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Kent Group
The Kent Group are a grouping of six granite Granite () is a coarse-grained (phanerite, phaneritic) intrusive rock, intrusive igneous rock composed mostly of quartz, alkali feldspar, and plagioclase. It forms from magma with a high content of silica and alkali metal oxides that slowly cool ... island An island (or isle) is an isolated piece of habitat that is surrounded by a dramatically different habitat, such as water. Very small islands such as emergent land features on atoll An atoll (), sometimes known as a coral atoll, i ...s located in Bass Strait Bass Strait () is a sea strait A strait is a naturally formed, narrowing, typically navigable waterway that connects two larger bodies of water. The surface water generally flows at the same elevation on both sides and through the strait ..., north-west of the Furneaux Group The Furneaux Group is a group of approximately 100 island An island (or isle) is an isolated piece of h ...
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Bass Strait
Bass Strait () is a sea strait A strait is a naturally formed, narrowing, typically navigable waterway that connects two larger bodies of water. The surface water generally flows at the same elevation on both sides and through the strait in either direction. Most commonly i ... separating Tasmania Tasmania (), abbreviated as TAS, is an island An island (or isle) is an isolated piece of habitat that is surrounded by a dramatically different habitat, such as water. Very small islands such as emergent land features on atol ... from the Australia Australia, officially the Commonwealth of Australia, is a Sovereign state, sovereign country comprising the mainland of the Australia (continent), Australian continent, the island of Tasmania, and numerous List of islands of Australia, sma ...n mainland, specifically the state of Victoria Victoria most commonly refers to: * Victoria (Australia), a state of the Commonwealth of Australia * Victoria, Bri ...
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Erith Island (Tasmania)
Erith Island, the second largest island in the Kent Group, is a densely vegetated and unpopulated granite island with steep slopes, located in the Bass Strait, lying off the north-east coast of Tasmania, between the Furneaux Group and Wilsons Promontory in Victoria, Australia, Victoria, Australia. The island is contained within the Kent Group National Park, Tasmania's northernmost national park, which was gazetted in 2002. Erith was highly modified for cattle grazing and is mainly covered by exotic pasture. Grazing ended with the acquisition of the pastoral lease, lease in 1997 by the Bush Heritage Australia, Australian Bush Heritage Fund, which subsequently relinquished it to the Tasmanian Government for incorporation in the national park. Fauna Recorded breeding seabird and wader species include little penguin, short-tailed shearwater, Pacific gull, and sooty oystercatcher. Mammals on Erith are the southern brown bandicoot, long-nosed potoroo and common brushtail possum. ...
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John Palmer (1814 Schooner)
''John Palmer'' was a schooner of 37 tons (Builder's Old Measurement, bm) that J. & W. Jenkins constructed in Cockle Bay (Sydney), Cockle Bay, Sydney in 1814; she was owned by D. H. Smith of Sydney, and registered there. She was wrecked with loss of life on 23 November 1819 in the Kent Group in Bass Strait. In November 1819 ''John Palmer'', Captain Bastian, sailed from Launceston, Tasmania, Launceston to Bass Strait, Tasmania, on a sealing trip. On her way she arrived on 23 November at the site of the shipwrecked ''Daphne (brig), Daphne'' at East Island in the Kent Group. There ''John Palmer'' picked up three passengers from ''Daphne'', including Emma Hook, and a lascar seaman. For reasons unknown the ship also picked up a bag of coin containing 400 pounds from ''Daphne''. As ''John Palmer'' attempted to beat out of the bay she was driven onto the rocks and became a total wreck. Emma Hook drowned, but the remaining sailors and passengers made it to shore. There they awaited res ...
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Brig
A brig is a sailing vessel with two square-rigged Square rig is a generic type of Sail-plan, sail and rigging arrangement in which the primary driving sails are carried on horizontal spar (sailing), spars which are perpendicular, or wikt:square#Adjective, square, to the keel of the vessel and t ... masts. During the Age of Sail Age or AGE may refer to: Time and its effects * Age, the amount of time something has been alive Alive may refer to: *Life Life is a characteristic that distinguishes physical entities that have biological processes, such as signaling a ..., brigs were seen as fast and maneuverable and were used as both naval warship A warship or combatant ship is a that is built and primarily intended for . Usually they belong to the of a state. As well as being armed, warships are designed to withstand damage and are usually faster and more maneuverable than . Unlike a ...s and merchant vessels. They were especially popular in the 18th and early ...
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Daphne (brig)
''Daphne'' was a brig constructed in Java that arrived in Australia in 1814. She was wrecked without loss of life on 26 October 1819 in the Kent Group in Bass Strait. She was on a voyage from Port Jackson to Company Rule in India, India. On August 1819, ''Daphne'', Captain Howard, sailed from Hobart for Port Jackson with wheat and potatoes. ''Daphne'' departed Sydney bound for India on 10 October 1819 under the command of John Howard. As she passed through Bass Strait he stopped at several islands to purchase sealskins from sealers in the area. On 26 October a gale rose and Howard sheltered in the lee of East Island (Tasmania), East Island. Howard went ashore, probably to find sealers. On arriving on shore he noticed that ''Daphne'' was being driven towards the rocks. He returned on board but could do little to save the brig. He therefore ordered the passengers and crew to abandon ship. The passengers made it to shore safely but ''Daphne'' was totally destroyed. The longboa ...
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William Hovell
William Hilton Hovell (26 April 1786 – 9 November 1875) was an English explorer of Australia. With Hamilton Hume, he made an 1824 overland expedition from Sydney to Port Phillip (near the site of present-day Melbourne), and later explored the area around Western Port. Early life Hovell was born in Great Yarmouth, Yarmouth, Norfolk, England. His father was captain and part owner of a vessel trading to the Mediterranean, which, during a voyage in 1794, was captured by the French and taken into a port, where he became a prisoner of war for two years. William, when only 10 years of age, went to sea to earn his living. After going through the hard life of a foremast hand, at 20 years of age he was mate of ''Zenobia'' bound to Peru, and two years later he was a mercantile marine captain of the ''Juno'' bound to Rio Janeiro, and others. He decided to come to Australia, arriving at Sydney New South Wales by the ship ''Earl Spencer'', with his wife Esther ''née'' Arndell (daughter of t ...
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Schooner
A schooner () is a type of sailing vessel A sailing ship is a sea-going vessel that uses sails mounted on Mast (sailing), masts to harness the power of wind and propel the vessel. There is a variety of sail plans that propel sailing ships, employing Square rig, square-rigged or Fore-and ... defined by its rig: fore-and-aft rigged on all of two or more masts and, in the case of a two-masted schooner, the foremast generally being shorter than the mainmast. A common variant, the topsail schooner also has a square topsail on the foremast, to which may be added a topgallant. Differing definitions leave uncertain whether the addition of a fore course would make such a vessel a brigantine A brigantine is a two-masted sailing vessel with a fully square-rigged foremast and at least two sails on the main mast: a square topsail and a Gaff rig, gaff sail mainsail (behind the mast). The main mast is the second and taller of the two mast .... Many schooners are gaff-rigged Gaff rig i ...
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The Brothers (ship)
''The Brothers'' was a 40-ton schooner wrecked in Bass Strait, Tasmania in 1816. She was under the command of Captain William Hilton Hovell. On 25 June 1816 the ship was anchored near the Kent Group in Bass Strait in an easterly gale when the cables broke and she was driven ashore. The cargo of twenty tons of salt and 800 bushels of wheat were lost overboard. One seaman, Daniel Wheeler, was drowned. For ten weeks the survivors lived on wheat washed ashore and whatever else they could scavenge until they were rescued by the brig, ''Spring'' under the command of Captain Bunster. The survivors arrived in Sydney on 6 September 1816. References

1800s ships Shipwrecks of Bass Strait Sailing ships Individual sailing vessels Maritime incidents in 1816 {{ship-stub ...
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Roadstead
A roadstead (or ''roads'' – the earlier form) is a body of water sheltered from rip current A rip current, often simply called a rip (or misleadingly a '' rip tide''), is a specific kind of water current that can occur near beaches with breaking waves. A rip is a strong, localized, and narrow current of water which moves directly away ...s, spring tides, or ocean swell where ship A ship is a large watercraft Watercraft, also known as water vessels or waterborne vessels, are vehicles A vehicle (from la, vehiculum) is a machine A machine is any physical system with ordered structural and functional propertie ...s can lie reasonably safely at anchor An anchor is a device, normally made of metal, used to connect a Watercraft, vessel to the Seabed, bed of a body of water to prevent the craft from drifting due to Leeway, wind or Ocean current, current. The word derives from Latin ''ancora'' ... without dragging or snatching.United States Army technical m ...
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John Murray (Australian Explorer)
John Murray ( ) was a seaman and explorer of Australia. He was the first European to land in Port Phillip Port Phillip (Kulin languages, Kulin: ''Naarm Naarm''), or Port Phillip Bay, is a horsehead-shaped enclosed bay on the central coast of southern Victoria (Australia), Victoria, Australia. The bay opens into the Bass Strait via a short, narr ..., the bay on which the cities of Melbourne Melbourne ( ) is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals (or more formally ''majuscule'') and smaller ... and Geelong Geelong () ( Wathawurrung: ''Djilang''/''Djalang'') is a port city The Porticciolo del Cedas port in Trieste.html"_;"title="Barcola_near_Trieste">Barcola_near_Trieste,_a_small_local_port A_port_is_a_ Barcola_near_Trieste,_a_sm ... are situated. It is believed he was born in Edinburgh Edinburgh (; ...
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Seal Hunting
Seal hunting, or sealing, is the personal or commercial hunting of . Seal hunting is currently practiced in ten countries: United States (above the in Alaska), Canada, Namibia, Denmark (in self-governing Greenland only), Iceland, Norway, Russia, Finland and Sweden. Most of the world's seal hunting takes place in Canada and Greenland. (DFO) regulates the seal hunt in Canada. It sets quotas (total allowable catch – TAC), monitors the hunt, studies the seal population, works with the Canadian Sealers' Association to train sealers on new regulations, and promotes sealing through its website and spokespeople. The DFO set harvest quotas of over 90,000 seals in 2007; 275,000 in 2008; 280,000 in 2009; and 330,000 in 2010. The actual kills in recent years have been less than the quotas: 82,800 in 2007; 217,800 in 2008; 72,400 in 2009; and 67,000 in 2010. In 2007, Norway claimed that 29,000 harp seals were killed, Russia claimed that 5,479 seals were killed and Greenland claimed that 9 ...
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Judgement Rocks
The Judgement Rocks, part of the Kent Group, is a small unpopulated granite islet and some associated bare rocks, located in the Bass Strait, lying off the north-east coast of Tasmania, between the Furneaux Group and Wilsons Promontory in Victoria, Australia, Victoria, Australia. The islet and associated rocks are contained within the Kent Group National Park. The rock was named by Matthew Flinders "from its resemblance to an elevated seat"., entry for 8 February 1798. Joanna Murray-Smith's novel ''Judgement Rock'' is named for the rocks and set among the islands of the Kent Group. Fauna Recorded breeding seabird and wader species include fairy prion, Pacific gull, silver gull, and sooty oystercatcher. The island hosts Tasmania's largest breeding colony of Australian fur seals, which also attracts visits by killer whales. The only reptile present is the metallic skink.Brothers, Nigel; Pemberton, David; Pryor, Helen; & Halley, Vanessa. (2001). ''Tasmania’s Offshore Islands: ...
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