroscopy Acute phase reaction, a reaction due to the presence of inflammatory allergens Advanced port replicator, a docking device Apache Portable Runtime, a library for the Apache web server ARP Poison Routing, spoofing of the address resolution protocol (ARP) Brügger & Thomet APR, the Advanced Precision Rifle, a Swiss sniper rifle The APR-1400 and APR+ advanced pressurized reactor, a series of South Korean pressurized water nuclear reactors Air-Purifying Re
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Spring (season)
Spring is one of the four conventional temperate seasons, following winter and preceding summer. There are various technical definitions of spring, but local usage of the term varies according to local climate, cultures and customs. When it is spring in the Northern Hemisphere, it is autumn in the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
and vice versa. At the spring, or vernal, equinox, days are approximately 12 hours long with day length increasing as the season progresses. Spring and "springtime" refer to the season, and also to ideas of rebirth, rejuvenation, renewal, resurrection and regrowth. Subtropical and tropical areas have climates better described in terms of other seasons, e.g. dry or wet, monsoonal or cyclonic
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Autumn
Autumn, also known as fall in American and Canadian English,[1] is one of the four temperate seasons. Autumn
Autumn
marks the transition from summer to winter, in September (Northern Hemisphere) or March (Southern Hemisphere), when the duration of daylight becomes noticeably shorter and the temperature cools down considerably
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Julian Calendar
The Julian calendar, proposed by Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
in 46 BC (708 AUC), was a reform of the Roman calendar.[1] It took effect on 1 January
January
45 BC (AUC 709), by edict. It was the predominant calendar in the Roman world, most of Europe, and in European settlements in the Americas and elsewhere, until it was refined and gradually replaced by the Gregorian calendar, promulgated in 1582 by Pope Gregory XIII. The Julian calendar
Julian calendar
gains against the mean tropical year at the rate of one day in 128 years. For the Gregorian calendar, the figure is one day in 3,030 years.[2] The difference in the average length of the year between Julian (365.25 days) and Gregorian (365.2425 days) is 0.002%. The Julian calendar
Julian calendar
has a regular year of 365 days divided into 12 months, as listed in the table below. A leap day is added to February every four years
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Gregorian Calendar
The Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
is internationally the most widely used civil calendar.[1][2][Note 1] It is named after Pope Gregory XIII, who introduced it in October
October
1582. It was a refinement to the Julian calendar[3] involving an approximately 0.002% correction in the length of the calendar year. The motivation for the reform was to stop the drift of the calendar with respect to the equinoxes and solstices—particularly the northern vernal equinox, which helps set the date for Easter. Transition to the Gregorian calendar
Gregorian calendar
would restore the holiday to the time of the year in which it was celebrated when introduced by the early Church. The reform was adopted initially by the Catholic countries of Europe
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2018
2018
2018
is the current year, and is a common year starting on Monday of the Gregorian calendar, the 2018th year of the Common Era
Common Era
(CE) and
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September
September
September
is the ninth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, the third of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the fourth of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. In the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
September
September
is the seasonal equivalent of March in the Southern Hemisphere. In the Northern hemisphere, the beginning of the meteorological autumn is on 1 September. In the Southern hemisphere, the beginning of the meteorological spring is on 1 September.[1]  September
September
marks the beginning of the ecclesiastical year in the Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
Church
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November
November
November
is the eleventh and penultimate month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars, the fourth and last of four months to have a length of 30 days, and the fifth and last of five months to have a length of less than 31 days. November
November
was the ninth month of the ancient Roman calendar. November
November
retained its name (from the Latin novem meaning "nine") when January
January
and February
February
were added to the Roman calendar. November
November
is a month of late spring in the Southern Hemisphere and late autumn in the Northern Hemisphere. Therefore, November
November
in the Southern Hemisphere
Southern Hemisphere
is the seasonal equivalent of May in the Northern Hemisphere
Northern Hemisphere
and vice versa
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December
December
December
is the twelfth and final month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and is the seventh and last of seven months to have a length of 31 days.December, from the Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry December
December
got its name from the Latin word decem (meaning ten) because it was originally the tenth month of the year in the Roman calendar, which began in March. The winter days following December
December
were not included as part of any month. Later, the months of January
January
and February
February
were created out of the monthless period and added to the beginning of the calendar, but December
December
retained its name.[1] In Ancient Rome, as one of the four Agonalia, this day in honor of Sol Indiges was held on December
December
11, as was Septimontium
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October
October
October
is the tenth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the sixth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. The eighth month in the old Roman calendar, October
October
retained its name (from the Latin ôctō meaning "eight") after January
January
and February were inserted into the calendar that had originally been created by the Romans. In Ancient Rome, one of three Mundus patet would take place on October
October
5, Meditrinalia October
October
11, Augustalia
Augustalia
on October
October
12, October Horse
October Horse
on October
October
15, and Armilustrium on October
October
19. These dates do not correspond to the modern Gregorian calendar
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August
August
August
is the eighth month of the year in the Julian and Gregorian calendars, and the fifth of seven months to have a length of 31 days.[1] It was originally named Sextilis
Sextilis
in Latin
Latin
because it was the sixth month in the original ten-month Roman calendar
Roman calendar
under Romulus in 753 BC, and March
March
was the first month of the year. About 700 BC, it became the eighth month when January
January
and February
February
were added to the year before March
March
by King Numa Pompilius, who also gave it 29 days. Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
added two days when he created the Julian calendar
Julian calendar
in 46 BC (708 AUC), giving it its modern length of 31 days. In 8 BC, it was renamed in honor of Augustus
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July
July
July
is the seventh month of the year (between June
June
and August) in the Julian and Gregorian Calendars and the fourth of seven months to have a length of 31 days. It was named by the Roman Senate in honour of Roman general Julius Cæsar, it being the month of his birth. Prior to that, it was called Quintilis, being the fifth month of the 10-month calendar. It is on average the warmest month in most of the Northern hemisphere, where it is the second month of summer, and the coldest month in much of the Southern hemisphere, where it is the second month of winter. The second half of the year commences in July
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