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MetroLink (reporting mark BSDA) is the light rail transit system in the Greater St. Louis
Greater St. Louis
area of Missouri
Missouri
and the Metro East
Metro East
area of Illinois. The system consists of two lines (Red Line and Blue Line) connecting Lambert-St. Louis International Airport and Shrewsbury, Missouri
Missouri
with Scott Air Force Base
Scott Air Force Base
near Shiloh, Illinois
Illinois
through downtown St. Louis. The system features 37 stations[1] and carries an average of 53,123 people each weekday.[2] As of the first quarter of 2015, it is second only to Minneapolis Metro Transit's Blue and Green lines in the Midwestern United States
Midwestern United States
in terms of ridership, and is the 11th-largest light rail system in the country.[4] MetroLink is operated by the Bi-State Development Agency, operating as Metro since 2003,[5] in a shared fare system with the MetroBus lines.[6]

Contents

1 History

1.1 Chronology

2 Rail lines

2.1 Red Line 2.2 Blue Line 2.3 Shared alignment

3 Rolling stock

3.1 Roster information

4 Fares 5 List of stations 6 Potential plans and extensions

6.1 Daniel Boone Corridor 6.2 MetroNorth Corridor 6.3 MetroSouth Corridor 6.4 North-South MetroLink Corridor

7 See also 8 Notes 9 References 10 External links

History[edit]

A view of the MetroLink system passing through Belleville, Illinois.

Construction on the initial MetroLink alignment from Lambert-St. Louis International Airport to the 5th & Missouri
Missouri
station in East St. Louis began in 1990. The initial 17-mile (27 km) segment with 19 stations opened on July 31, 1993 between the North Hanley and 5th & Missouri
Missouri
stations.[3] Service was operated with 31 high-floor light rail vehicles.[7] About 14 miles of the original 17 miles were on existing rail right-of-way. The first phase of MetroLink was complete when the line was extended westward to Lambert Airport Main station on June 25, 1994.[8][9] At that time another station, East Riverfront, was opened in East St. Louis.[10] Four years later, in 1998, the Lambert Airport East station was added.[11] The capital cost to build the initial phase of MetroLink was $465 million. Of that amount, $348 million was supplied by the Federal Transit Administration (FTA).[12] MetroLink exceeded pre-opening ridership estimates, but the system has expanded slowly. Construction on proposed extensions has been delayed by the increasing scarcity of FTA funds. As time has passed, an ever-greater share of the costs has been borne by state and local governments. The most recent work has been entirely funded by local dollars. Construction on the St. Clair County MetroLink extension from the 5th & Missouri
Missouri
station to the College station in Belleville began in 1998 and opened in May 2001. The extension added eight new stations and seven park-ride lots. The total project cost was $339.2 million, with the FTA and St. Clair County Transit District
St. Clair County Transit District
sharing the burden at 72% ($243.9 million) and 28% ($95.2 million), respectively. Local funding was provided by the St. Clair County Transit District
St. Clair County Transit District
as a result of a 1/2 cent sales tax passed in November 1993.[12] In May 2003, a 3.5-mile (5.6 km) extension from Southwestern Illinois
Illinois
College to Shiloh-Scott station opened. This $75 million project was funded by a $60 million grant from the Illinois
Illinois
FIRST (Fund for Infrastructure, Roads, Schools, and Transit) Program and $15 million from the St. Clair County Transit District.[12]

A westbound MetroLink train arrives at the Grand Station platform in midtown St. Louis
St. Louis
prior to 2011 reconstruction.

Average Daily Ridership, 2002 thru 2016

The Cross County Extension from Forest Park-DeBaliviere station to Shrewsbury-Lansdowne-I-44 station opened to the public on August 26, 2006 (2006-08-26). This 8-mile (13 km), 9-station extension connected Washington University, Clayton, the popular Saint Louis Galleria
Saint Louis Galleria
shopping center, and Shrewsbury to the system.[13] The entire project was funded by a $430 million Metro bond issue. Metro cited repeated delays and cost overruns as its reasons for firing its general contractor in Summer 2004. Metro sued the Collaborative for $81 million for fraud and mismanagement. The Collaborative counter-sued for $17 million for work that Metrolink hadn't yet paid for. On December 1, 2007, a jury voted in favor of the Cross County Collaborative, awarding them $2.56 million for work as yet unpaid for. On October 27, 2008 (2008-10-27), Metro renamed the two MetroLink lines using color designations: the Lambert Airport branch was renamed to the Red Line; the Shrewsbury branch, the Blue Line. Service was also extended on the Blue Line from its former terminus at Emerson Park to Fairview Heights. All trains have a red or blue sign on the front that identify the train as a Red Line or Blue Line train, and all operators make station announcements identifying the Red Line or Blue Line.[7][14] On September 9, 2014 (2014-09-09), the United States Department of Transportation announced $10.3 million in funding for a new Metrolink station between the Central West End and Grand stations in the CORTEX research district. The station, to be located just east of Boyle Avenue, is anticipated to open in 2018. Chronology[edit] Below is a chronological list of dates on which specific portions of the MetroLink system opened for service.

Date Event Stations Length

July 31, 1993 (1993-07-31)[15] Line opens between North Hanley and 5th & Missouri 16 13.9 miles (22 km)

May 14, 1994 (1994-05-14)[15] East Riverfront opens between existing stations 1 —

June 25, 1994 (1994-06-25)[15] Extension to Lambert Airport Main opens 1 3.15 miles (5.1 km)

December 23, 1998 (1998-12-23)[15] Lambert Airport East opens between existing stations 1 —

May 5, 2001 (2001-05-05)[15] Extension to College opens 8 17.4 miles (28 km)

June 23, 2003 (2003-06-23)[15] Extension to Shiloh-Scott opens 1 3.5 miles (6 km)

August 26, 2006 (2006-08-26)[16] Extension to Shrewsbury-Lansdowne I-44 opens 9 8 miles (13 km)

Total 37 46 miles (74 km)

Rail lines[edit]

MetroLink map showing Red Line and Blue Line alignments).

Red Line[edit] Main article: Red Line ( St. Louis
St. Louis
MetroLink) The main Metrolink alignment begins at Lambert St. Louis
St. Louis
International Airport, making stops at the main and east terminals. It then proceeds through Berkeley before making a stop at North Hanley north of Bel-Ridge. It then makes two stops (UMSL North & South stations) at the University of Missouri
Missouri
St. Louis
St. Louis
campus located in Normandy. After leaving the University of Missouri
Missouri
St. Louis, the line continues along the old Wabash Railroad
Wabash Railroad
right-of-way until Grand Avenue.[9][15] Along this right-of-way stops are made in Pagedale at St. Charles Rock Road and in Wellston, before crossing the county line at Skinker Boulevard; and making a stop at Delmar, serving the popular Delmar Loop area that straddles the St. Louis/University City border. It meets up with the Blue Line at the Forest Park-DeBaliviere station. From this station on until the Fairview Heights station, it shares tracks with the Blue Line. The line is a total of 38 miles with 28 stations. For the rest of the Red Line, see "Shared alignment". Blue Line[edit]

University City-Big Bend Station along the Blue Line, near Washington University.

Main article: Blue Line ( St. Louis
St. Louis
MetroLink) The Blue Line starts in Shrewsbury just to the west of River des Peres. It crosses Interstate 44
Interstate 44
and then continues northeast till the next 2 stations located in Maplewood, one at the Sunnen Industrial Complex, the other at Manchester Road. From there, it continues north to the Brentwood I-64 station located in Brentwood just south of Interstate 64. It then proceeds underneath Interstate 64, continuing to the Richmond Heights station in Richmond Heights. This station serves the popular St. Louis
St. Louis
Galleria shopping center. Following that it proceeds to Clayton station in Clayton, serving the Central Business District of St. Louis
St. Louis
County. From here, it continues in a tunnel right under Forest Park Parkway, making stops at Forsyth Boulevard and Big Bend Boulevard in University City, serving Washington University. It then makes a stop at Skinker Boulevard in St. Louis
St. Louis
City, before meeting the Red Line at Forest Park DeBaliviere station. It is 24 miles long, with 24 stations. For the rest of the Blue Line, see "Shared alignment". Shared alignment[edit]

The 1874-built Eads Bridge
Eads Bridge
carries both MetroLink tracks across the Mississippi River
Mississippi River
between Missouri
Missouri
and Illinois
Illinois
on its lower rail deck, under the road.

Both MetroLink lines meet at the Forest Park-DeBaliviere station and continue for 14 more stations east on shared tracks until the Blue Line terminates at Fairview Heights.[17] From the Forest Park station, the trains continue to the Central West End station, serving the Barnes-Jewish Hospital
Barnes-Jewish Hospital
complex and the popular Euclid Avenue shopping district. From there, it proceeds to the Grand station under the Grand Boulevard viaduct, which services the St. Louis
St. Louis
University complex and hospital. The trains pass under the Jefferson Avenue viaduct before they enter the next station near Union Station, located underneath 18th Street just near the popular Union Station shopping mall. A short distance later, the trains stop at the Civic Center Station, with transfer to the Gateway Transportation Center and the Scottrade Center. The trains then continue to run parallel under the 14th Street and Tucker Boulevard viaducts to the elevated section of Interstate 64
Interstate 64
until the Busch Stadium station, originally serving the old, and now the new Busch Stadium. From then on, the line goes underground through a previously abandoned tunnel that had not been in use since 1974,[15] with stations at 8th & Pine streets, and the Convention Center under Washington Avenue and 6th Street, serving the Edward Jones Dome
Edward Jones Dome
and Convention Center. It then makes stops on both sides of the Eads Bridge at Arch– Laclede's Landing
Laclede's Landing
station and at the East Riverfront station in East St. Louis, which serves the Casino Queen Gambling Casino & Hotel. From there, it runs at-grade from the 5th & Missouri
Missouri
station till the Fairview Heights station in Fairview Heights, Illinois. Here, the Blue line trains terminate, and the Red line trains continue until the line terminus at Shiloh-Scott AFB station at the gate to the base in Shiloh, Illinois. Rolling stock[edit]

Interior of a MetroLink light-rail vehicle.

MetroLink operates a fleet of 87 light-rail vehicles composed of 31 SD-400 and 56 SD-460 vehicles. Each 90-foot (27 m), single articulated vehicle has 4 high platform doors per side and has a capacity of 72 seated and 106 standing passengers.[18][19] The cars are powered by an electric motor which gets its electricity from a catenary wire with a 750 volt supply.[20] Each car has an enclosed operator cab at each end. This allows the most flexible system for managing operations, but prevents travel between cars except at stations. Each car also has separate doors for station level and track level access. In normal operations the track level doors (equipped with stairs) are unused. The system also has two different railroad yards along the line for the storage and maintenance of light-rail vehicles: Ewing Yard is located between the Grand and Union Station stops just west of downtown St. Louis; 29th Street Yard is located between the JJK and Washington Park stops in Illinois. In October 2009, Metro had opened a paint booth facility in the Illinois
Illinois
railyard in East St. Louis, Illinois
Illinois
at a cost of $1.1 million.[21]

Brand-new Siemens SD-400
Siemens SD-400
unit on the then-newly opened MetroLink system in 1993.

Roster information[edit]

Unit Type Year Built Quantity Numbers[22]

Siemens SD400 LRV 1991–1993 31 1001–1031

Siemens SD460 LRV 1999 10 2001–2010

Siemens SD460 LRV 2000 24 3001–3024

Siemens SD460 LRV 2004–2005 22 4001-4022

Fares[edit]

Civic Center MetroLink Station

MetroLink uses a proof-of-payment system. Tickets can be purchased at ticket vending machines at the entrance to all stations and must be validated before boarding the train. The tickets are only good for two hours in the direction that a passenger boards.[7] Effective July 1, 2014 (2014-07-01), the fares are as follows:

1 Ride Ticket-$2.50 (reduced fare-$1.25) (rail only) 2 Hour Pass-$3 (reduced fare-$1.50) (unlimited use on Metrobus and Rail for 2 hours only) 2 Hour Pass from Lambert Airport $4 (unlimited use on MetroBus and Rail) One-Day Pass-$7.50 (unlimited use on MetroBus and Rail) Weekly Pass-$27 (unlimited use on MetroBus and Rail) Monthly Pass-$78 (reduced fare-$39) (unlimited use on MetroBus and Rail)

Reduced fares can be purchased by seniors ages 65+, people with disabilities, and children ages 5–12. Children under 5 ride free with fare-paying rider; 3-kid limit applies. Proof of age may be requested of all people riding with reduced fares. Other types of passes, such as a Semester Pass for full-time students are also available in addition to the fares listed above.[23] List of stations[edit] Main article: List of St. Louis
St. Louis
MetroLink stations Potential plans and extensions[edit] Daniel Boone Corridor[edit]

Daniel Boone Corridor
Daniel Boone Corridor
– Clayton to Westport A study performed in 2000 recommended a new MetroLink line from Clayton, Missouri
Missouri
to Westport Plaza in Maryland Heights, Missouri. The 8–10-mile (13–16 km) line would run north from the Clayton station along the old Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis "Central Belt" right-of-way paralleling I-170, then turn west to follow existing Union Pacific Railroad
Union Pacific Railroad
trackage operated by Central Midland Railway to Page where the line would then follow Page Avenue to Westport Plaza.[24][25] This future alignment will add up to six stations between Clayton and Maryland Heights in the I-170-Page Corridor. Metro officials have suggested that this line could be the next MetroLink extension to be built.[26][27]

MetroNorth Corridor[edit]

MetroNorth Corridor
MetroNorth Corridor
– Clayton to Florissant This 12-mile (19 km) extension project would extend the current Blue Line from Clayton to North County into Florissant. Like the Daniel Boone line, some of it will follow along the old Terminal Railroad Association of St. Louis
St. Louis
"Central Belt" right-of-way paralleling I-170.

MetroSouth Corridor[edit]

MetroSouth Corridor
MetroSouth Corridor
– Shrewsbury to Butler Hill This 12-mile (19 km) extension project would extend the current Blue Line from its terminus in Shrewsbury further into South County beyond I-270/I-255 to Butler Hill Road. An environmental impact study was completed in 2004; however, selection of a locally preferred alternative was deferred due to the lack of local funding sources as well as many other factors.[28]

North-South MetroLink Corridor[edit]

NorthSide Corridor- Downtown to Goodfellow & I-70 to St. Louis Community College-Florissant Valley [29]

The 12-mile (19 km) extension starts north from Downtown St Louis further northwest to the Florissant Valley Community College. A study for this extension was completed in 2008 and a Locally Preferred Alternative selected.

SouthSide Corridor
SouthSide Corridor
– Downtown to Bayless to Butler Hill [30] The 9-or-17-mile (14 or 27 km) extension starts from Downtown to the south of St. Louis
St. Louis
County to Bayless I-55. A study for this extension was completed in 2008 and a Locally Preferred Alternative selected. The Locally Preferred Alternative begins at the Multi-Modal Transit Center at 14th & Spruce Sts., continues south on 14th St. to Chouteau Ave., travelling west on Chouteau to Jefferson Ave., then travelling south on Jefferson to Meramec St., where it then follows a right-of-way on Interstate Highway 55 to a terminus at Bayless Ave.

See also[edit]

Delmar Loop
Delmar Loop
Trolley List of tram and light rail transit systems List of rail transit systems in the United States

Notes[edit]

^ a b c "Procurement Information". Bi-State Development Agency (Metro). 2010. Archived from the original on 2013-08-18. Retrieved 2013-08-11.  ^ a b "Comprehensive Annual Financial Report (FY 2013/FY2012)" (PDF). Bi-State Development Agency. November 22, 2013. p. 149. Archived from the original (PDF) on December 21, 2014. Retrieved June 9, 2014.  ^ a b "History – The 1990s – MetroLink". Bi-State Development Agency (Metro). 2010. Archived from the original on 2013-08-23. Retrieved 2013-08-11.  ^ APTA Q1 2015 Light Rail Transit Ridership Report ^ " Bi-State Development Agency
Bi-State Development Agency
Adopts "Metro" As New Name" (PDF) (Press release). Metro. 2003-01-24. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2006-09-24. Retrieved 2008-08-08.  ^ "Fare Increase 2014". www.metrostlouis.org. Archived from the original on 2016-04-16. Retrieved 2016-04-10.  ^ a b c "world.nycsubway.org: St. Louis, Missouri". www.nycsubway.org. Retrieved 2016-04-10.  ^ Tipton, Virgil (1994-06-22). "Takeoff: MetroLink Opens Lambert Stop Saturday". St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch.  ^ a b Fox, Tim (1995-01-01). Where We Live: A Guide to St. Louis Communities. Missouri
Missouri
History Museum. ISBN 9781883982126.  ^ Goodrich, Robert (1994-04-27). "East St. Louis
St. Louis
Starring in MetroLink". St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch.  ^ "2nd MetroLink station opens at Lambert". St. Louis
St. Louis
Business Journal. 1998-12-23. Retrieved 2008-08-07.  ^ a b c "Metro – Inside MetroLink". Metro. Archived from the original on 2008-09-11. Retrieved 2007-10-23.  ^ "Metro Announces August 26 Grand Opening Date for Cross County MetroLink Extension" (PDF) (Press release). Metro. 7 August 2006. Archived from the original (PDF) on 9 October 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-07.  ^ "Service Changes Effective October 27, 2008" (PDF) (Press release). Metro. Retrieved 2008-10-24. [permanent dead link] ^ a b c d e f g h "UrbanRail.Net > North America > USA > Missouri
Missouri
> St. Louis
St. Louis
Metrolink". www.urbanrail.net. Retrieved 2016-04-10.  ^ " St. Louis
St. Louis
Metro to Launch MetroLink Extension August 26". www.apta.com. Retrieved 2016-04-10.  ^ "MetroLink Schematic Map Saint Louis" (PDF). metrostlouis.org. Metro. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 28, 2016. Retrieved April 10, 2016.  ^ " Siemens AG
Siemens AG
– Projects – Rolling Stock". Siemens AG. Archived from the original on 2007-02-07. Retrieved 2007-01-23.  ^ "SD460 High-Floor Light Rail Vehicle – St. Louis, Missouri" (PDF). Siemens AG. Retrieved 2015-02-10.  ^ "The St. Louis
St. Louis
Streetcar and MetroLink: Compatibility Issues to Address Before Expansion – nextSTL". nextSTL. Retrieved 2016-04-10.  ^ "Capital Projects Update: Illinois
Illinois
Paint Booth NextStop STL Saint Louis, Missouri". www.nextstopstl.org. Retrieved 2016-04-10.  ^ Modern Urban Rail Systems Archived 2012-07-11 at Archive.is
Archive.is
Bi-State Transit Info & Roster ^ "Fare Chart". Metro. Retrieved 1 June 2014.  ^ "MetroLink Planning – Daniel Boone". East-West Gateway. Archived from the original on March 20, 2007. Retrieved 2007-06-01.  ^ http://railsandtrails.com/Maps/StLouis/index.htm ^ Hilligand, Terry; Bryant, Tim (2008-07-29). "Commuters in St. Charles, Madison counties still waiting for the train". St. Louis Post-Dispatch. Archived from the original on 2009-03-25. Retrieved 2008-10-30.  ^ Leiser, Ken (2008-10-30). " St. Louis
St. Louis
County MetroLink expansion: West Port Ho!". St. Louis
St. Louis
Post-Dispatch. Archived from the original on 2009-03-25. Retrieved 2008-10-30.  ^ "East-West Gateway Board Defers Selection of MetroLink Alternative for Metro South Study Area" (PDF). East-West Gateway. 3 November 2004. Archived from the original (PDF) on 15 May 2013. Retrieved 29 September 2010.  ^ "MetroLink Planning – Northside". East-West Gateway. Archived from the original on August 3, 2008. Retrieved 2008-10-30.  ^ "MetroLink Planning – Southside". East-West Gateway. Archived from the original on March 26, 2009. Retrieved 2008-10-30. 

References[edit]

Tuzik, Robert (August 1990). "What's different about St. Louis
St. Louis
light rail – its low cost per track mile". Railway Age. Retrieved 2007-05-18.  "MetroLink: the long ride from concept to reality". West End Word. 2006-08-30. Archived from the original on 2007-05-09. Retrieved 2007-06-07.  Garrison, Chad (2008-08-20). "Out-of-control shoplifting at the St. Louis Galleria. Violent attacks in the Delmar Loop. Is MetroLink a vehicle for crime?". The Riverfront Times. Retrieved 2010-02-25. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to St. Louis
St. Louis
MetroLink.

Route map: Google

KML file (edit • help)

Display on Google Maps

Template:Attached KML/MetroLink (St. Louis) KML is not from Wikidata

External images

Rapid Transit Systems – St. Louis
St. Louis
Photographs of the MetroLink system.

Railroad Picture Archives: MetroLink – MetroLink photographs at Railroad Picture Archives.

Skips Railroad Depot MetroLink Photo Page

Official website Official blog website East West Gateway – St. Louis
St. Louis
MPO: MetroLink planning page Cross County Extension – Official project website Metro South Study – Official study website Citizens for Modern Transit – St. Louis
St. Louis
transit advocacy group Moving Transit Forward St. Louis
St. Louis
Transit Alliance Website MetroLink Expansion
MetroLink Expansion
Options

v t e

Public transportation in Greater St. Louis

Public transit agencies

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Local and express bus service

Missouri: MetroBus Illinois: Madison County

Bus rapid transit

St. Louis
St. Louis
Bus Rapid Transit

Light rail

MetroLink:

Red Line Blue Line List of stations

Streetcar

St. Louis
St. Louis
streetcar system Delmar Loop
Delmar Loop
Trolley St. Charles City

Paratransit

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St. Louis
St. Louis
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Missouri
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St. Louis
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Transportation in Greater St. Louis East-West Gateway Council of Governments Gateway Arch

Italics denote lines or service which are planned or not operating

v t e

MetroLink (St. Louis)

Lines

     Red Line      Blue Line

Infrastructure

Eads Bridge List of MetroLink stations

Rolling Stock

Siemens SD-400 Siemens SD-460

Rail yards

Ewing Yard 29th Street Yard

Connections

Forest Park–DeBaliviere Gateway Multimodal Transportation Center Lambert– St. Louis
St. Louis
International Airport

Connecting services

MetroBus Madison County Transit St. Charles Area Transit Metro Call-A-Ride Loop Trolley

Proposed expansions

Daniel Boone Corridor MetroNorth Corridor MetroSouth Corridor NorthWest Connector NorthSide Corridor SouthSide Corridor St. Charles Corridor SouthWest Corridor MidAmerica Extension Phase 3 Madison County Corridors

Operators

Metro Transit (Bi-State Development Agency) St. Clair County Transit District

Italic denote lines or services which are proposed and planned.

v t e

Developments in St. Louis

Buildings Projects

St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals Hall of Fame Museum The Bottle District

Expansion Projects

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Transportation Projects

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St. Louis
Streetcar

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Common carriers

ALS BJRY BLOL BNSF BOCT BRC CAEG CC CCUO CFE CIR CIRY CN COER CP CPC CRL CSS CSXT CTM DME DT DCC EFRR EIRC EVWR GTW GWWE IAIS IC IHB ILW IMRR INRD IR JE KBSR KCS KJRY LSLS MJ MRS NS PPU PRY RVPR SCIH SIM SOO STR TPW TRRA TZPR UP VRRC VVRR WC WSOR

Passenger carriers

AMTK BST CTA FRTX IRYM METX MRMZ NICD SCSX

Private carriers

BTCZ CCFF CHTT CMAZ CRC CWI DOTX FNG JJRX KKRX NAIR MIRR PCCX PPHW RRC

Former carriers

A ATSF BN BO C&A CBQ CEI CGW CIW CMNW CNW CO CR CRI CTML EJE ERIE EL GMO GWWR ICE ICG IHRC LM LSBC IMRL IN ITC LN MC MI MILW MON MP MSTL NKP NP NW NYC PACY PAE PARY PC PI PLM PM PRR PTC RI SBD SOU SP SSW WAB WICT WVRC ZCCX

See also: List of United States railroads by political division

v t e

Railroads of Missouri

Common carriers

AM BNSF BSDA CMR CP CSXT CT DME KCS KCT KCTL KAW MNA MNC MOC MRS MVP NS OVRR SE SIM SKOL TRRA UP

Passenger carriers

AMTK BSRX BST MOTX SLIM

Private carriers

HTSX JGDX JSRC MRIX RRC SHRX

Former carriers

A ATSF BN BO BVS CBQ CBRM CEI CGW CNW CO CR GMO GWWR HC IC ICG LN MI MILW MKT MP MS NKP NYC PC PRR RI RSM SBD SLSF SOO SOU SSW WAB WGRY

See also: List of United States railroads by political division

v t e

Currently operating light rail and streetcar systems in the United States

Arizona

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Lowell National Historical Park
Lowell National Historical Park
Trolley

Michigan

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Missouri

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Missouri/Illinois

St. Louis
St. Louis
MetroLink

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New York

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Seattle

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Italics denote non-transit streetcar lines, operating only on limited dates and usually not year-round, for tourism or edu

.