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The Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
is a college football stadium in the northeast United States, located in New Haven, Connecticut, on the border of West Haven, about 1½ miles (2½ km) west of the main campus of Yale University. The home of the Yale Bulldogs
Yale Bulldogs
of the Ivy League, it opened 104 years ago in 1914 with 70,896 seats; renovations have reduced its current capacity to 61,446. The Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
inspired the design and naming of the Rose Bowl, from which is derived the name of college football's post-season games ("bowl games") and the NFL's "Super Bowl". In 1973 and 1974, the stadium hosted the New York Giants
New York Giants
of the National Football League
National Football League
while Yankee Stadium
Stadium
was being renovated. They won just one of the dozen home games they played in New Haven in those two seasons. The Giants shared Shea Stadium
Stadium
in Queens
Queens
in 1975 with the New York Jets (and baseball Mets); Giants Stadium
Stadium
opened in 1976.

Contents

1 Construction 2 History 3 Gallery 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

Construction[edit] Ground was broken on the stadium in August 1913. Fill excavated from the field area was used to build up a berm around the perimeter to create an elliptical bowl. The façade was designed to partially echo the campus's Neo-Gothic
Neo-Gothic
design, and, as with some central campus buildings, acid was applied to imitate the effects of aging. It was the first bowl-shaped stadium in the country, and inspired the design of such stadiums as the Rose Bowl, the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum, and Michigan Stadium. It was declared a National Historic Landmark in 1987 for its role in football history.[3][4] The Yale Bowl's designer, Charles A. Ferry, for unknown reasons chose not to include locker rooms (or restrooms).[5] Players must dress in the Smilow Field Center and walk 200 yards (185 m) to the field. When the NFL's Giants played at the stadium (1973, 1974), the pro players disliked the arrangement, but Yale players reportedly enjoy the walk. Fans cheer for the team as it marches to the stadium while the Yale Band
Yale Band
plays.[6] By the 21st century, many of the outside retaining walls and portal entries were deteriorating. In the spring and summer of 2006, the bowl received a partial renovation, completed just in time for the first home game of the Yale football team's season on September 16. A previous scoreboard (notable for the time clock being arranged vertically instead of horizontally) was added in 1958 and replaced during the 2006 renovations. History[edit] Its inaugural game in 1914 was a 30–6 loss to rival Harvard on November 21,[5][7] with over 68,000 in attendance.[8] During the 1970s, the "Bowl" hosted several concerts. The Grateful Dead played a notable show in 1971 on July 31, which was released as Road Trips Volume 1 Number 3. A 1980 concert featuring the Eagles, Heart, and The Little River Band
The Little River Band
on June 14 proved to be the finale for the venue, as opposition from neighbors became increasingly vehement. A picture from this final show can be seen in packaging of the vinyl edition of the Eagles double live album, issued later that year, though no recordings from the event are included on the discs. A planned Paul McCartney
Paul McCartney
concert was scheduled for June 1990, but because of neighborhood opposition, the New Haven show was cancelled and the date was rescheduled for Chicago. The stadium has hosted many soccer matches over the years and served as home field for the Connecticut Bicentennials
Connecticut Bicentennials
of the North American Soccer League during the 1976 and 1977 seasons. Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
was a candidate as a possible playing site when the United States
United States
hosted the World Cup in 1994. However, two other venues in the region were chosen instead: Foxboro Stadium
Stadium
in Massachusetts
Massachusetts
and Giants Stadium
Stadium
in New Jersey.[9] On Friday, October 5, 2001, the closing ceremony of the Yale Tercentennial was held at the Yale Bowl. Guests included Tom Wolfe '57, William F. Buckley
William F. Buckley
'50, Sesame Street's Big Bird, Paul Simon
Paul Simon
'96 Hon, and Garry Trudeau
Garry Trudeau
'70. The Cullman-Heyman Tennis Center, home to the annual ATP/WTA event (the Pilot Pen tournament), is located across Yale Avenue from the stadium. Gallery[edit]

Yale Field - shown here during the 1910 Harvard-Yale game - was the Bulldogs' home until the construction of the Bowl in 1914.

A model of the Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
sold as a souvenir in 1914

Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
during the 1915 Yale-Princeton game.

The Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
from the north-west end 2005

See also[edit]

List of NCAA
NCAA
Division I FCS football stadiums List of National Historic Landmarks in Connecticut National Register of Historic Places
National Register of Historic Places
listings in New Haven, Connecticut

References[edit]

^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2018.  ^ National Park Service
National Park Service
(2007-01-23). "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service.  ^ a b "Yale Bowl". National Historic Landmark
National Historic Landmark
summary listing. National Park Service. Retrieved 2007-10-03.  ^ James H. Charleton (December 1985). "National Register of Historic Places Inventory-Nomination: Yale Bowl" (PDF). National Park Service.  and Accompanying aerial photo, from 1985 ^ a b Amore, Dom (November 13, 2014). " Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
starts big, and 100 years later, it remains special". Hartford Courant. (Connecticut). Retrieved December 1, 2017.  ^ Schonbrun, Zach (2014-11-02). "At Yale Bowl, 100 Years of Tradition, Pride and No Locker Rooms". The New York Times. Retrieved 11 September 2015.  ^ "Yale victim of bad breaks or score might have been closer". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington). November 22, 1914. p. 1, part 3.  ^ "Greatest football crowd ever, sees big match". The Day. (New London, Connecticut). November 21, 1914. p. 13.  ^ Hartford Courant: Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
Loses World Cup Bid

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Yale Bowl.

The Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
(from YaleBulldogs.com)

Preceded by Yankee Stadium Home of the New York Giants 1973–1974 Succeeded by Shea Stadium

v t e

Yale Bulldogs
Yale Bulldogs
football

Venues

Hamilton Park (1872–1883) Yale Field (1884–1913) Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
(1914–present)

Bowls & rivalries

Bowl games Brown Dartmouth Harvard (list) Penn Princeton

Culture & lore

1968 Harvard game (Harvard Beats Yale 29-29) 2004 Harvard–Yale prank Handsome Dan "Boola Boola" "Down the Field"

People

Head coaches NFL draftees

Seasons

1872 1873 1874 1875 1876 1877 1878 1879 1880 1881 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889 1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

National championship seasons in bold

v t e

New York Giants

Founded in 1925 Based and headquartered in East Rutherford, New Jersey

Franchise

Franchise Seasons Coaches Players First-round draft picks Quarterbacks

History

1925–78 1979–93 1994–present Financial history

Stadiums

Polo Grounds Yankee Stadium Yale Bowl Shea Stadium Giants Stadium MetLife Stadium

Culture

Cleveland Bulldogs The Duke Crunch Bunch Gatorade shower Big Blue Wrecking Crew I'm going to Disney World! Little Giants "New York Groove" "We Fly High" "The Masseuse" (Seinfeld episode) Big Fan Bob Sheppard Jim Hall Yankee Stadium
Stadium
Legacy License Plate Guy

Lore

Sneakers Game The Greatest Game Ever Played The Fumble Wide Right 2007 game vs. New England Patriots Helmet Catch The Comeback

Rivalries

Dallas Cowboys Philadelphia Eagles Washington Redskins San Francisco 49ers New York Jets

Key personnel

Owners: John Mara, Steve Tisch General Manager: Dave Gettleman Head Coach: Pat Shurmur

Division championships (16)

1933 1934 1935 1938 1939 1941 1941 1944 1946 1986 1989 1990 1997 2000 2005 2008 2011

Conference championships (11)

1956 1958 1959 1961 1962 1963 1986 1990 2000 2007 2011

League championships (8)

1927 1934 1938 1956 1986 (XXI) 1990 (XXV) 2007 (XLII) 2011 (XLVI)

Retired numbers

1 4 7 11 14 14 16 32 40 42 50 56

Ring of Honor

Jessie Armstead Carl Banks Tiki Barber Mark Bavaro Al Blozis Rosey Brown Harry Carson Charlie Conerly Frank Gifford Pete Gogolak Mel Hein Jim Lee Howell Sam Huff Dave Jennings Tuffy Leemans Dick Lynch Jack Mara Tim Mara Wellington Mara George Martin Joe Morrison Charlie Conerly Steve Owen Bill Parcells Andy Robustelli Phil Simms Michael Strahan Ken Strong Lawrence Taylor Bob Tisch Y. A. Tittle Amani Toomer Emlen Tunnell Brad Van Pelt Alex Webster George Young Tom Coughlin Michael Strahan Justin Tuck Ernie Accorsi

Media

Broadcasters Radio network Bob Papa Carl Banks Howard Cross

Current league affiliations

League: National Football League Conference: National Football Conference Division: East Division

Seasons (93)

1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Championship seasons in bold

v t e

Football stadiums of the Ivy League

Brown Stadium
Stadium
(Brown) Wien Stadium
Stadium
(Columbia) Schoellkopf Field
Schoellkopf Field
(Cornell) Memorial Field (Dartmouth) Harvard Stadium
Stadium
(Harvard) Franklin Field
Franklin Field
(Penn) Princeton Stadium
Stadium
(Princeton) Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
(Yale)

v t e

U.S. National Register of Historic Places

Topics

Architectural style categories Contributing property Historic district History of the National Register of Historic Places Keeper of the Register National Park Service Property types

Lists by states

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Lists by insular areas

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Lists by associated states

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Other areas

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Portal

v t e

College football
College football
venues in Connecticut

Division I FBS

American Athletic

Rentschler Field (UConn)

Division I FCS

Ivy League

Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
(Yale)

Northeast

Arute Field (Central Connecticut) Campus Field (Sacred Heart)

Division II

Northeast Ten

Jess Dow Field (Southern Connecticut) Ralph F. DellaCamera Stadium
Stadium
(New Haven)

Division III

NESCAC

Andrus Field (Wesleyan) Jessee/Miller Field (Trinity)

NEWMAC

Cadet Memorial Field (Coast Guard)

NJAC

Westside Athletic Complex (Western Connecticut)

John

.