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The United Nations
United Nations
Children's Fund[3] ( UNICEF
UNICEF
/ˈjuːnɪsɛf/)[4] is a United Nations
United Nations
(UN) program headquartered in New York City
New York City
that provides humanitarian and developmental assistance to children and mothers in developing countries. It is a member of the United Nations Development Group. The United Nations
United Nations
International Children's Emergency Fund was created by the United Nations
United Nations
General Assembly on the 11th of December 1946, to provide emergency food and healthcare to children in countries that had been devastated by World War II. The Polish physician Ludwik Rajchman is widely regarded as the founder of UNICEF
UNICEF
and served as its first chairman from 1946. On Rajchman's suggestion, the American Maurice Pate was appointed its first executive director, serving from 1947 until his death in 1965.[5][6] In 1950, UNICEF's mandate was extended to address the long-term needs of children and women in developing countries everywhere. In 1953 it became a permanent part of the United Nations
United Nations
System, and the words "international" and "emergency" were dropped from the organization's name, making it simply the United Nations
United Nations
Children's Fund, retaining the original acronym, "UNICEF".[3] UNICEF
UNICEF
relies on contributions from governments and private donors, UNICEF's total income for 2015 was US$5,009,557,471.[2] Governments contribute two-thirds of the organization's resources. Private groups and individuals contribute the rest through national committees. It is estimated that 92 per cent of UNICEF
UNICEF
revenue is distributed to program services.[7] UNICEF's programs emphasize developing community-level services to promote the health and well-being of children. UNICEF
UNICEF
was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
in 1965 and the Prince of Asturias Award of Concord in 2006. Most of UNICEF's work is in the field, with a presence in 190 countries and territories. UNICEF's network of over 150 country offices, headquarters and other offices, and 34 National Committees carry out UNICEF's mission through programs developed with host governments. Seven regional offices provide technical assistance to country offices as needed. UNICEF's Supply Division is based in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
and serves as the primary point of distribution for such essential items as vaccines, antiretroviral medicines for children and mothers with HIV, nutritional supplements, emergency shelters, family reunification, and educational supplies. A 36-member executive board establishes policies, approves programs and oversees administrative and financial plans. The executive board is made up of government representatives who are elected by the United Nations
United Nations
Economic and Social Council, usually for three-year terms.

Contents

1 Governance 2 UNICEF
UNICEF
national committees 3 Promotion and fundraising 4 Sponsorship

4.1 UNICEF
UNICEF
Kid Power 4.2 Trick-or-Treat UNICEF
UNICEF
box 4.3 Cartoons for Children's Rights 4.4 Corporate partnership 4.5 Corporate Social Responsibility 4.6 Girl Star 4.7 Kids United

5 Celebrity ambassadors 6 Facilities

6.1 UNICEF
UNICEF
World Warehouse 6.2 UNICEF
UNICEF
Innocenti Research Centre

7 Controversies

7.1 Adoption program 7.2 Infant mortality 7.3 NSA surveillance

8 See also 9 References 10 External links

Governance[edit] Each country office carries out UNICEF's mission through a unique program of cooperation developed with the host government. This five-year program focuses on practical ways to realize the rights of children and women. Regional offices guide this work and provide technical assistance to country offices as needed. Overall management and administration of the organization takes place at headquarters, where global policy on children is shaped. Guiding and monitoring all of UNICEF's work is a 36-member Executive Board made up of government representatives. They establish policies, approve programs and decide on administrative and financial plans and budgets. Executive Board’s work is coordinated by the Bureau, comprising the President and four Vice-Presidents(Total 5), each officer representing one of the five regional groups. These five officers, each one representing one of the five regional groups, are elected by the Executive Board each year from among its members, with the presidency rotating among the regional groups on an annual basis. As a matter of custom, permanent members of the Security Council do not serve as officers of the Executive Board. Office of the Secretary of the Executive Board supports and services the Executive Board. It is responsible for maintaining an effective relationship between the Executive Board and the UNICEF
UNICEF
secretariat, and helps to organize the field visits of the Executive Board.[8][9][10]

UNICEF
UNICEF
School in a box contains basic educational items for one teacher and 40 students

UNICEF
UNICEF
national committees[edit] See also: List of UNICEF
UNICEF
National Committees There are national committees in 34 [industrialized] countries, each established as an independent local non-governmental organization. The national committees raise funds from the private sector. UNICEF
UNICEF
is funded entirely by voluntary contributions,[11] and the National Committees collectively raise around one-third of UNICEF's annual income. This comes through contributions from corporations, civil society organizations around six million individual donors worldwide. Promotion and fundraising[edit] In the United States, Canada
Canada
and some other countries, UNICEF
UNICEF
is known for its "Trick-Or-Treat for UNICEF" program in which children collect money for UNICEF
UNICEF
from the houses they trick-or-treat on Halloween night, sometimes instead of candy. UNICEF
UNICEF
is present in 191 countries and territories around the world, but not involved in nine others (Bahamas, Brunei, Cyprus, Latvia, Liechtenstein, Malta, Mauritius, Monaco, and Singapore).[12] Many people in developed countries first hear about UNICEF's work through the activities of one of the 36 National Committees for UNICEF. These non-governmental organizations (NGO) are primarily responsible for fundraising, selling UNICEF
UNICEF
greeting cards and products, creating private and public partnerships, advocating for children's rights, and providing other support. The US Fund for UNICEF is the oldest of the national committees, founded in 1947.[13] On 19 April 2007, Grand Duchess Maria Teresa of Luxembourg
Grand Duchess Maria Teresa of Luxembourg
was appointed UNICEF
UNICEF
Eminent Advocate for Children,[14] in which role she has visited Brazil (2007),[15] China (2008),[16] and Burundi (2009).[17] In 2009, the British retailer Tesco
Tesco
used "Change for Good" as advertising, which is trademarked by UNICEF
UNICEF
for charity usage but not for commercial or retail use. This prompted the agency to say, "it is the first time in Unicef's history that a commercial entity has purposely set out to capitalise on one of our campaigns and subsequently damage an income stream which several of our programs for children are dependent on". They went on to call on the public "who have children’s welfare at heart, to consider carefully who they support when making consumer choices".[18][19] Sponsorship[edit]

Lionel Messi
Lionel Messi
who is wearing a Barcelona shirt showing the UNICEF
UNICEF
logo

On 7 September 2006, an agreement between UNICEF
UNICEF
and the Spanish Catalan association football club FC Barcelona
FC Barcelona
was reached whereby the club would donate 1.5 million Euros per year to the organization for five years. As part of the agreement, FC Barcelona
FC Barcelona
would wear the UNICEF
UNICEF
logo on the front of their uniforms in the colour yellow (as seen in the picture on the right of Lionel Messi).[20] This was the first time a football club sponsored an organization rather than the other way around. It was also the first time in FC Barcelona's history that they have had another organization's name across the front of their uniform. In January 2007 UNICEF
UNICEF
struck a partnership with Canada's national tent pegging team. The team was officially re-flagged as " UNICEF
UNICEF
Team Canada", and its riders wear UNICEF's logo in competition, and team members promote and raise funds for UNICEF's campaign against childhood HIV-AIDS.[21] When the team became the 2008 tent pegging world champions, UNICEF's flag was raised alongside the Canadian flag at the games, the first time in the history of international Grand Prix equestrian competition that a non-state flag has flown over the medal podium.[22] The Swedish club Hammarby IF
Hammarby IF
followed the Spanish and Canadian lead on 14 April 2007,[23] also raising funds for UNICEF
UNICEF
and displaying the UNICEF
UNICEF
name on their sportswear. The Danish football club Brøndby IF participated in a similar arrangement from 2008 to 2013.[24] Australian A-League
A-League
club Sydney FC
Sydney FC
announced they would also enter into a partnership with UNICEF
UNICEF
raising funds for children in the Asia-Pacific
Asia-Pacific
region, and would also display the UNICEF
UNICEF
logo for the remainder of the 2011-12 A-League
A-League
season.[25] Race driver Jacques Villeneuve
Jacques Villeneuve
has occasionally placed the UNICEF
UNICEF
logo on the #27 Bill Davis Racing
Bill Davis Racing
pickup truck in the NASCAR
NASCAR
Craftsman Truck Series. In Botswana, UNICEF
UNICEF
has funded the development of new state-of-the-art HIV/AIDS education for every schoolchild in Botswana
Botswana
from nonprofit organization TeachAIDS.[26] UNICEF
UNICEF
announced a landmark partnership with Scottish club Rangers F.C. UNICEF
UNICEF
partnered with the Rangers Charity Foundation and pledged to raise £300,000 by 2011.[27] In 2010, UNICEF
UNICEF
created a partnership with Phi Iota Alpha, making them the first Greek Lettered Organization UNICEF
UNICEF
has ever worked with. In 2011, Phi Iota Alpha
Phi Iota Alpha
raised over $20,000 for the Tap Project and the Trick or Treats for UNICEF
UNICEF
Campaign. In 2013, they agreed a contract with Greek association football champions Olympiacos F.C.
Olympiacos F.C.
who will show the organization's logo on the front of their shirts. UNICEF
UNICEF
Kid Power[edit] Main article: UNICEF
UNICEF
Kid Power Started in 2015, Kid Power is a division of UNICEF
UNICEF
that was created as an effort to involve kids in helping other kids in need. UNICEF
UNICEF
Kid Power developed the world’s first Wearable for Good,[28] called Kid Power Bands,[29] which is a kids’ fitness tracker bracelet that connects to a smartphone app. The app lets users complete missions, which counts total steps and awards points. The points then unlock funding from partners, which is then used by UNICEF
UNICEF
to deliver lifesaving packets of therapeutic food to severely malnourished children around the world. Trick-or-Treat UNICEF
UNICEF
box[edit] Main article: Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF Since 1950, when a group of children in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, donated $17 which they received on Halloween
Halloween
to help post-World War II victims, the Trick-or-Treat UNICEF
UNICEF
box has become a tradition in North America during the fall.[30] These small orange boxes are handed to children at schools and other locations before 31 October. As of 2012[update], the Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF
Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF
campaign has collected approximately CAD 91 million in Canada
Canada
and over US$167 million in the U.S.[31] Cartoons for Children's Rights[edit] Main article: Cartoons for Children's Rights In 1994, UNICEF
UNICEF
held a summit encouraging animation studios around the world to create individual animated spots demonstrating the international rights of children. Cartoons for Children's Rights is the collection of animated shorts based on UNICEF’s Convention on the Rights of the Child. Corporate partnership[edit] To raise money to support its Education and Literacy Programs, UNICEF collaborates with companies worldwide – international as well as small- and medium-sized businesses. Since 2004, the organization has been supported by Montblanc, working collaboratively to help the world's children getting better access to education.[32] According to Vaccine News Daily, Merck & Co. partnered with UNICEF in June 2013 to decrease maternal mortality, HIV
HIV
and tuberculosis prevalence in South Africa. Merck's program "Merck for Mothers" will give US$500 million worldwide for programs that improve health for expectant mothers and their children.[33] In May 2010, Crucell
Crucell
N.V. announced an additional US$110 million award from UNICEF
UNICEF
to supply its pentavalent pediatric vaccine Quinvaxem to the developing world.[34] Corporate Social Responsibility[edit] UNICEF
UNICEF
works directly with companies to improve their business practices, bringing them in line with obligations under international law, and ensuring that they respect children's rights in the realms of the marketplace, workplace, and the community. In 2012, UNICEF
UNICEF
worked with Save the Children and The United Nations
United Nations
Global Compact to develop the Children's Rights and Business Principles and now these guidelines form the basis UNICEF's advice to companies. UNICEF
UNICEF
works with companies seeking to improve their social sustainability by guiding them through a due diligence process where issues throughout their supply chain, such as child labor, can be identified and actions to ratify them are put in place.[35] Girl Star[edit] The Girl Star[36] project is a series of films which documents stories of girls from the most disadvantaged communities across five northern states in India who, through via education, have managed to break socio-economic constraints to make a success of their lives and become self-sufficient. These young women have grown to become role models in their communities, inspiring younger girls to go to school and continue their education. They have selected professions from the most conventional such as teaching and nursing, to the most unconventional like archery, bee-keeping, scrap management[clarification needed], often entering what has traditionally been a man’s domain. Girl Star is also one of UNICEF’s most known projects. Kids United[edit] Kids United is a French musical group of four children (six children when the group was formed) born between 2000 and 2007. It has been created to support UNICEF
UNICEF
campaigns and is sponsored by Hélène Ségara and Corneille, two Francophone
Francophone
singers. The first album Un monde meilleur (A better world) was launched on Universal Children's Day in 2015, it received gold certification in France.[1] The second album Tout le bonheur du monde was even certified 2x platinum. Celebrity ambassadors[edit] Main article: List of UNICEF
UNICEF
Goodwill Ambassadors UNICEF
UNICEF
Ambassadors are leaders in the entertainment industry, representing the fields of film, television, music, sports and beyond. They help raise awareness of the needs of children, and use their talent and fame to fund-raise, advocate, and educate on behalf of UNICEF.[37] Facilities[edit]

One of the gates to the old UNICEF
UNICEF
World Warehouse

The UNICEF
UNICEF
research centre in Florence

UNICEF
UNICEF
World Warehouse[edit] The old UNICEF
UNICEF
World Warehouse is a large facility in Denmark, which hosts UNICEF
UNICEF
deliverable goods as well as co-hosts emergency goods for United Nations
United Nations
High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC). Until 2012 the facilities was a 25,000m2 warehouse at Marmormolen in Copenhagen. With construction of a 45,000m2 UN City that is to house all UN activities in Copenhagen
Copenhagen
under one roof,[38] the warehouse service has been relocated to outer parts of the Freeport of Copenhagen. The facility houses the UNICEF
UNICEF
Supply Division which manages strategic transport hubs in Dubai, Panama
Panama
and Shanghai.[39] The warehouse contains a variety of items, e.g., food supplements, water purification tablets, dietary and vitamin supplements, and the "School in a box" (illustrated above). UNICEF
UNICEF
Innocenti Research Centre[edit] The UNICEF
UNICEF
Innocenti Research Centre in Florence, Italy, was established in 1988. The centre, formally known as the International Child
Child
Development Centres, has as its prime objectives to improve international understanding of issues relating to children's rights, to promote economic policies that advance the cause of children, and to help facilitate the full implementation of the United Nations Convention on the Rights of the Child
Child
in industrialized and developing countries. The program for 2006–2008 was approved by UNICEF
UNICEF
Executive Board in September 2005.

This section needs to be updated. Please update this article to reflect recent events or newly available information. (August 2015)

It reaffirms the centre's academic freedom and the focus of IRC's research on knowledge gaps, emerging questions and sensitive issues which are relevant to the realization of children's rights, in developing and industrialized countries. It capitalizes on IRC's role as an interface between UNICEF
UNICEF
field experience, international experts, research networks and policy makers and is designed to strengthen the centre's institutional collaboration with regional academic and policy institutions, pursuing the following goals:

Generation and communication of strategic and influential knowledge on issues affecting children and the realization of their rights; Knowledge exchange and brokering; Support to UNICEF's advocacy, policy's and program development in support of the Millennium Agenda Securing and strengthening the centre's institutional and financial basis.

Three interrelated strategies guide the achievement of these goals:

Evidence-based analysis drawing on quantitative and qualitative information, the application of appropriate methodologies, and the development of recommendations to assess and inform advocacy and policy action. Enhanced partnerships with research and policy institutions and development actors, globally and at regional level, in developing and industrialized countries. Communication and leveraging of research findings and recommendations to support policy development and advocacy initiatives through strategic dissemination of studies and contribution to relevant events and fora.[40]

Controversies[edit] Adoption program[edit] UNICEF
UNICEF
has a policy preferring orphanages only be used as temporary accommodation for children when there is no alternative. UNICEF
UNICEF
has historically opposed the creation of large-scale, permanent orphanages for children, preferring instead to find children places in their (extended) families and communities, wherever possible. This has led UNICEF
UNICEF
to be skeptical of international adoption efforts as a solution to child care problems in developing countries; UNICEF
UNICEF
has preferred to see children cared for in their birth countries rather than be adopted by foreign parents.[41][42] Major news outlets such as US News have asserted UNICEF's intervention that on giving large cash payments to developing countries can lead to a cessation of international adoptions until all of its recommendations are in place, and have even labeled UNICEF
UNICEF
a "villain" for the extent of its negative impact on orphans.[43] Elizabeth Bartholet and Paulo Barrozo have written in this context, encouraging adoption protocols to take on a more child-centric viewpoint.[citation needed] Infant mortality[edit] One concern is that the child mortality rate has not decreased in some areas as rapidly as had been planned, especially in Sub-Saharan Africa, where in 2013 "the region still has the highest child mortality rate: 92 deaths per 1000 live births".[44] and that "Globally, nearly half of under-five deaths are attributable to undernutrition." In 2005, Richard Horton editor-in-chief of The Lancet, editorialized that "over 60% of these deaths were and remain preventable" and that the coverage levels for these interventions are "appallingly low in the 42 countries that account for 90% of child deaths".[45] NSA surveillance[edit] Further information: Global surveillance disclosure Documents released by Edward Snowden
Edward Snowden
in December 2013 showed that UNICEF
UNICEF
was among the surveillance targets of British and American intelligence agencies.[46] See also[edit]

United Nations
United Nations
portal Hunger relief portal

Afghan New Beginnings Programme Alliance for Healthy Cities Awaaz do
Awaaz do
– India Facts for Life Integrated Management of Childhood Illness James P. Grant, who was the third executive director of UNICEF Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey, statistical monitoring program of UNICEF Music for UNICEF
UNICEF
Concert Odisha State Child
Child
Protection Society Unite for Children, Unite Against AIDS Voices of Youth RapidSMS
RapidSMS
(co-developed by UNICEF) Children in emergencies and conflicts Refugee children Child
Child
marriage

References[edit]

^ "Secretary General Appoints Henrietta H. Fore of United States Executive Director, United Nations
United Nations
Children's Fund Meetings Coverage and Press Releases". www.un.org. 22 December 2017.  ^ a b UNICEF
UNICEF
Annual Report 2015. unicef.org ^ a b "About UNICEF
UNICEF
- FAQ". UNICEF. What does the acronym UNICEF
UNICEF
stand for?. Retrieved 4 April 2017.  ^ "UNICEF", Dictionary.com Unbaridged, retrieved 2009-06-04  ^ Y. Beigbeder, New Challenges for UNICEF: Children, Women and Human Rights (p. 12), Springer, 2001, ISBN 9780230595576 ^ "Fifty years for children". Retrieved 9 July 2015.  ^ Charity Navigator Rating – United States
United States
Fund for UNICEF. Charitynavigator.org. Retrieved on 2012-03-26. ^ "How UNICEF
UNICEF
works". UNICEF. Retrieved 2017-06-06.  ^ "Home". UNICEF. Retrieved 2017-06-06.  ^ "Bureau". UNICEF. Retrieved 2017-06-06.  ^ Presentation – UNICEF’s Resource Development Architecture Key Trends and Challenges. UNICEF. Retrieved on 2014-10-21. ^ "Information by country". UNICEF. 2014-03-17. Retrieved 2014-08-03.  ^ US Fund for UNICEF, unicefusa.org Archived October 24, 2007, at the Wayback Machine. ^ Press center – HRH Grand Duchess of Luxembourg becomes Eminent Advocate for Children. UNICEF. Retrieved on 2012-03-26. ^ Brazil – UNICEF
UNICEF
Eminent Advocate for Children visits AIDS projects in São Paulo. UNICEF. Retrieved on 2012-03-26. ^ China – Summer camp aims to help children in China affected by AIDS. UNICEF. Retrieved on 2012-03-26. ^ Burundi – Grand Duchess Maria Teresa of Luxembourg
Grand Duchess Maria Teresa of Luxembourg
visits Burundi. UNICEF. Retrieved on 2012-03-26. ^ "Unicef accuses Tesco
Tesco
of misusing charity slogan". The Irish Times, July 25, 2009 (2009-07-07). Retrieved on 2012-03-26. ^ Tesco
Tesco
in clash with Unicef – Irish, Business. Independent.ie. July 26, 2009. Retrieved on 2012-03-26. ^ "Futbol Club Barcelona, UNICEF
UNICEF
team up for children in global partnership". UNICEF. 7 September 2006.  ^ UNICEF
UNICEF
Team Canada, maharaj.org ^ Newstrack India "International Tent Pegging", January 14, 2008 ^ UNICEF, Hammarby strikes partnership, hammarbyfotboll.se (in Swedish) ^ "UNICEF". Retrieved 9 July 2015.  ^ " Sydney FC
Sydney FC
and UNICEF
UNICEF
do the rights things to improve child rights throughout Asia". UNICEF. 20 February 2012. Retrieved 24 February 2012.  ^ " UNICEF
UNICEF
funds TeachAIDS
TeachAIDS
work in Botswana". TeachAIDS. 2 June 2010. Retrieved 16 December 2010.  ^ "International Charity Partner – UNICEF". Rangers Charity Foundation. 10 September 2010. Retrieved 4 May 2011.  ^ "Digital Humanitarian Missions: UNICEF
UNICEF
Kid Power". Wired Magazine.  ^ " UNICEF Kid Power Bands". UNICEF
UNICEF
Kid Power.  ^ Smylie, James H. (2001-01-01). "Presbyterians initiated UNICEF's 'Trick-or-Treat' program 50 years ago". The Presbyterian Outlook. Archived from the original on 2010-11-28.  ^ "Trick-or-Treat for UNICEF". unicefusa.org. Archived from the original on 23 April 2013.  ^ "Montblanc UNICEF's corporate partnerships". UNICEF. Retrieved 2014-08-03.  ^ Rogers, Emma (June 4, 2013). "Merck for Mothers contributes to UNICEF's South African efforts". Vaccine News Daily. Retrieved 6 June 2013.  ^ " Crucell
Crucell
announces new award of $110 million for paediatric vaccine Quinvaxem by UNICEF". Leiden Bio Science Park. May 10, 2010. Archived from the original on August 8, 2014.  ^ "Corporate Social Responsibility - Home". UNICEF. Retrieved 2014-08-03.  ^ " UNICEF
UNICEF
India - Media centre - Girl Star Project". Unicef.org. 2007-11-22. Retrieved 2014-08-03.  ^ " UNICEF
UNICEF
Ambassadors". UNICEF: United States
United States
Fund. UNICEF. Retrieved 28 April 2016.  ^ By & Havn. "FN Byen" (in Danish). Archived from the original on 2012-09-01. Retrieved 2012-07-06.  ^ " Copenhagen
Copenhagen
warehouse - Supplies and Logistics - UNICEF". UNICEF. 5 June 2015. Retrieved 9 July 2015.  ^ Innocenti Research Centre, UNICEF-irc.org ^ Bartholet article on human rights and adoption ^ "Both Ends Burning". Retrieved 9 July 2015.  ^ Peter Roff. "Bureaucracy Keeps Adopted Children Stuck in International Limbo - US News". US News & World Report. Retrieved 9 July 2015.  ^ Danzhen You, Lucia Hug and Yao Chen, "Levels and Trends in Child Mortality: Report 2014: Estimates Developed by the UN Interagency Group for Child
Child
mortality Estimation" Archived 2015-08-14 at the Wayback Machine.. Published by the United Nations
United Nations
Children's Fund, The World Bank, the World Health Organization
World Health Organization
and the United Nations Population Division, 2014. Retrieved August 1, 2015. p. 1. ^ Horton, Richard (2004). " UNICEF
UNICEF
leadership 2005–2015: a call for strategic change". The Lancet. 364 (9451): 2071–2074. doi:10.1016/S0140-6736(04)17560-0. PMID 15589292.  ^ GCHQ and NSA targeted charities, Germans, Israeli PM and EU chief The Guardian 20 December 2013

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to UNICEF ( United Nations
United Nations
Children's Fund).

Official UNICEF
UNICEF
website United Nations
United Nations
Rule of Law: The United Nations
United Nations
Children's Fund, on the rule of law work conducted by the United Nations
United Nations
Children Fund. UN Practitioner's Portal
Portal
on HRBA Programming Resources on rights of the child, UN centralised webportal on the Human Rights-Based Approach to Development Programming.

Awards and achievements

Preceded by Martin Luther King, Jr. Nobel Peace Prize
Nobel Peace Prize
Laureate 1965 Succeeded by René Cassin 1968

v t e

Laureates of the Nobel Peace Prize

1901–1925

1901 Henry Dunant / Frédéric Passy 1902 Élie Ducommun / Charles Gobat 1903 Randal Cremer 1904 Institut de Droit International 1905 Bertha von Suttner 1906 Theodore Roosevelt 1907 Ernesto Moneta / Louis Renault 1908 Klas Arnoldson / Fredrik Bajer 1909 A. M. F. Beernaert / Paul Estournelles de Constant 1910 International Peace Bureau 1911 Tobias Asser / Alfred Fried 1912 Elihu Root 1913 Henri La Fontaine 1914 1915 1916 1917 International Committee of the Red Cross 1918 1919 Woodrow Wilson 1920 Léon Bourgeois 1921 Hjalmar Branting / Christian Lange 1922 Fridtjof Nansen 1923 1924 1925 Austen Chamberlain / Charles Dawes

1926–1950

1926 Aristide Briand / Gustav Stresemann 1927 Ferdinand Buisson / Ludwig Quidde 1928 1929 Frank B. Kellogg 1930 Nathan Söderblom 1931 Jane Addams / Nicholas Butler 1932 1933 Norman Angell 1934 Arthur Henderson 1935 Carl von Ossietzky 1936 Carlos Saavedra Lamas 1937 Robert Cecil 1938 Nansen International Office for Refugees 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 International Committee of the Red Cross 1945 Cordell Hull 1946 Emily Balch / John Mott 1947 Friends Service Council / American Friends Service Committee 1948 1949 John Boyd Orr 1950 Ralph Bunche

1951–1975

1951 Léon Jouhaux 1952 Albert Schweitzer 1953 George Marshall 1954 United Nations
United Nations
High Commissioner for Refugees 1955 1956 1957 Lester B. Pearson 1958 Georges Pire 1959 Philip Noel-Baker 1960 Albert Lutuli 1961 Dag Hammarskjöld 1962 Linus Pauling 1963 International Committee of the Red Cross / League of Red Cross Societies 1964 Martin Luther King Jr. 1965 UNICEF 1966 1967 1968 René Cassin 1969 International Labour Organization 1970 Norman Borlaug 1971 Willy Brandt 1972 1973 Lê Đức Thọ (declined award) / Henry Kissinger 1974 Seán MacBride / Eisaku Satō 1975 Andrei Sakharov

1976–2000

1976 Betty Williams / Mairead Corrigan 1977 Amnesty International 1978 Anwar Sadat / Menachem Begin 1979 Mother
Mother
Teresa 1980 Adolfo Pérez Esquivel 1981 United Nations
United Nations
High Commissioner for Refugees 1982 Alva Myrdal / Alfonso García Robles 1983 Lech Wałęsa 1984 Desmond Tutu 1985 International Physicians for the Prevention of Nuclear War 1986 Elie Wiesel 1987 Óscar Arias 1988 UN Peacekeeping
Peacekeeping
Forces 1989 Tenzin Gyatso (14th Dalai Lama) 1990 Mikhail Gorbachev 1991 Aung San Suu Kyi 1992 Rigoberta Menchú 1993 Nelson Mandela / F. W. de Klerk 1994 Shimon Peres / Yitzhak Rabin / Yasser Arafat 1995 Pugwash Conferences / Joseph Rotblat 1996 Carlos Belo / José Ramos-Horta 1997 International Campaign to Ban Landmines / Jody Williams 1998 John Hume / David Trimble 1999 Médecins Sans Frontières 2000 Kim Dae-jung

2001–present

2001 United Nations / Kofi Annan 2002 Jimmy Carter 2003 Shirin Ebadi 2004 Wangari Maathai 2005 International Atomic Energy Agency / Mohamed ElBaradei 2006 Grameen Bank / Muhammad Yunus 2007 Al Gore / Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change 2008 Martti Ahtisaari 2009 Barack Obama 2010 Liu Xiaobo 2011 Ellen Johnson Sirleaf / Leymah Gbowee / Tawakkol Karman 2012 European Union 2013 Organisation for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons 2014 Kailash Satyarthi / Malala Yousafzai 2015 Tunisian National Dialogue Quartet 2016 Juan Manuel Santos 2017 International Campaign to Abolish Nuclear Weapons

Links to related articles

v t e

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António Guterres, Secretary-General Amina J. Mohammed, Deputy Secretary-General Miroslav Lajčák, General Assembly President

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WorldCat Identities VIAF: 154182010 LCCN: n79093850 ISNI: 0000 0001 2189 1912 GND: 2023668-2 SELIBR: 133407 SUDOC: 026437228 BNF: cb118684944 (data) NLA: 35561200 NDL: 00288570 NKC: kn20010711466 B

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