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Point Cloud
Point or points may refer to: Places * Point, Lewis, a peninsula in the Outer Hebrides, Scotland * Point, Texas, a city in Rains County, Texas, United States * Point, the NE tip and a ferry terminal of Lismore, Inner Hebrides, Scotland * Points, West Virginia, an unincorporated community in the United States Business and finance *Point (loyalty program), a type of virtual currency in common use among mercantile loyalty programs, globally * Point (mortgage), a percentage sometimes referred to as a form of pre-paid interest used to reduce interest rates in a mortgage loan * Basis point, 1/100 of one percent, denoted ''bp'', ''bps'', and ''‱'' * Percentage points, used to measure a change in percentage absolutely * Pivot point (technical analysis), a price level of significance in analysis of a financial market that is used as a predictive indicator of market movement * "Points", the term for profit sharing in the American film industry, where creatives involved in making the ...
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Point, Lewis
Point ( gd, An Rubha), also known as the Eye Peninsula, is a peninsula some 11 km long in the Outer Hebrides (or Western Isles), Scotland. The majority of Point is connected to the rest of the Isle of Lewis by a narrow isthmus, one mile in length and at one point barely 100 metres wide. The peninsula is just 6 km east of the regional capital of Stornoway, however the district of Point actually starts at the Parkend estate on Stornoway's outskirts. Point is home to around 2,600 people and is one of the few districts of the Western Isles where the population is increasing. There are about 17 villages and hamlets in Point: (listed west to east) Melbost (Mealabost) (Including Stornoway Airport), Branahuie (Bràigh na h-Aoidhe), Aignish (Aiginis), Knock (An Cnoc), Swordale (Suardail), Garrabost, Lower Bayble (Pabail Iarach), Eagleton (Baile na h-Iolaire), Upper Bayble (Pabail Uarach), Shulishader (Sulaisiader, usually referred to as Shader), Sheshader (Seisiader), Fl ...
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Point-free Geometry
In mathematics, point-free geometry is a geometry whose primitive ontological notion is ''region'' rather than point. Two axiomatic systems are set out below, one grounded in mereology, the other in mereotopology and known as ''connection theory''. Point-free geometry was first formulated in Whitehead (1919, 1920), not as a theory of geometry or of spacetime, but of "events" and of an "extension relation" between events. Whitehead's purposes were as much philosophical as scientific and mathematical. Formalizations Whitehead did not set out his theories in a manner that would satisfy present-day canons of formality. The two formal first-order theories described in this entry were devised by others in order to clarify and refine Whitehead's theories. The domain of discourse for both theories consists of "regions." All unquantified variables in this entry should be taken as tacitly universally quantified; hence all axioms should be taken as universal closures. No axiom r ...
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Point (pickleball)
This glossary provides definitions and context for terminology related to, and jargon specific to, the sport of pickleball. Words or phrases in italics can be found on the list in their respective alphabetic sections. 0–9 ;0–0:See '' Zero–Zero'' ;0–0–2 or 0–0–start: See '' Zero–Zero–Two''. A ;Ace:Any ''serve'' that is not returned by the ''receiver'', or, more specifically, a serve that the receiver's paddle never touches. The term, originally used in Tennis, has been attributed to American sportswriter Allison Danzig. ;Andiamo!:Meaning "Let's go!" in Italian, it can be heard after a player wins a particularly critical ''point''. The term was popularized in pickleball by professional player Julian Arnold. ;APP:See ''Association of Pickleball Professionals'' ;Approach shot:A shot executed while moving from the ''backcourt'' towards the ''non-volley line''. ;Around-the-post (ATP):A legal shot that travels outside the net posts, allowing its trajectory to stay ...
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Point (ice Hockey)
In ice hockey, point has three contemporary meanings. Personal stat A point is awarded to a player for each goal scored or assist earned. The total number of goals plus assists equals total points. The Art Ross Trophy is awarded to the National Hockey League (NHL) player who leads the league in scoring points at the end of the regular season. Team stat Points are also awarded to assess standings (or rankings). Historically, teams were awarded two points for each win, one point for each tie and no points for a loss. Such a ranking system, implemented primarily to ensure a tie counted as a "half-win" for each team in the standings, is generally regarded as British and/or European in origin and as such adopted by the National Hockey League which was founded in Canada where leagues generally used ranking systems of British origin. Awarding points in the standings contrasts with traditional American ranking systems favored in sports originating within the United States where today th ...
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Point (basketball)
Points in basketball are used to keep track of the score in a game. Points can be accumulated by making field goals (two or three points) or free throws (one point). If a player makes a field goal from within the three-point line, the player scores two points. If the player makes a field goal from beyond the three-point line, the player scores three points. The team that has recorded the most points at the end of a game is declared that game's winner. NBA Regular season * Most career points: Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (38,387 pts) * Highest career scoring average: Michael Jordan (30.12 ppg) * Most points scored in a season: 4,029 by Wilt Chamberlain (1961–62) * Highest seasonal scoring average: 50.4 by Wilt Chamberlain (1961–62) * Most points in one game: 100 by Wilt Chamberlain (3/2/1962 vs. New York Knicks) * Most points in one half, regular season: 59 by Wilt Chamberlain * Most points in one quarter, regular season: 37 by Klay Thompson * Most points in one overtime ...
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Point (American Football)
Gameplay in American football consists of a series of '' downs'', individual plays of short duration, outside of which the ball is ''dead'' or not in play. These can be plays from scrimmage – passes, runs, punts, or field goal attempts (from either a place kick or a drop kick) – or free kicks such as kickoffs and fair catch kicks. Substitutions can be made between downs, which allows for a great deal of specialization as coaches choose the players best suited for each particular situation. During a play, each team should have no more than 11 players on the field, and each of them has specific tasks assigned for that specific play. Objective of the game The objective of this game is to score more points than the other team during the allotted time. The team with the ball (the ''offense'') has 4 plays (''downs'') to advance at least 10 yards, and can score points once they reach the opposite end of the field, which is home to a scoring zone called the ''end zone'', as well ...
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Points Of The Compass
The points of the compass are a set of horizontal, radially arrayed compass directions (or azimuths) used in navigation and cartography. A compass rose is primarily composed of four cardinal directions—north, east, south, and west—each separated by 90 degrees, and secondarily divided by four ordinal (intercardinal) directions—northeast, southeast, southwest, and northwest—each located halfway between two cardinal directions. Some disciplines such as meteorology and navigation further divide the compass with additional azimuths. Within European tradition, a fully defined compass has 32 'points' (and any finer subdivisions are described in fractions of points). Compass points are valuable in that they allow a user to refer to a specific azimuth in a colloquial fashion, without having to compute or remember degrees. Designations The names of the compass point directions follow these rules: 8-wind compass rose * The four cardinal directions are north (N), east (E), ...
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Paris Point
The Paris point is a unit of length defined as . It is commonly used for shoe sizes in Continental Europe. The unit was invented by French shoemakers in the early 1800s. Its origin probably lies in centimetre being very close to inch; a French inch is around 27 mm, a quarter of that is 6.7 mm, close to 6. mm defined for the Paris point. See also * Point (other) * Barleycorn (unit), used in the English shoe sizing system. References Units of length {{measurement-stub ...
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Inch
Measuring tape with inches The inch (symbol: in or ″) is a unit of length in the British imperial and the United States customary systems of measurement. It is equal to yard or of a foot. Derived from the Roman uncia ("twelfth"), the word ''inch'' is also sometimes used to translate similar units in other measurement systems, usually understood as deriving from the width of the human thumb. Standards for the exact length of an inch have varied in the past, but since the adoption of the international yard during the 1950s and 1960s the inch has been based on the metric system and defined as exactly 25.4 mm. Name The English word "inch" ( ang, ynce) was an early borrowing from Latin ' ("one-twelfth; Roman inch; Roman ounce"). The vowel change from Latin to Old English (which became Modern English ) is known as umlaut. The consonant change from the Latin (spelled ''c'') to English is palatalisation. Both were features of Old English phonology; see and ...
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Thou (length)
A thousandth of an inch is a derived unit of length in a system of units using inches. Equal to of an inch, a thousandth is commonly called a thou (used for both singular and plural) or particularly in North America a mil (plural mils). The words are shortened forms of the English and Latin words for "thousand" ( in Latin). In international engineering contexts, confusion can arise because ''mil'' is a formal unit name in North America but ''mil'' or ''mill'' is also a common colloquial clipped form of millimetre. The units are considerably different: a millimetre is approximately 39 mils. Contexts of use The thou, or mil, is most commonly used in engineering and manufacturing in non-metric countries. For example, in specifying: * The thickness of items such as paper, film, foil, wires, paint coatings, latex gloves, plastic sheeting, and fibers ** For example, most plastic ID cards are about in thickness. ** Card stock thickness in the United States, where mils are also c ...
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Card Stock
Card stock, also called cover stock and pasteboard, is paper that is thicker and more durable than normal writing and printing paper, but thinner and more flexible than other forms of paperboard. Card stock is often used for business cards, postcards, playing cards, catalogue covers, scrapbooking, and other applications requiring more durability than regular paper gives. The surface usually is smooth; it may be textured, metallic, or glossy. When card stock is labeled cover stock, it often has a glossy coating on one or both sides (''C1S'' or ''C2S'', for "coated: one side" or "coated: two sides"); this is used especially in business cards and book covers. Measurements Most nations describe paper in terms of grammage—the weight in grams of one sheet of the paper measuring one square meter. Other people, especially in the United States, describe paper in terms of pound weight—the weight in pounds per ream (500 sheets) of the paper with a given area (based on histori ...
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Antler
Antlers are extensions of an animal's skull found in members of the Cervidae (deer) family. Antlers are a single structure composed of bone, cartilage, fibrous tissue, skin, nerves, and blood vessels. They are generally found only on males, with the exception of reindeer/caribou. Antlers are shed and regrown each year and function primarily as objects of sexual attraction and as weapons. In contrast to antlers, horns—found on pronghorns and bovids, such as sheep, goats, bison and cattle—are two-part structures that usually do not shed. A horn's interior of bone is covered by an exterior sheath made of keratin (the same material as human fingernails and toenails). Etymology Antler comes from the Old French ''antoillier '' (see present French : "Andouiller", from'' ant-, ''meaning before,'' oeil, ''meaning eye and'' -ier'', a suffix indicating an action or state of being) possibly from some form of an unattested Latin word ''*anteocularis'', "before the eye" ...
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