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Alawite
The Alawis, also rendered as Alawites
Alawites
(Arabic: علوية‎ Alawiyyah/Alawīyah), are a syncretic sect of the Twelver
Twelver
branch of Shia Islam, primarily centered in Syria. The eponymously named Alawites
Alawites
revere Ali
Ali
( Ali
Ali
ibn Abi Talib), considered the first Imam of the Twelver
Twelver
school. However, they are generally considered to be Ghulat
Ghulat
by most other sects of Shia Islam.[citation needed] The sect is believed to have been founded by Ibn Nusayr
Ibn Nusayr
during the 9th century, and fully established as a religion
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Mardaites
Catholicism portal Eastern Christianity portalv t eThe Mardaites
Mardaites
(Greek: Μαρδαΐται) or al-Jarajima (Syriac: ܡܪ̈ܕܝܐ‎; Arabic: الجراجمة‎ / ALA-LC: al-Jarājimah), inhabited the highland regions of the Nur Mountains. The Mardaites were early Christians following either Miaphysitism
Miaphysitism
or Monothelitism and bear a possible, but unconfirmed, relation to the Maronites.[1] Little is known about their ethnicity, it has been speculated that they might have been Persians or Armenians, yet other sources claim them to have been native to the Levant
Levant
or possibly even from the Arabian peninsula.[1] Their other Arabic
Arabic
name, al-Jarājimah, suggests that some were natives of the town Jurjum in Cilicia
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Arabic Language
Arabic
Arabic
(Arabic: العَرَبِيَّة‎) al-ʻarabiyyah [ʔalʕaraˈbijːah] ( listen) or (Arabic: عَرَبِيّ‎) ʻarabī [ˈʕarabiː] ( listen) or [ʕaraˈbij]) is a Central Semitic language that first emerged in Iron Age northwestern Arabia and is now the lingua franca of the Arab world.[4] It is named after the Arabs, a term initially used to describe peoples living from Mesopotamia
Mesopotamia
in the east to the Anti- Lebanon
Lebanon
mountains in the west, in northwestern Arabia, and in the Sinai peninsula. Arabic
Arabic
is classified as a macrolanguage comprising 30 modern varieties, including its standard form (Modern Standard Arabic) [5]. The modern written language (Modern Standard Arabic) is derived from Classical Arabic
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Baniyas
Baniyas
Baniyas
(Arabic: بانياس‎ Bāniyās) is a city in Tartous Governorate, northwestern Syria, located 55 km south of Latakia (ancient Laodicea) and 35 km north of Tartous
Tartous
(ancient Tortosa). It is famous for its citrus fruit orchards and its export of wood. North of the city is an oil refinery, one of the largest in Syria, and a power station. The oil refinery is connected with Iraq with Kirkuk–Baniyas pipeline
Kirkuk–Baniyas pipeline
(now defunct). On a nearby hill stands the Crusader castle
Crusader castle
of Margat
Margat
(Qalaat el-Marqab), a huge Knights Hospitaller
Knights Hospitaller
fortress built with black basalt stone.Contents1 History 2 Climate 3 Bishopric 4 ReferencesHistory[edit] In Phoenician and Hellenistic times, it was an important seaport
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Frank Hurley
James Francis "Frank" Hurley, OBE (15 October 1885 – 16 January 1962) was an Australian photographer and adventurer. He participated in a number of expeditions to Antarctica
Antarctica
and served as an official photographer with Australian forces during both world wars. His artistic style produced many memorable images
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Falconry
Falconry
Falconry
is the hunting of wild animals in its natural state and habitat by means of a trained bird of prey. There are two traditional terms used to describe a person involved in falconry: a falconer flies a falcon; an austringer (German origin) flies a hawk ( Accipiter
Accipiter
and some buteos and similar) or an eagle (Aquila or similar). In modern falconry, the red-tailed hawk ( Buteo
Buteo
jamaicensis), the Harris's hawk (Parabuteo unicinctus), and the peregrine falcon (Falco perigrinus) are some of the more commonly used birds of prey. The practice of hunting with a conditioned falconry bird is also called "hawking" or "gamehawking", although the words "hawking" and "hawker" have become used so much to refer to petty traveling traders, that the terms "falconer" and "falconry" now apply to most use of trained birds of prey to catch game
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Middle East
The Middle East[note 1] is a transcontinental region centered on Western Asia, Turkey
Turkey
(both Asian and European), and Egypt
Egypt
(which is mostly in North Africa). The corresponding adjective is Middle Eastern and the derived noun is Middle Easterner. The term has come into wider usage as a replacement of the term Near East
Near East
(as opposed to the Far East) beginning in the early 20th century. Arabs, Turks, Persians, Kurds, and Azeris (excluding Azerbaijan) constitute the largest ethnic groups in the region by population.[2] Minorities of the Middle East
Middle East
include Jews, Baloch, Greeks, Assyrians, and other Arameans, Berbers, Circassians
Circassians
(including Kabardians), Copts, Druze, Lurs, Mandaeans, Samaritans, Shabaks, Tats, and Zazas. In the Middle East, there is also a Romani community
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Hate Speech
Hate speech
Hate speech
is speech that attacks a person or group on the basis of attributes such as race, religion, ethnic origin, sexual orientation, disability, or gender.[1][2] The law of some countries describes hate speech as speech, gesture or conduct, writing, or display that incites violence or prejudicial action against a protected group or individual on the basis of their membership of the group, or because it disparages or intimidates a protected group, or individual on the basis of their membership of the group. The law may identify a protected group by certain characteristics.[3][4][5] In some countries, hate speech is not a legal term[6] and in some it is constitutionally protected.[7] In some countries, a victim of hate speech may seek redress under civil law, criminal law, or both. A website that contains hate speech may be called a hate site
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Arameans
The Arameans, or Aramaeans (Aramaic: ܐܪ̈ܡܝܐ‎, ʼaramáyé), were an ancient Northwest Semitic Aramaic-speaking tribal confederation who emerged from the region known as Aram (in present-day Syria) in the Late Bronze Age (11th to 8th centuries BC). They established a patchwork of independent Aramaic kingdoms in the Levant
Levant
and seized large tracts of Mesopotamia. Use of the Western Aramaic language
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Hittites
The Hittites
Hittites
(/ˈhɪtaɪts/) were an Ancient Anatolian people who established an empire centered on Hattusa
Hattusa
in north-central Anatolia around 1600 BC. This empire reached its height during the mid-14th century BC under Suppiluliuma I, when it encompassed an area that included most of Anatolia
Anatolia
as well as parts of the northern Levant
Levant
and Upper Mesopotamia. Between the 15th and 13th centuries BC the Hittite Empire
Empire
came into conflict with the Egyptian Empire, Middle Assyrian Empire
Empire
and the empire of the Mitanni
Mitanni
for control of the Near East. The Assyrians eventually emerged as the dominant power and annexed much of the Hittite empire, while the remainder was sacked by Phrygian newcomers to the region. After c
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Western World
The Western world, or simply the West (from Proto-Germanic
Proto-Germanic
root wes-; Ancient Greek: Ἓσπερος /ˈhɛspərʊs/, Hesperos,[1] "towards evening") refers to various nations depending on the context, most often including at least part of Europe. There are many accepted definitions, all closely interrelated.[2] The Western world
Western world
is also known as the Occident (from Latin
Latin
word occidens, "sunset, West"). The East and the Orient
Orient
are terms used as contraries. Ancient Greece[a][b] and ancient Rome[c] are generally considered to be the birthplaces of Western civilization, the former due to its impact on Western philosophy, democracy, science, art, and the ancient Roman culture, the latter due to its influence in governance, republicanism, law, architecture and warfare
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Hasan Al-Askari
Hasan ibn Ali
Hasan ibn Ali
ibn Muhammad
Muhammad
(c. 846 – 874) was the 11th Imam of Twelver
Twelver
Shia Islam, after his father Ali
Ali
al-Hadi. He was also called Abu Muhammad
Muhammad
and Ibn al-Ridha. Because Samarra, the city where he lived, was a garrison town, he is generally known as al-Askari (Askar is the word for military in Arabic). Al-Askari married Narjis
Narjis
Khatun and was kept under house arrest or in prison for most of his life, until, according to some Shia sources, he was poisoned at the age of 28 on the orders of the Abbasid
Abbasid
caliph Al-Mu'tamid
Al-Mu'tamid
and was buried in Samarra
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Eponym
An eponym is a person, place, or thing after whom or after which something is named, or believed to be named. The adjectives derived from eponym include eponymous and eponymic. For example, Elizabeth I of England is the eponym of the Elizabethan era, and "the eponymous founder of the Ford Motor Company" refers to Henry Ford
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Religious Syncretism
Religious syncretism
Religious syncretism
exhibits blending of two or more religious belief systems into a new system, or the incorporation into a religious tradition of beliefs from unrelated traditions. It is contrasted by the idea of multiple religious belonging and polytheism, respectively. This can occur for many reasons, and the latter scenario happens quite commonly in areas where multiple religious traditions exist in proximity and function actively in the culture, or when a culture is conquered, and the conquerors bring their religious beliefs with them, but do not succeed in entirely eradicating the old beliefs or, especially, practices. Religions may have syncretic elements to their beliefs or history, but adherents of so-labeled systems often frown on applying the label, especially adherents who belong to "revealed" religious systems, such as the Abrahamic religions, or any system that exhibits an exclusivist approach
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Turkish Language
Turkey
Turkey
(official), Northern Cyprus
Northern Cyprus
(official),
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World War II
Allied victoryCollapse of Nazi Germany Fall of Japanese and Italian Empires Dissolution of the League of Nations Creation of the United Nations Emergence of the United States
United States
and the Soviet Union
Soviet Union
as superpowers Beginning of the Cold War
Cold War
(more...)ParticipantsAllied Powers Axis PowersCommanders and leadersMain Allied leaders Joseph Stalin Franklin D
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