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In the geologic timescale, the Wuchiapingian or Wujiapingian (from Chinese: 吴家坪; pinyin: Wújiāpíng; literally: "Wu Family Flatland"" in the Liangshan area of Hanzhong, Shaanxi Province[2]) is an age or stage of the Permian. It is also the lower or earlier of two subdivisions of the Lopingian
Lopingian
epoch or series. The Wuchiapingian spans the time between 259.1 and 254.14 million years ago (Ma). It was preceded by the Capitanian and followed by the Changhsingian.[3] Regional stages with which the Wuchiapingian is coeval or overlaps include the Djulfian or Dzhulfian, Longtanian, Rustlerian, Saladoan, and Castilian.[4]

Contents

1 Stratigraphic definitions 2 Biodiversity 3 Fauna

3.1 Amphibians 3.2 Synapsids

4 References 5 External links

Stratigraphic definitions[edit] The Wuchiapingian was first used in 1962, when the Lopingian
Lopingian
series of southwestern China was divided in the Changhsingian and Wuchiapingian formations. In 1973 the Wuchiapingian was first used as a chronostratigraphic unit (i.e. a stage, as opposed to a formation, which is a lithostratigraphic unit).[5] The base of the Wuchiapingian stage is defined as the place in the stratigraphic record where the conodont species Clarkina postbitteri postbitteri first appears. A global reference profile for this boundary (a GSSP) is located near Laibin
Laibin
in the Chinese province of Guangxi.[6] The top of the Wuchiapingian (the base of the Changhsingian) is at the first appearance of conodont species Clarkina wangi. The Wuchiapingian contains two ammonite biozones: that of the genus Araxoceras
Araxoceras
and that of the genera Roadoceras and Doulingoceras. Biodiversity[edit] An extinction pulse occurred during the Wuchiapingian; faunas were recovering when another larger extinction pulse, the Permian– Triassic
Triassic
extinction event devastated life.[7] Fauna[edit] Amphibians[edit]

Amphibians
Amphibians
of the Wuchiapingian

Taxa Presence Location Description Images

Intasuchus

Inta Formation, Russia

Rhinesuchus

Synapsids[edit]

Synapsids
Synapsids
of the Wuchiapingian

Taxa Presence Location Description Images

Cistecephalus

Cistecephalus
Cistecephalus
Assemblage Zone; Tropidostoma Assemblage Zone, both in the Karoo Basin, South Africa and Zambia

Gorgonops

Mildenhalls, Fort Beaufort; Karoo Basin, Beaufort West, both in South Africa, possibly Chiwera Beds, Malawi

References[edit]

^ http://www.stratigraphy.org/index.php/ics-chart-timescale ^ "陕西汉中梁山吴家坪灰岩的再研究 (Restudies on the Wujiaping Limestone Liangshan of Hanzhong, Shaanxi)". Retrieved 29 November 2012.  ^ Gradstein, F. M.; Ogg, J. G. & Smith, A. G.; 2004: A Geologic Time Scale 2004, Cambridge University
Cambridge University
Press ^ "Wuchiapingian". GeoWhen Database, International Commission on Stratigraphy (ICS). Retrieved 4 March 2010.  ^ Kanmera, Kametoshi; and Nakazawa, Keiji, 1973, Permian-Triassic relationships and faunal changes in the eastern Tethys, in Logan, A.; and Hills, L. V.; eds.; The Permian
Permian
and Triassic
Triassic
Systems and their mutual boundary, Canadian Society of Petroleum Geologists, Memoir 2, pp. 100–129 ^ Jin, Y.; Shen, S.; Henderson, C. M.; Wang, X.; Wang, W.; Wang, Y.; Cao, C. & Shang, Q.; 2006: The Global Stratotype Section and Point (GSSP) for the boundary between the Capitanian and Wuchiapingian Stage (Permian), Episodes 29(4), pp. 253–262 ^ Sahney, S. & Benton, M.J. (2008). "Recovery from the most profound mass extinction of all time" (PDF). Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences. 275 (1636): 759–65. doi:10.1098/rspb.2007.1370. PMC 2596898 . PMID 18198148. 

External links[edit]

GeoWhen Database - Wuchiapingian Upper Paleozoic
Paleozoic
stratigraphic chart at the website of the subcommission for stratigraphic information of the ICS

Coordinates: 23°41′43″N 109°19′16″E / 23.6953°N 109.3211°E / 23.6953; 109.3211

v t e

Geologic history of Earth

Cenozoic
Cenozoic
era¹ (present–66.0 Mya)

Quaternary
Quaternary
(present–2.588 Mya)

Holocene
Holocene
(present–11.784 kya) Pleistocene
Pleistocene
(11.784 kya–2.588 Mya)

Neogene
Neogene
(2.588–23.03 Mya)

Pliocene
Pliocene
(2.588–5.333 Mya) Miocene
Miocene
(5.333–23.03 Mya)

Paleogene (23.03–66.0 Mya)

Oligocene
Oligocene
(23.03–33.9 Mya) Eocene
Eocene
(33.9–56.0 Mya) Paleocene
Paleocene
(56.0–66.0 Mya)

Mesozoic
Mesozoic
era¹ (66.0–251.902 Mya)

Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(66.0–145.0 Mya)

Late (66.0–100.5 Mya) Early (100.5–145.0 Mya)

Jurassic
Jurassic
(145.0–201.3 Mya)

Late (145.0–163.5 Mya) Middle (163.5–174.1 Mya) Early (174.1–201.3 Mya)

Triassic
Triassic
(201.3–251.902 Mya)

Late (201.3–237 Mya) Middle (237–247.2 Mya) Early (247.2–251.902 Mya)

Paleozoic
Paleozoic
era¹ (251.902–541.0 Mya)

Permian
Permian
(251.902–298.9 Mya)

Lopingian
Lopingian
(251.902–259.8 Mya) Guadalupian
Guadalupian
(259.8–272.3 Mya) Cisuralian
Cisuralian
(272.3–298.9 Mya)

Carboniferous
Carboniferous
(298.9–358.9 Mya)

Pennsylvanian (298.9–323.2 Mya) Mississippian (323.2–358.9 Mya)

Devonian
Devonian
(358.9–419.2 Mya)

Late (358.9–382.7 Mya) Middle (382.7–393.3 Mya) Early (393.3–419.2 Mya)

Silurian
Silurian
(419.2–443.8 Mya)

Pridoli (419.2–423.0 Mya) Ludlow (423.0–427.4 Mya) Wenlock (427.4–433.4 Mya) Llandovery (433.4–443.8 Mya)

Ordovician
Ordovician
(443.8–485.4 Mya)

Late (443.8–458.4 Mya) Middle (458.4–470.0 Mya) Early (470.0–485.4 Mya)

Cambrian
Cambrian
(485.4–541.0 Mya)

Furongian (485.4–497 Mya) Series 3 (497–509 Mya) Series 2 (509–521 Mya) Terreneuvian
Terreneuvian
(521–541.0 Mya)

Proterozoic
Proterozoic
eon² (541.0 Mya–2.5 Gya)

Neoproterozoic era (541.0 Mya–1 Gya)

Ediacaran
Ediacaran
(541.0-~635 Mya) Cryogenian (~635-~720 Mya) Tonian (~720 Mya-1 Gya)

Mesoproterozoic era (1–1.6 Gya)

Stenian (1-1.2 Gya) Ectasian (1.2-1.4 Gya) Calymmian (1.4-1.6 Gya)

Paleoproterozoic era (1.6–2.5 Gya)

Statherian (1.6-1.8 Gya) Orosirian
Orosirian
(1.8-2.05 Gya) Rhyacian (2.05-2.3 Gya) Siderian
Siderian
(2.3-2.5 Gya)

Archean
Archean
eon² (2.5–4 Gya)

Eras

Neoarchean (2.5–2.8 Gya) Mesoarchean (2.8–3.2 Gya) Paleoarchean
Paleoarchean
(3.2–3.6 Gya) Eoarchean
Eoarchean
(3.6–4 Gya)

Hadean
Hadean
eon² (4–4.6 Gya)

 

 

kya = thousands years ago. Mya = millions years ago. Gya = billions years ago.¹ = Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
eon. ² = Precambrian
Precambrian
supereon. Source: (2017/02). International Commission on Stratigraphy. Retrieved 13 July 2015. Divisions of Geologic Time—Major Chronostratigraphic and Geochronologic Units USGS Retrieved 10

.