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Allosaurus
ALLOSAURUS (/ˌæləˈsɔːrəs/ ) is a genus of large theropod dinosaur that lived 155 to 150 million years ago during the late Jurassic
Jurassic
period ( Kimmeridgian to early Tithonian
Tithonian
). The name "Allosaurus" means "different lizard". It is derived from the Greek ἄλλος/allos ("different, other") and σαῦρος/sauros ("lizard / generic reptile"). The first fossil remains that could definitively be ascribed to this genus were described in 1877 by paleontologist Othniel Charles Marsh
Othniel Charles Marsh
. These remains became known as Antrodemus
Antrodemus
. As one of the first well-known theropod dinosaurs, it has long attracted attention outside of paleontological circles. Indeed, it has been a top feature in several films and documentaries about prehistoric life. Allosaurus
Allosaurus
was a large bipedal predator
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North America
NORTH AMERICA is a continent entirely within the Northern Hemisphere and almost all within the Western Hemisphere
Western Hemisphere
; it is also considered by some to be a northern subcontinent of the Americas
Americas
. It is bordered to the north by the Arctic Ocean
Arctic Ocean
, to the east by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
, to the west and south by the Pacific Ocean
Pacific Ocean
, and to the southeast by South America
South America
and the Caribbean Sea
Caribbean Sea
. North America
North America
covers an area of about 24,709,000 square kilometers (9,540,000 square miles), about 16.5% of the earth's land area and about 4.8% of its total surface
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Type Species
In zoological nomenclature , a TYPE SPECIES (species typica) is the species name with which the name of a genus or subgenus is considered to be permanently taxonomically associated, i.e., the species that contains the biological type specimen(s). A similar concept is used for suprageneric groups called a type genus . In botanical nomenclature , these terms have no formal standing under the code of nomenclature , but are sometimes borrowed from zoological nomenclature. In botany, the type of a genus name is a specimen (or, rarely, an illustration) which is also the type of a species name. The species name that has that type can also be referred to as the type of the genus name. Names of genus and family ranks, the various subdivisions of those ranks, and some higher-rank names based on genus names, have such types. In bacteriology , a type species is assigned for each genus
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Synonym (taxonomy)
In scientific nomenclature , a SYNONYM is a scientific name that applies to a taxon that (now) goes by a different scientific name, although the term is used somewhat differently in the zoological code of nomenclature. For example, Linnaeus was the first to give a scientific name (under the currently used system of scientific nomenclature) to the Norway spruce, which he called Pinus abies. This name is no longer in use: it is now a synonym of the current scientific name which is Picea abies
Picea abies
. Unlike synonyms in other contexts, in taxonomy a synonym is not interchangeable with the name of which it is a synonym. In taxonomy, synonyms are not equals, but have a different status. For any taxon with a particular circumscription , position, and rank, only one scientific name is considered to be the correct one at any given time (this correct name is to be determined by applying the relevant code of nomenclature )
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Food Chain
A FOOD CHAIN is a linear network of links in a food web starting from producer organisms (such as grass or trees which use radiation from the Sun
Sun
to make their food) and ending at apex predator species (like grizzly bears or killer whales ), detritivores (like earthworms or woodlice ), or decomposer species (such as fungi or bacteria ). A food chain also shows how the organisms are related with each other by the food they eat. Each level of a food chain represents a different trophic level . A food chain differs from a food web, because the complex network of different animals ' feeding relations are aggregated and the chain only follows a direct, linear pathway of one animal at a time . Natural interconnections between food chains make it a food web. A common metric used to quantify food web trophic structure is food chain length
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Biped
BIPEDALISM is a form of terrestrial locomotion where an organism moves by means of its two rear limbs or legs . An animal or machine that usually moves in a BIPEDAL manner is known as a BIPED /ˈbaɪpɛd/ , meaning "two feet" (from the Latin
Latin
bis for "double" and pes for "foot"). Types of bipedal movement include walking , running , or hopping . Few modern species are habitual bipeds whose normal method of locomotion is two-legged. Within mammals , habitual bipedalism has evolved multiple times, with the macropods , kangaroo rats and mice , springhare , hopping mice , pangolins and homininan apes, as well as various other extinct groups evolving the trait independently
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Predation
In an ecosystem, PREDATION is a biological interaction where a PREDATOR (an organism that is hunting) feeds on its PREY (the organism that is attacked). Predators may or may not kill their prey prior to feeding on it, but the act of predation often results in the death of the prey and the eventual absorption of the prey's tissue through digestion. It could also constitute a chase, stalking, or attack of prey. Thus predation is often, though not always, carnivory . Other categories of consumption are herbivory (eating parts of plants), fungivory (eating parts of fungi), and detritivory (the consumption of dead organic material). All of these are consumer-resource systems . It can often be difficult to separate various types of feeding behaviors . For example, some parasites prey on their host and then lay their eggs on it, for their offspring to feed on it while it continues to live, or on its decaying corpse after it has died
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Saurischia
SAURISCHIA (/sɔːˈrɪskiə/ saw-RIS-kee-ə , from the Greek sauros (σαυρος) meaning 'lizard' and ischion (ισχιον) meaning "hip joint") is one of the two basic divisions of dinosaurs (the other being Ornithischia ). In 1888, Harry Seeley classified dinosaurs into two orders , based on their hip structure, though today most paleontologists classify Saurischia
Saurischia
as an unranked clade rather than an order. DESCRIPTIONAll carnivorous dinosaurs (certain types of theropods ) are traditionally classified as saurischians, as are all of the birds and one of the two primary lineages of herbivorous dinosaurs, the sauropodomorphs . At the end of the Cretaceous
Cretaceous
Period , all saurischians except the birds became extinct in the course of the Cretaceous– Paleogene extinction event
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Documentary Film
A DOCUMENTARY FILM is a nonfictional motion picture intended to document some aspect of reality , primarily for the purposes of instruction, education, or maintaining a historical record . Such films were originally shot on film stock —the only medium available—but now include video and digital productions that can be either direct-to-video , made into a TV show, or released for screening in cinemas. "Documentary" has been described as a "filmmaking practice, a cinematic tradition, and mode of audience reception" that is continually evolving and is without clear boundaries
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Joseph Leidy
JOSEPH LEIDY (September 9, 1823 – April 30, 1891) was an American paleontologist . Leidy was professor of anatomy at the University of Pennsylvania
Pennsylvania
, and later was a professor of natural history at Swarthmore College
Swarthmore College
. His book Extinct Fauna of Dakota and Nebraska (1869) contained many species not previously described and many previously unknown on the North American continent. At the time, scientific investigation was largely the province of wealthy amateurs. CONTENTS * 1 Paleontology
Paleontology
* 2 Other scientific fields * 3 Family * 4 Forensic innovator * 5 Bibliography * 6 Citations * 7 References * 8 External links PALEONTOLOGYLeidy named the holotype specimen of Hadrosaurus foulkii, which was recovered from the marl pits of Haddonfield, New Jersey
Haddonfield, New Jersey

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Period (geology)
A GEOLOGIC PERIOD is one of several subdivisions of geologic time enabling cross-referencing of rocks and geologic events from place to place. These periods form elements of a hierarchy of divisions into which geologists have split the Earth\'s history . Eons and eras are larger subdivisions than periods while periods themselves may be divided into epochs and ages . The rocks formed during a period belong to a stratigraphic unit called a system . CONTENTS * 1 Structure * 2 Correlation issues * 3 See also * 4 References STRUCTUREThe twelve currently recognised periods of the present eon – the Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
– are defined by the International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS) by reference to the stratigraphy at particular locations around the world
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Film
FILM, also called a MOVIE, MOTION PICTURE, THEATRICAL FILM, or PHOTOPLAY, is a series of still images that when shown on a screen create an illusion of motion images (due to the phi phenomenon ). See glossary of motion picture terms . This optical illusion causes the audience to perceive continuous motion between separate objects viewed rapidly in succession. The process of filmmaking is both an art and an industry . A film is created by photographing actual scenes with a motion picture camera ; by photographing drawings or miniature models using traditional animation techniques; by means of CGI and computer animation ; or by a combination of some or all of these techniques and other visual effects . The word "CINEMA", short for cinematography , is often used to refer to the industry of films and filmmaking or to the art of filmmaking itself
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Genus
A GENUS (/ˈdʒiːnəs/ , pl. GENERA /ˈdʒɛnərə/ ) is a taxonomic rank used in the biological classification of living and fossil organisms in biology . In the hierarchy of biological classification, genus comes above species and below family . In binomial nomenclature , the genus name forms the first part of the binomial species name for each species within the genus. E.g. Felis catus
Felis catus
and Felis
Felis
silvestris are two species within the genus Felis
Felis
. Felis
Felis
is a genus within the family Felidae . The composition of a genus is determined by a taxonomist . The standards for genus classification are not strictly codified, so different authorities often produce different classifications for genera
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Portugal
PORTUGAL (Portuguese : ), officially the PORTUGUESE REPUBLIC (Portuguese: República Portuguesa ), is a sovereign state located mostly on the Iberian Peninsula in southwestern Europe
Europe
. It is the westernmost country of mainland Europe
Europe
, being bordered to the west and south by the Atlantic Ocean
Atlantic Ocean
and to the north and east by Spain
Spain
. Its territory also includes the Atlantic
Atlantic
archipelagos of the Azores and Madeira , both autonomous regions with their own regional governments . At 1.7 million km2, its Exclusive Economic Zone is the 3rd largest in the European Union
European Union
and the 11th largest in the world
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Tanzania
Coordinates : 6°18′25″S 34°51′14″E / 6.307°S 34.854°E / -6.307; 34.854 United Republic
Republic
of Tanzania Jamhuri Ya Muungano wa Tanzania
Tanzania
(Swahili ) Flag Coat of arms M
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Edward Drinker Cope
EDWARD DRINKER COPE (July 28, 1840 – April 12, 1897) was an American paleontologist and comparative anatomist , as well as a noted herpetologist and ichthyologist . He was a founder of the Neo-Lamarckism school of thought. Born to a wealthy Quaker family, Cope distinguished himself as a child prodigy interested in science; he published his first scientific paper at the age of 19. Though his father tried to raise Cope as a gentleman farmer, he eventually acquiesced to his son's scientific aspirations. Cope married his cousin and had one child; the family moved from Philadelphia
Philadelphia
to Haddonfield, New Jersey
Haddonfield, New Jersey
, although Cope would maintain a residence and museum in Philadelphia
Philadelphia
in his later years. Cope had little formal scientific training, and he eschewed a teaching position for field work
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