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Abrahamic Religions
The Abrahamic religions, also referred to collectively as Abrahamism, are a group of Semitic-originated religious communities of faith that claim descent from the practices of the ancient Israelites
Israelites
and the worship of the God
God
of Abraham. The term derives from a figure from the Bible
Bible
known as Abraham.[1] Abrahamic religion
Abrahamic religion
was able to spread globally through Christianity
Christianity
being adopted by the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
in the 4th century and Islam
Islam
by the Islamic Empire from the 7th century onward
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Islamic View Of Jesus' Death
The issue of the crucifixion, death and resurrection of Jesus
Jesus
(Isa) is rejected by most Muslims, but similar to Christians they believe that Jesus
Jesus
will return before the end of time.[1] Most Muslims believe Jesus
Jesus
was not crucified, but was raised bodily to heaven by God, a similar belief is found in the Gospel
Gospel
of Basilides,[2][3][4][5] the text of which is lost save for reports of it by other early scholars like Origen
Origen
(c. 185 – c. 254). Basilides, a theologian of Gnostic tendencies, taught in Alexandria in the second quarter of the second century. However, this view is disregarded by mainstream Christianity which only accepts the four gospels contained in the New Testament
New Testament
as genuine. Depending on the interpretation of the following verse, Muslim scholars have abstracted different opinions
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New Covenant
The New Covenant
New Covenant
(Hebrew ברית חדשה‬  berit hadashah (help·info); Greek διαθήκη καινή diatheke kaine) is a biblical interpretation originally derived from a phrase in the Book of Jeremiah, in the Hebrew Bible. It is often thought of as an eschatological (ultimate destiny of Humanity) Messianic Age
Messianic Age
or world to come and is related to the biblical concept of the Kingdom of God. Generally, Christians believe that the promised New Covenant
New Covenant
was instituted at the Last Supper
Last Supper
as part of the Eucharist,[1] which in the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
includes the New Commandment. Based on the Bible teaching that, "For where a testament is, there must also of necessity be the death of the testator
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Patriarchs (Bible)
The Patriarchs (Hebrew: אבות‎ Avot or Abot, singular Hebrew: אב‎ Ab or Aramaic: אבא Abba) of the Bible, when narrowly defined, are Abraham, his son Isaac, and Isaac's son Jacob, also named Israel, the ancestor of the Israelites. These three figures are referred to collectively as the patriarchs of Judaism, and the period in which they lived is known as the patriarchal age. They play significant roles in Hebrew scripture during and following their lifetimes. They are used as a significant marker by God in revelations[1] and promises,[2] and continue to play important roles in the Abrahamic faiths. More widely, the term Patriarchs can be used to refer to the twenty male ancestor-figures between Adam
Adam
and Abraham. The first ten of these are called the Antediluvian
Antediluvian
patriarchs, because they came before the Flood
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Isaac
According to the biblical Book of Genesis, Isaac
Isaac
(/ˈaɪzək/; Hebrew: יִצְחָק‬, Modern Yiṣḥáq, Tiberian Yiṣḥāq; Arabic: إسحٰق/إسحاق‎, Isḥāq) was the son of Abraham
Abraham
and Sarah
Sarah
and father of Jacob; his name means "he will laugh", reflecting when Sarah
Sarah
laughed in disbelief when told that she would have a child.[1] In the Bible, he is one of the three patriarchs of the Israelites, the only one whose name was not changed, and the only one who did not move out of Canaan.[1] According to the narrative, he died when he was 180 years old, the longest-lived of the three.[1] The biblical narrative of Isaac
Isaac
has influenced various religious traditions, including Judaism, Christianity and Islam
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Jacob
Jacob
Jacob
(/ˈdʒeɪkəb/; Hebrew: יַעֲקֹב‬, Modern  Ya‘aqōv (help·info), Tiberian Yā‘āqōḇ), later given the name Israel, is regarded as a Patriarch
Patriarch
of the Israelites. According to the Book of Genesis, Jacob
Jacob
was the third Hebrew progenitor with whom God
God
made a covenant. He is the son of Isaac
Isaac
and Rebecca, the grandson of Abraham, Sarah
Sarah
and Bethuel, the nephew of Ishmael, and the younger twin brother of Esau. Jacob
Jacob
had twelve sons and at least one daughter, by his two wives, Leah
Leah
and Rachel, and by their handmaidens Bilhah and Zilpah. Jacob's twelve sons, named in Genesis, were Reuben, Simeon, Levi, Judah, Dan, Naphtali, Gad, Asher, Issachar, Zebulun, Joseph, and Benjamin
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Sarah
Sarah
Sarah
or Sara (/ˈsɛərə/ SAIR-ə;[1] Hebrew: שָׂרָה‬, Modern Sara, Tiberian Śārā ISO 259-3 Śara; Latin: Sara; Arabic: سارا or سارة Sāra) was the half–sister and wife of Abraham[2] and the mother of Isaac
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7th Century CE
The 7th century is the period from 601 to 700 in accordance with the Julian calendar in the Common Era. The Muslim conquests began with the unification of Arabia by Muhammad starting in 622. After Muhammad's death in 632, Islam expanded beyond the Arabian Peninsula under the Rashidun Caliphate (632–661) and the Umayyad Caliphate (661–750). The Islamic conquest of Persia in the 7th century led to the downfall of the Sassanid Empire
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1st Century CE
The 1st century was the century that lasted from AD 1 to AD 100 according to the Julian calendar. It is often written as the 1st century AD[1] or 1st century CE to distinguish it from the 1st century BC (or BCE) which preceded it
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7th Century BCE
The 7th century BC began the first day of 700 BC and ended the last day of 601 BC. The Assyrian Empire continued to dominate the Near East during this century, exercising formidable power over neighbors like Babylon and Egypt. In the last two decades of the century, however, the empire began to unravel as numerous enemies made alliances and waged war from all sides. The Assyrians finally left the world stage permanently when their capital Nineveh was destroyed in 612 BC
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Gentiles
Gentile (from Latin gentilis, by the French gentil, feminine: gentille, meaning of or belonging to a clan or a tribe) is an ethnonym that commonly means non-Jew.[1] Other groups that claim Israelite heritage sometimes use the term to describe outsiders.[2] The term is used by English translators for the Hebrew גוי‬ (goy) and נכרי‬ (nokhri) in the Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
and the Greek word ἔθνη (éthnē) in the New Testament. The term "gentiles" is derived from Latin, used for contextual translation, and not an original Hebrew or Greek word from the Bible. The original words goy and ethnos refer to "peoples" or "nations" and are applied to both Israelites
Israelites
and non- Israelites
Israelites
in the Bible.[3] However, in most biblical uses, it denotes nations that are politically distinct from Israel
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Ishmaelites
According to the Book of Genesis, Ishmaelites (Arabic: Bani Isma'il, Hebrew: Bnai Yishma'el) are the descendants of Ishmael, the elder son of Abraham
Abraham
and the descendants of the twelve sons and princes of Ishmael. In the Quran; "God has gifted all of Ishmael, Elisha, Jonah
Jonah
and Lot a favour above the nations".[1] "With some of their forefathers and their offspring and their brethren; and We chose them and guided them unto a straight path".[2]Contents1 Traditional origins 2 Historical records of the Ishmaelites 3 Genealogical attempt to trace the ancestry of the Arabs 4 See also 5 References 6 External linksTraditional origins[edit] According to the Book of Genesis, Abraham's first wife was named Sarah and her Egyptian slave was named Hagar. However Sarah
Sarah
could not conceive
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Roman Empire
Mediolanum
Mediolanum
(286–402, Western) Augusta Treverorum Sirmium Ravenna
Ravenna
(402–476, Western) Nicomedia
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Báb
Khadíjih-Bagum (1842–1850) A sister of Mullá Rajab Ali[1][2]Children Ahmad (1843–1843)Parent(s) Sayyid
Sayyid
Muhammad
Muhammad
Ridá (father) Fátimih Bagum (mother)Part of a series onBábism


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Sayyid
Sayyid
Sayyid
(also spelt Syed, Saiyed, Seyd, Sayed, Sayyad, Sayyed, Saiyid, Seyed, Said and Seyyed) (pronounced [səj.jɪd], Arabic: سيد‎; meaning Mister) (plural Sadah Arabic: سادة‎, Sāda(h), also spelled Sadat) is an honorific title denoting people ( Sayyid
Sayyid
for males, Sayyida for females) accepted as descendants of the Islamic prophet
Islamic prophet
Muhammad
Muhammad
through his grandsons, Hasan ibn Ali
Hasan ibn Ali
and Husayn ibn Ali
Husayn ibn Ali
(combined Hasnain),[1]:31 sons of Muhammad's daughter Fatimah
Fatimah
and his son-in-law Ali
Ali
( Ali
Ali
ibn Abi Talib).[2]:149 Female sayyids are given the titles Sayyida, Alawiyah or Sharifa
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Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
(/bəˈhɑːʊˌlɑː/; Arabic: بهاء الله‎, "Glory of God"; 12 November 1817 – 29 May 1892 and Muharram 2, 1233 - Dhu'l Qa'dah 2, 1309), born Mírzá Ḥusayn-`Alí Núrí (Persian: میرزا حسین‌علی نوری‎), was the founder of the Bahá'í
Bahá'í
Faith. He claimed to be the prophetic fulfilment of Bábism, a 19th-century outgrowth of Shaykhism,[1] and, in a broader sense to be a Manifestation of God. He also claimed he was the fulfillment of the eschatological expectations of Islam, Christianity, and other major religions.[2] Bahá'u'lláh
Bahá'u'lláh
became a follower of the Báb
Báb
in Persia
Persia
in 1845
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