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Anthony Richard Conigliaro (January 7, 1945 – February 24, 1990), nicknamed "Tony C" and "Conig",[1][2] was a Major League Baseball outfielder and right-handed batter who played for the Boston Red Sox (1964–67, 1969–1970, 1975) and California Angels
California Angels
(1971). He was born in Revere, Massachusetts, and was a 1962 graduate of St. Mary's High School in Lynn, Massachusetts. During the Red Sox "Impossible Dream" season of 1967, he was hit in the face by a pitch, causing a severe eye injury and derailing his career. Though he would make a comeback from the injury, his career was not the same afterwards.

Contents

1 Baseball career 2 Final years 3 Conigliaro's Corner 4 Bibliography 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Baseball career[edit] Conigliaro was signed by the Red Sox in 1962, at the age of 17. In 1963, he batted .363 with 24 home runs playing for the Wellsville Red Sox in the New York–Penn League,[3] after which he was called up to the majors. During his 1964 rookie season, Conigliaro batted .290 with 24 home runs and 52 RBI in 111 games, but broke his arm and his toes in August. In his first at-bat in Fenway Park, Conigliaro hit a towering home run in the second inning against the White Sox. In his sophomore season in 1965, Conigliaro led the league in home runs (32), becoming the youngest home run champion in American League history. He was selected for the All-Star Game in 1967. In that season, at age 22, he not only reached a career total of 100 home runs, but attained that milestone at the youngest age for an American League player.[4] On August 18, 1967, the Red Sox were playing the California Angels
California Angels
at Fenway Park. Conigliaro, batting against Jack Hamilton, was hit by a pitch on his left cheekbone and was carried off the field on a stretcher. He sustained a linear fracture of the left cheekbone and a dislocated jaw with severe damage to his left retina.[5] The batting helmet he was wearing did not have the protective ear-flap that has since become standard. A year and a half later, Conigliaro made a remarkable return, hitting 20 homers with 82 RBI in 141 games, earning Comeback Player of the Year honors. In 1970, he reached career-high numbers in HRs (36) and RBI (116). That season he and his brother Billy formed two-thirds of the Red Sox outfield. After a stint with the Angels in 1971, he returned to the Red Sox briefly in 1975 as a designated hitter, but was forced to retire because his eyesight had been permanently damaged. Conigliaro batted .267, with 162 home runs and 501 RBI during his 802-game Red sox career. With the Angels, he hit .222 with 4 home runs and 15 RBI in 74 games. He holds the MLB record for most home runs (24) hit by a teenage player.[6] He is the second-youngest player to hit his 100th homer (after Mel Ott), and the youngest American League player to do so.[6] Final years[edit] In September 1975, after his retirement, Conigliaro was hired by WJAR TV 10 in Providence, Rhode Island
Providence, Rhode Island
as a sports anchor; in August 1976, he moved to a similar position at KGO-TV
KGO-TV
Channel 7 in San Francisco. On January 9, 1982, Conigliaro, in Boston to interview for a broadcasting position, suffered a heart attack while being driven to the airport by his brother Billy. Shortly thereafter, he suffered a stroke and lapsed into a coma. Conigliaro remained in a vegetative state until his death more than eight years later, in February 1990, at the age of 45. In commemoration, the Red Sox wore black armbands that season. He is buried in Holy Cross Cemetery in Malden, Massachusetts.[7] Currently, the Tony Conigliaro
Tony Conigliaro
Award, instituted by the Red Sox after his death, is given annually to the MLB player who best overcomes obstacles and adversities through the attributes of spirit, determination and courage that were considered Tony's trademarks. Conigliaro's Corner[edit]

Conigliaro's Corner bleacher seating (silver) can be seen to the right of the Budweiser
Budweiser
sign in this July 2008 photo.

For the start of the 2007 season, Red Sox ownership added a new 200-seat bleacher section on the right field roof, providing an additional 16,000 available tickets for the season.[8] It was named "Conigliaro's Corner" in honor of Conigliaro. The seats were being marketed specifically towards families.[8] As of May 2007, the section was reserved for Red Sox Nation members on Saturdays and Red Sox Kid Nation members on Sundays.[8] The seats were removed prior to the start of the 2009 season. However, this little section of seats (since removed as mentioned above) high above right field in foul territory was not the original "Conig's Corner". When Tony first was making his comeback, he complained about not being able to see the ball well coming from the pitcher's hand because of all of the brightly colored clothing being worn by fans directly behind the pitcher in dead center field. To address Tony's problem, these seats were first blocked off and covered in black tarp to provide a better hitter's background, known as a batter's eye. This small triangular area of seats (bleacher sections 34 and 35) directly adjacent to the center field TV camera nest was the original Conig's Corner at Fenway Park. These same seats are still blocked off for day games for the same reason.[9] Bibliography[edit]

Conigliaro, Tony (August 1970). Seeing It Through. with Jack Zanger. Macmillan. ISBN 978-0025272903. 

See also[edit]

Baseball portal

Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
Hall of Fame List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
annual home run leaders

References[edit]

^ Time Magazine, 1969, Conig's Comeback ^ Tony Conigliaro
Tony Conigliaro
Forty Years Later: A Remembrance by Shaun L. Kelly ^ Linkugel, Wil A.; Pappas, Edward J. (July 1, 1998). They Tasted Glory: Among the Missing at the Baseball Hall of Fame. McFarland. ISBN 9780786404841.  ^ "Tony Conigliaro". Retrieved 2012-05-21.  ^ "Return From The Dark", Sports Illustrated, June 22, 1970 ^ a b "Home Run Records by Age". Baseball Almanac. Retrieved May 17, 2017.  ^ Berkow, Ira (March 3, 1990). "A Shooting Star Named Tony C". The New York Times. Retrieved May 17, 2017.  ^ a b c "Conigliaro's Corner' addition part of Fenway changes". ESPN. Associated Press. 2007-04-04.  ^ " Fenway Park
Fenway Park
Through The Years". Boston Red Sox. Retrieved 19 August 2013. 

External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors) "Little Red Scooter" via YouTube "Why Don't They Understand" via YouTube Tony Conigliaro
Tony Conigliaro
at Find a Grave

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American League
American League
season home run leaders

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Sporting News American League
American League
Comeback Player of the Year Award

1965: Cash 1966: Powell 1967: Chance 1968: Harrelson 1969: Conigliaro 1970: Wright 1971: Cash 1972: Tiant 1973: Hiller 1974: Jenkins 1975: Powell 1976: Ellis 1977: Soderholm 1978: Caldwell 1979: Horton 1980: Keough 1981: Zisk 1982: Thornton 1983: Trammell 1984: Kingman 1985: G. Thomas 1986: Candelaria 1987: Saberhagen 1988: Davis 1989: Blyleven 1990: Winfield 1991: Guzmán 1992: Sutcliffe 1993: Jackson 1994: Canseco 1995: Wakefield 1996: Elster 1997: Justice 1998: Saberhagen 1999: Jaha 2000: F. Thomas 2001: Sierra 2002: Salmon 2003: Meche 2004: Konerko 2005: Giambi 2006: Thome 2007: Peña 2008: Lee 2009: Hill 2010: Guerrero 2011: Ellsbury 2012: Dunn 2013: Rivera 2014: Young 2015: Fielder 2016: Trumbo

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Hutch Award

1965: Mantle 1966: Koufax 1967: Yastrzemski 1968: Rose 1969: Kaline 1970: Conigliaro 1971: Torre 1972: Tolan 1973: Hiller 1974: Thompson 1975: Nolan 1976: John 1977: McCovey 1978: Stargell 1979: Brock 1980: Brett 1981: Bench 1982: Thornton 1983: Knight 1984: Robinson 1985: Reuschel 1986: Leonard 1987: Molitor 1988: Oester 1989: Dravecky 1990: Bream 1991: Wegman 1992: Lansford 1993: Olerud 1994: Dawson 1995: Abbott 1996: Vizquel 1997: Davis 1998: Cone 1999: Casey 2000: Giambi 2001: Schilling 2002: Salmon 2003: Moyer 2004: Hoffman 2005: Biggio 2006: Loretta 2007: Sweeney 2008: Lester 2009: Teahen 2010: Hudson 2011: Butler 2012: Zito 2013: Ibañez 2014: Gordon 2015: Wainwright 2016: McGowan 2017: Diekman

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 14054907 LCCN: n97063917 ISNI: 0000 0000 3498 9647 SN

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