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Hylton Castle
Hylton Castle ( ) is a stone castle in the North Hylton area of City of Sunderland, Sunderland, Tyne and Wear, England. Originally built from wood by the Baron Hylton, Hilton (later Hylton) family shortly after the Norman conquest of England, Norman Conquest in 1066, it was later rebuilt in stone in the late 14th to early 15th century.Whittaker, p.83 The castle underwent major changes to its interior and exterior in the 18th century and it remained the principal seat of the Hylton family until the death of the last Baron in 1746.Fry, p.246 It was then Gothic architecture, Gothicised but neglected until 1812, when it was revitalised by a new owner. Standing empty again until the 1840s, it was briefly used as a school until it was purchased again in 1862. The site passed to a local coal company in the early 20th century and was taken over by the Sovereign state, state in 1950. One of the castle's main features is the range of heraldry, heraldic devices found mainly on the west ...
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Façade
A façade or facade () is generally the front part or exterior of a building. It is a Loanword, loan word from the French language, French (), which means 'frontage' or 'face'. In architecture, the façade of a building is often the most important aspect from a design standpoint, as it sets the tone for the rest of the building. From the engineering perspective of a building, the façade is also of great importance due to its impact on Efficient energy use, energy efficiency. For historical façades, many local zoning regulations or other laws greatly restrict or even forbid their alteration. Etymology The word is a loanword from the French , which in turn comes from the Italian language, Italian , from meaning 'face', ultimately from post-classical Latin . The earliest usage recorded by the ''Oxford English Dictionary'' is 1656. Façades added to earlier buildings It was quite common in the Georgian architecture, Georgian period for existing houses in English towns to be giv ...
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Raby Castle
Raby Castle () is a medieval castle located near Staindrop in County Durham, England, among of deer park. It was built by John Neville, 3rd Baron Neville de Raby, between approximately 1367 and 1390. Cecily Neville, the mother of the Kings Edward IV of England, Edward IV and Richard III of England, Richard III, was born here. After Charles Neville, 6th Earl of Westmorland, led the failed Rising of the North in favour of Mary, Queen of Scots in 1569 Raby Castle was taken into royal custody. Sir Henry Vane the Elder purchased Raby Castle in 1626 and neighbouring Barnard Castle (castle), Barnard Castle from the Crown, and the Earls of Darlington and Dukes of Cleveland added a Gothic-style entrance hall and octagonal drawing room. From 1833 to 1891 they were the Duke of Cleveland, Dukes of Cleveland and they retain the title of Baron Barnard, Lord Barnard. Extensive alterations were carried out in the 17th and 18th centuries. It is famed for both its size and its art ...
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Lumley Castle
Lumley Castle is a 14th-century quadrangular castle at Chester-le-Street in the Northern England, North of England, near the city of Durham, England, Durham and a property of the Earl of Scarbrough. It is a Grade I listed building. It is currently a hotel. History It is named after its original creator, Sir Ralph de Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley, Ralph Lumley, who converted his family manor house into a castle in 1389 after returning from wars in Scotland. However, after being implicated in a plot to overthrow Henry IV of England, Henry IV he was imprisoned and ultimately executed, forfeiting his lands to the Earl of Somerset. In 1421 the ownership of the castle reverted to Sir Ralph Lumley's grandson, Thomas. During the time of John Lumley, 1st Baron Lumley, he altered the windows of the castle to let more light in, installed a new fireplace in the great hall along with a lavabo of black and white marble, adorned by a pelican, which is the crest of the Lumley coat of the arms.''Pev ...
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Gatehouse
A gatehouse is a type of fortified gateway A fortified gateway is an element of a variety of fortified structures, such as a castle in East Sussex East Sussex is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Diction ..., an entry control point building, enclosing or accompanying a gateway for a town, religious house, castle A castle is a type of fortification, fortified structure built during the Middle Ages predominantly by the nobility or royalty and by Military order (monastic society), military orders. Scholars debate the scope of the word ''castle'', but u ..., manor house#REDIRECT Manor house A manor house was historically the main residence of the lord of the manor. The house formed the administrative centre of a manor in the European feudal system; within its great hall were held the lord's manorial court ..., or other fortification building of importance. Gatehouses are typic ...
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River Wear
The River Wear (, ) in North East England North East England is one of nine official regions of England at the First-level NUTS of the European Union, first level of NUTS statistical regions of the United Kingdom, NUTS for Eurostat, statistical purposes. The region includes the counti ... rises in the Pennines The Pennines (), also known as the Pennine Chain or Pennine Hills, are a more-or-less continuous range of hills and mountains running between three regions of Northern England Northern England, also known as the North of England or simply ... and flows eastwards, mostly through County Durham County Durham ( ) is a historic county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers (publishe ... to the North Sea The North Sea is a sea The sea, connected as the world ocean or simply the ocean ...
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London
London is the capital Capital most commonly refers to: * Capital letter Letter case (or just case) is the distinction between the letters that are in larger uppercase or capitals (or more formally ''majuscule'') and smaller lowercase (or more formally ''minusc ... and largest city The United Nations The United Nations (UN) is an intergovernmental organization that aims to maintain international peace and international security, security, develop friendly relations among nations, achieve international cooperation, ... of England England is a that is part of the . It shares land borders with to its west and to its north. The lies northwest of England and the to the southwest. England is separated from by the to the east and the to the south. The country cover ... and the United Kingdom The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, commonly known as the United Kingdom (UK) or Britain,Usage is mixed. The Guardian' and Tel ...
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Faversham
Faversham is a market town A market town is a European that obtained by custom or royal charter, in the , a market right, which allowed it to host a regular ; this distinguished it from a or . In Britain, small rural towns with a hinterland of villages are still com ... in Kent Kent is a county A county is a geographical region of a country used for administrative or other purposesChambers Dictionary The ''Chambers Dictionary'' (''TCD'') was first published by William Chambers (publisher), William and Robert ..., England, from London and from Canterbury Canterbury (, ) is a and , situated in the heart of the , a local government district of , England. It lies on the . The is the of the and the worldwide owing to the importance of , who served as the to the around the turn of the 7th ..., next to the Swale The Swale is a tidal channel of the Thames estuary The Thames Estuary is where the River Thames meets the waters of the North S ...
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Azure (heraldry)
In heraldry Heraldry () is a discipline relating to the design, display and study of armorial bearings (known as armory), as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology Vexillology () is the study of the history, symbolism and usage of flag A fla ..., azure ( ) is the tincture A tincture is typically an extract An extract is a substance made by extracting a part of a raw material A raw material, also known as a feedstock, unprocessed material, or primary commodity, is a basic material that is used to produce ... with the colour blue Blue is one of the three primary colours of pigments in painting and traditional colour theory In the visual arts The visual arts are art forms such as painting Painting is the practice of applying paint Paint is any pig ..., and belongs to the class of tinctures called "colours". In engraving Engraving is the practice of incising a design onto a hard, usually flat surface by cutting groov ...
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Argent
In heraldry Heraldry () is a discipline relating to the design, display and study of armorial bearings (known as armory), as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology Vexillology () is the study of the history, symbolism and usage of flag A fla ..., argent () is the tincture A tincture is typically an extract An extract is a substance made by extracting a part of a raw material A raw material, also known as a feedstock, unprocessed material, or primary commodity, is a basic material that is used to produce ... of silver Silver is a chemical element In chemistry, an element is a pure Chemical substance, substance consisting only of atoms that all have the same numbers of protons in their atomic nucleus, nuclei. Unlike chemical compounds, chemical ele ..., and belongs to the class of light tinctures called "metals". It is very frequently depicted as white White is the lightest color Color (American English Ameri ...
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Blazon
In heraldry Heraldry () is a discipline relating to the design, display and study of armorial bearings (known as armory), as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology, together with the study of ceremony, Imperial, royal and noble ranks, rank and geneal ... and heraldic vexillology Vexillology () is the study of the history, symbolism and usage of flag A flag is a piece of textile, fabric (most often rectangular or quadrilateral) with a distinctive design and colours. It is used as a symbol, a signalling device, or for ..., a blazon is a formal description of a coat of arms#REDIRECT coat of arms A coat of arms is a heraldry, heraldic communication design, visual design on an escutcheon (heraldry), escutcheon (i.e., shield), surcoat, or tabard. The coat of arms on an escutcheon forms the central element of the fu ..., flag A flag is a piece of fabric (most often rectangular or quadrilateral) with a distinctive design and colours. It is used as a symbol ...
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