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Thruston Ballard Morton (August 19, 1907 – August 14, 1982), was a Republican who represented Kentucky
Kentucky
in the US House of Representatives and the US Senate.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Political Career

2.1 House of Representatives 2.2 Assistant Secretary of State 2.3 US Senate

3 Final years, death and legacy 4 References 5 External links

Early life[edit] Morton was born in Louisville, Kentucky, to David Morton and his wife, Mary Ballard, descended from pioneer settlers of the area. He had a brother, Rogers Clark Ballard Morton, who also became a politician (as discussed below), and a sister, Jane, who survived him. He attended local public schools then the Woodberry Forest School
Woodberry Forest School
before he entered Yale University. He received a B.A. there in 1929. Morton then worked in the family business, Ballard & Ballard Flour Milling, becoming its chairman of the board before the company was sold to the Pillsbury Company. A lifelong Episcopalian, he married Belle Clay Lyons and was survived by their two sons, Clay Lyons Morton and Thruston Ballard Morton Jr, and five grandchildren. His brother, Rogers Clark Ballard Morton, represented Maryland
Maryland
in the US House of Representatives
US House of Representatives
from 1963 through 1971, when he became Secretary of the Interior in the administration of Presidents Richard M. Nixon and Gerald R. Ford
Gerald R. Ford
and Secretary of Commerce
Secretary of Commerce
under Ford, before heading Ford's re-election campaign in 1976. Political Career[edit] House of Representatives[edit] After naval service in World War II, Morton defeated incumbent Democrat Emmet O'Neal in 1946 for his native Louisville area, 61,899 votes to 44,599. He served three terms in the House, from January 3, 1947 to January 3, 1953. Assistant Secretary of State[edit] After leaving the House, Morton served as Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Relations[1] in the administration of Dwight D. Eisenhower, garnering support for Eisenhower's foreign policy. US Senate[edit] In 1956, Morton, by a very narrow margin, defeated incumbent Democratic United States Senator Earle C. Clements, a former Kentucky governor and minority leader in the Senate, by 506,903 votes to 499,922. Morton was re-elected to a second term in the Senate in 1962, defeating the Democratic lieutenant governor and former mayor of Louisville, Wilson W. Wyatt. Morton served from January 3, 1957 until his resignation, on December 16, 1968. He vacated the seat a few weeks early to allow his successor, Marlow Cook, a fellow Republican with similar views, to gain an edge in seniority. In the Senate, Morton was considered a moderate and voted, along with his Republican colleague John Sherman Cooper
John Sherman Cooper
and most other Republicans, for the Civil Rights Act of 1964. A compromise that Morton proposed to guarantee jury trials in all criminal contempt cases except for voting rights proved, with the assistance of Senators Everett Dirksen
Everett Dirksen
and Bourke Hickenlooper, crucial in passing that Civil Rights Act.[2] Morton was the chairman of the Republican National Committee
Republican National Committee
from 1959 to 1961 and chaired the Republican National Convention
Republican National Convention
of 1964. When Morton resigned, he surprised many, who considered him at the peak of his political power. However, he opposed the Vietnam War despite being criticized by Representative William Cowger. Also, he was both depressed by the urban violence after the deaths of Martin Luther King and Robert Kennedy
Robert Kennedy
and disappointed in his party's failure to address the broader social issues. He also ultimately counseled Lyndon Johnson
Lyndon Johnson
to decline to seek re-election, and he supported the unsuccessful presidential candidacy of Nelson Rockefeller. Morton is interviewed in the 1968 documentary film In the Year of the Pig, and another interview is available through the Lyndon Baines Johnson Presidential Library.[3] Final years, death and legacy[edit] After his retirement from the Senate, Morton served as vice chairman of Liberty National Bank in Louisville, president of the American Horse Council, and chairman of the board of Churchill Downs, and he served as one of the directors of the University of Louisville, Pillsbury Company, Pittston Company, Louisville Board of Trade, Texas Gas Company, R.J. Reynolds Company, and the Ohio Valley Assembly. Morton died after many years of declining health. His brother Rogers Morton had died three years previously, and his wife, Belle, survived him by more than a decade.[4] His papers are held by Louisville's Filson Historical Society, which his grandfather had revitalized.[5] The Kentucky
Kentucky
Digital Library has a collection of his speeches.[6] References[edit]

^ Caro, Robert. The Years of Lyndon Johnson: Master of the Senate, Alfred A. Knopf, 2002, New York, p. 658 ^ Library of Congress exhibition, The Civil Rights Act of 1964 ^ http://transition.lbjlibrary.org/files/original/2817a6aad46362d07af174dd83b3a778.pdf ^ https://www.nytimes.com/1982/08/15/obituaries/thruston-b-morton-is-dead-at-74-served-as-senator-from-kentucky.html ^ http://filsonhistorical.org/research-doc/mortonthrustonb/ ^ http://kdl.kyvl.org/catalog/xt7z8w38164b/guide

External links[edit]

United States Congress. " Thruston Ballard Morton (id: M001022)". Biographical Directory of the United States Congress.  Guide to the Thruston B Morton papers, housed at the University of Kentucky
Kentucky
Libraries Special
Special
Collections Research Center

U.S. House of Representatives

Preceded by Emmet O'Neal Member of the U.S. House of Representatives from Kentucky's 3rd congressional district 1947–1953 Succeeded by John Marshall Robsion, Jr.

Government offices

Preceded by Jack K. McFall Assistant Secretary of State
Assistant Secretary of State
for Legislative Affairs January 30, 1953 – February 25, 1956 Succeeded by Robert C. Hill

U.S. Senate

Preceded by Earle C. Clements U.S. Senator (Class 3) from Kentucky January 3, 1957 – December 16, 1968 Served alongside: John Sherman Cooper Succeeded by Marlow W. Cook

Party political offices

Preceded by Meade Alcorn Chairman of the Republican National Committee 1959–1961 Succeeded by William E. Miller

Preceded by Barry Goldwater Chairman of the National Republican Senatorial Committee 1963–1967 Succeeded by George Murphy

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United States Senators from Kentucky

Class 2

Brown Thruston Clay Bibb Walker Barry Hardin Crittenden Johnson Bibb Crittenden Morehead J. Underwood Thompson Powell Guthrie McCreery Stevenson Beck Carlisle Lindsay Blackburn Paynter James Martin Stanley Sackett Robsion Williamson M. Logan Chandler Stanfill Cooper Chapman T. Underwood Cooper Barkley Humphreys Cooper Huddleston McConnell

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Edwards Marshall J. Breckinridge Adair Clay Pope Bledsoe Talbot W. Logan Talbot Rowan Clay Crittenden Metcalfe Clay Meriwether Dixon Crittenden J. C. Breckinridge Davis Machen McCreery Williams Blackburn Deboe McCreary Bradley Camden Beckham Ernst Barkley Withers Clements Morton Cook Ford Bunning Paul

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Kentucky's delegation(s) to the 80th–82nd & 85th–90th United States Congresses (ordered by seniority)

80th Senate: A. W. Barkley J. S. Cooper House: V. Chapman B. Spence J. M. Robsion N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf E. Clements T. B. Morton W. H. Meade

80th Senate: A. W. Barkley J. S. Cooper House: V. Chapman B. Spence J. M. Robsion N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton W. H. Meade J. A. Whitaker

80th Senate: A. W. Barkley J. S. Cooper House: V. Chapman B. Spence N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton W. H. Meade J. A. Whitaker W. Lewis

81st Senate: A. W. Barkley V. Chapman House: B. Spence N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton J. A. Whitaker C. D. Perkins J. S. Golden T. R. Underwood

81st Senate: V. Chapman G. Withers House: B. Spence N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton J. A. Whitaker C. D. Perkins J. S. Golden T. R. Underwood

81st Senate: V. Chapman E. Clements House: B. Spence N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton J. A. Whitaker C. D. Perkins J. S. Golden T. R. Underwood

82nd Senate: V. Chapman E. Clements House: B. Spence N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton J. A. Whitaker C. D. Perkins J. S. Golden J. C. Watts

82nd Senate: E. Clements T. R. Underwood House: B. Spence N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton C. D. Perkins J. S. Golden J. C. Watts G. Withers

82nd Senate: E. Clements J. S. Cooper House: B. Spence N. J. Gregory J. B. Bates F. Chelf T. B. Morton C. D. Perkins J. S. Golden J. C. Watts G. Withers

85th Senate: J. S. Cooper T. B. Morton House: B. Spence N. J. Gregory F. Chelf C. D. Perkins J. C. Watts J. M. Robsion Jr. W. Natcher E. Siler

86th Senate: J. S. Cooper T. B. Morton House: B. Spence F. Chelf C. D. Perkins J. C. Watts W. Natcher E. Siler F. Stubblefield F. Burke

87th Senate: J. S. Cooper T. B. Morton House: B. Spence F. Chelf C. D. Perkins J. C. Watts W. Natcher E. Siler F. Stubblefield F. Burke

88th Senate: J. S. Cooper T. B. Morton House: F. Chelf C. D. Perkins J. C. Watts W. Natcher E. Siler F. Stubblefield G. Snyder

89th Senate: J. S. Cooper T. B. Morton House: F. Chelf C. D. Perkins J. C. Watts W. Natcher F. Stubblefield T. Carter C. R. Farnsley

90th Senate: J. S. Cooper T. B. Morton M. Cook House: C. D. Perkins J. C. Watts W. Natcher F. Stubblefield T. Carter G. Snyder W. Cowger

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 65533599 LCCN: n87870913 US Congress: M001022 SN

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