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Ramsgate
Ramsgate is a seaside resort, seaside town in the district of Thanet District, Thanet in east Kent, England. It was one of the great English seaside towns of the 19th century. In 2001 it had a population of about 40,000. In 2011, according to the Census, there was a population of 40,408. Ramsgate's main attraction is its coastline, and its main industries are tourism and fishing. The town has one of the largest marinas on the English south coast, and the Port of Ramsgate provided cross-English channel, channel ferries for many years. History Ramsgate began as a fishing and farming hamlet. The Christian missionary Augustine of Canterbury, St Augustine, sent by Pope Gregory I, Pope Gregory the Great, landed near Ramsgate in 597AD. The town is home to the Pugin's Church and Shrine of St Augustine, Shrine of St Augustine. The earliest reference to the town is in the Kent Hundred Rolls of 1274–5, both as ''Remmesgate'' (in the local personal name of ‘Christina de Remmesgate ...
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Port Of Ramsgate
The Port of Ramsgate (also known as Port Ramsgate, Ramsgate Harbour, and Royal Harbour, Ramsgate) is a harbour situated in Ramsgate, south-east England, serving English Channel, cross-Channel freight traffic and smaller working and pleasure craft. It is owned and operated by Thanet District Council. History The construction of Ramsgate Harbour began in 1749 and was completed in about 1850. The two most influential architects of the harbour were father and son John Shaw Sr., John Shaw and John Shaw Jr, who designed the clockhouse, the obelisk, the lighthouse and the Jacob's Ladder steps. The harbour has the unique distinction of being the only harbour in the United Kingdom awarded the right to call itself a Royal Harbour. This was bestowed by George IV of the United Kingdom, King George IV after he was taken by the hospitality shown by the people of Ramsgate when he used the harbour to depart and return with the Royal Yacht Squadron in 1821. Because of its proximity to mainland ...
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Ramsgate Sands
''Ramsgate Sands'', also known as ''Life at the Seaside'', is an oil-on-canvas painting by William Powell Frith, made in 1852 to 1854, which depicts a beach scene in Ramsgate. The painting was Frith's first great commercial success: it was exhibited at the Royal Academy summer exhibition in 1854, and bought by Queen Victoria. Frith made a series of similar pictures, showing groups of people in contemporary scenes, including ''The Derby Day'' of 1858, and ''The Railway Station'' of 1862 and ''Private View at the Royal Academy of 1883. Background After the South Eastern Railway, UK, South Eastern Railway reached Ramsgate Town railway station in 1846, the town of Ramsgate rapidly became a popular destination for day trips from London. Frith was already a successful artist. He became a member of the Royal Academy in 1853, and the painting was based on studies made by Frith during a holiday in Ramsgate in September 1851, where he was inspired by the variety of everyday life. Duned ...
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The Granville Hotel, Ramsgate
The Granville Hotel, Ramsgate, Kent, on the southeast coast of England, was a former hotel designed by Edward Welby Pugin, son of Augustus Pugin. The Granville was a hotel between 1869 and 1946 before being sold by proprietors Spiers & Pond. The building is now Granville House, a private residence containing 48 self-contained flats that are managed by Cockett Henderson. Granville House was Grade II listed on 16 October 1973. In 2010 the lease holders of Granville House gained the Right To Manage and are now responsible for looking after the building themselves. On 18 December 2012, at a public auction, the freehold of Granville House was purchased by Mr Eliasz Englander for £156,000. The Granville Cinema opposite, is named after the building. History After the death of Augusta Emma d'Este (Lady Truro) on 21 May 1866, the remainder of the land from the Mount Albion Estate was sold off to developers. Business partners, Robert Sankey, John Barnet Hodgson and Edward Welby Pugin ...
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Pugin's Church And Shrine Of St Augustine
St Augustine's Church or the Shrine of St Augustine of Canterbury is a Roman Catholic Church (building), church in Ramsgate, Kent. It was the personal church of Augustus Pugin, the renowned nineteenth century architect, designer, and reformer. The church is an example of Pugin's design ideas, and forms a central part of Pugin's collection of buildings in Ramsgate. Having built his home (The Grange, Ramsgate, next door), Pugin began work on St Augustine's in 1846 and worked on it until his death in 1852. His sons completed many of the designs. This is the site where Pugin is buried, in a vault beneath the chantry chapel he designed, alongside several members of his family. History St Augustine brought Christianity to the English for the first time in AD 597, landing very close to the site of St Augustine's. After his death (c.604), his tomb soon became a shrine. This shrine, which was enlarged and moved over the centuries, was destroyed under the orders of King Henry VIII and ...
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St Augustine's Abbey Ramsgate
St Augustine's Abbey or Ramsgate Abbey is a former Benedictine abbey in Ramsgate. It was built in 1860 by Augustus Pugin and is a Grade II listed building. It was the first Benedictine monastery to be built in England since the Reformation. In 2010, the monks moved to St Augustine's Abbey, Chilworth, St Augustine's Abbey in Chilworth, Surrey. The site is now owned by the Vincentian Family, Vincentian Congregation from Kerala, Kerala, India. Pugin's Church and Shrine of St Augustine, The church of St Augustine, across the road from the abbey site, belongs to the Archdiocese of Southwark and is a shrine of St Augustine of Canterbury. History Augustus Pugin had built his home, The Grange, Ramsgate, The Grange, in Ramsgate, and Pugin's Church and Shrine of St Augustine, St Augustine's Church next door. He donated the church to the Catholic Diocese of Southwark before his death in 1852, and The Grange remained in private hands. In 1856, the Bishop of Southwark (Roman Catholic), Bish ...
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Augustine Of Canterbury
Augustine of Canterbury (early 6th century – probably 26 May 604) was a monk A monk (, from el, μοναχός, ''monachos'', "single, solitary" via Latin Latin (, or , ) is a classical language A classical language is a language A language is a structured system of communication Communication (f ... who became the first Archbishop of Canterbury The Archbishop of Canterbury is the senior bishop A bishop is an ordained, consecrated, or appointed member of the Clergy#Christianity, Christian clergy who is generally entrusted with a position of authority and oversight. Within the Cat ... in the year 597. He is considered the "Apostle to the English" and a founder of the English Church.Delaney ''Dictionary of Saints'' pp. 67–68 Augustine was the prior Prior (or prioress) is an ecclesiastical {{Short pages monitorSclavinia,_Germania,_Sclavinia,_Germania,_Gallia">Germania.ht ... in 410, the inhabitants were left to defend them ...
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Vincent Van Gogh
Vincent Willem van Gogh (; 30 March 185329 July 1890) was a Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who posthumously became one of the most famous and influential figures in Western art ''; by Johannes Vermeer Johannes Vermeer ( , , #Pronunciation of name, see below; October 1632 – December 1675) was a Dutch Baroque Period Painting, painter who specialized in domestic interior scenes of middle class life. During his lifetime, ... history. In a decade, he created about 2,100 artworks, including around 860 oil painting Oil painting is the process of painting Painting is the practice of applying paint Paint is any pigmented liquid, liquefiable, or solid mastic composition that, after application to a substrate in a thin layer, converts to a s ...s, most of which date from the last two years of his life. They include landscapes A landscape is the visible features of an area of land Land is the solid surface of the Earth that is not permanently ...
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Interurban
The Interurban (or radial railway in Europe and Canada) is a type of electric railway (the "Skokie Swift"), shown shortly before the conversion to third rail operation in September 2004. A railway electrification system supplies electric power to Rail transport, railway trains and trams without an on-board Prime mover (locomotive ..., with streetcar A tram (also known as a streetcar or trolley in North America) is a train that runs on tramway track on public urban streets; some include segments of segregated Right-of-way (transportation), right-of-way. The lines or networks operated b ...-like electric self-propelled rail cars which run within and between cities or towns. They were very prevalent in North America between 1900 and 1925 and were used primarily for passenger travel between cities and their surrounding suburban and rural communities. The concept spread to countries such as Japan, the Netherlands, Switzerland, Belgium and Poland. Interurban as a term e ...
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Isle Of Thanet
The Isle of Thanet () is a peninsula at the most easterly point of Kent, England. While in the past it was separated from the mainland by the Wantsum Channel, it is no longer an island. Archaeological remains testify to its settlement in ancient times. Today, it is a tourist destination, and has an active agricultural base. Etymology The island of Thanet is mentioned as ''Tonetic'' (c. AD 150; the TON- of this form was misread as TOΛI-, hence it appears as ''Toliatis'' in the surviving manuscripts of Ptolemy); ''Tanat's'' (3rd C AD, Solinus); ''Tanatos'' (AD 731); ''Tenid'' in 679BEAUREPAIRE and ''Tenet'' (e.g. charters of AD 679, 689 and thereafter); and the Old Welsh forms ''Tanet'' and ''Danet'', found in the ''Historia Brittonum'' (c. AD 829/30) and Armes Prydein (c. AD 930). Standard reference works for English place-names (such as Eilert Ekwall's ''Concise Oxford Dictionary of English Place-Names'') state the name ''Tanet'' is known to be Common Brittonic, Brythonic in ...
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Town
A town is a human settlement. Towns are generally larger than villages and smaller than city, cities, though the criteria to distinguish between them vary considerably in different parts of the world. Origin and use The word "town" shares an origin with the German language, German word , the Dutch language, Dutch word , and the Old Norse . The original Proto-Germanic language, Proto-Germanic word, *''tūnan'', is thought to be an early borrowing from Proto-Celtic language, Proto-Celtic *''dūnom'' (cf. Old Irish , Welsh language, Welsh ). The original sense of the word in both Germanic and Celtic was that of a fortress or an enclosure. Cognates of "town" in many modern Germanic languages designate a fence or a hedge. In English and Dutch, the meaning of the word took on the sense of the space which these fences enclosed, and through which a track must run. In England, a town was a small community that could not afford or was not allowed to build walls or other larger fortifi ...
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Margate
Margate is a seaside town A seaside resort is a resort town ski resort, Slovakia Image:Nusa dua beach.jpg, Nusa Dua in Bali, Indonesia A resort town, often called a resort city or resort destination, is an urban area where tourism or vacationing is the primary compone ... in Thanet, Kent, England, northeast of Canterbury Canterbury (, ) is a and , situated in the heart of the , a local government district of , England. It lies on the . The is the of the and the worldwide owing to the importance of , who served as the to the around the turn of the 7th ..., which includes Cliftonville Cliftonville is a coastal area of the town of Margate Margate is a seaside resort, seaside town in Thanet District, Thanet, Kent, England, northeast of Canterbury, which includes Cliftonville, Garlinge, Palm Bay, UK, Palm Bay and Westbro ..., Garlinge, Palm Bay and Westbrook. The town has been a significant maritime port since the Middle Ages, and was associat ...
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