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The Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
team now known as the Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles originated in Milwaukee
Milwaukee
as the Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers, and then moved to St. Louis, Missouri, where they played for more than 50 years as the St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns. This article covers the franchise's history in St. Louis, which began when the team moved from Milwaukee
Milwaukee
after the 1901 season and ended with the team's move to Baltimore
Baltimore
after the 1953 season. As of November 14, 2017, there are only 12 living former St. Louis Browns players.

Contents

1 Before 1902 2 1902–1921 3 1922–1943 4 War era 5 Veeck era 6 Legacy 7 In popular culture 8 References 9 External links

Before 1902[edit] In the late 19th century, the team existed as the Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers in the Western League.[1] For the 1900 season, the Western League was renamed to "American League", and in 1901, it was converted to a major league under the leadership of Ban Johnson. Johnson had originally intended to move the Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers to St. Louis. When he couldn't find a suitable owner, he was forced to operate the team in Milwaukee
Milwaukee
for a lame-duck season in 1901. In 1902, however, he found a suitable St. Louis-based owner in carriage maker Robert Lee Hedges, who moved the team to St. Louis
St. Louis
and changed their name to the "Browns", in reference to the original name of the 1880s club that by 1900 was known as the Cardinals. Hedges built a new park on the site of the old Browns' former home, Sportsman's Park. 1902–1921[edit]

Barney Pelty

In their first St. Louis
St. Louis
season, the Browns finished second. Although the Browns had only four winning seasons from 1902 to 1922, they were very popular at the gate during their first two decades in St. Louis, and trounced the Cardinals in attendance. Pitcher Barney Pelty
Barney Pelty
was a workhorse for the Browns, a member of their starting rotation from 1904, when he pitched 31 complete games and 301 innings, through 1911.[2][3] In 1909, the Browns rebuilt Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
as the third concrete-and-steel park in the majors. During this time, the Browns were best known for their role in the race for the 1910 American League
American League
batting title. Ty Cobb
Ty Cobb
took the last game of the season off, believing that his slight lead over Nap Lajoie, of the Cleveland Naps, would hold up unless Lajoie had a near-perfect day at the plate. Browns' manager Jack O'Connor had ordered rookie third baseman Red Corriden to play on the outfield grass. This all but conceded a hit for any ball Lajoie bunted. Lajoie bunted five straight times down the third base line and made it to first easily. On his last at-bat, Lajoie reached base on an error – officially giving him a hitless at-bat. O'Connor and coach Harry Howell tried to bribe the official scorer, a woman, to change the call to a hit – even offering to buy her a new wardrobe. Cobb won the batting title by just a few thousandths of a point over Lajoie (though it later emerged that one game may have been counted twice in the statistics). After news broke of the scandal, a writer for the St. Louis
St. Louis
Post claimed: "All St. Louis
St. Louis
is up in arms over the deplorable spectacle, conceived in stupidity and executed in jealousy." The resulting outcry triggered an investigation by American League president Ban Johnson. At his insistence, Hedges[2] fired O'Connor and Howell; both men were informally banned from baseball for life. In 1916, Hedges sold the Browns to Philip DeCatesby Ball, who owned the St. Louis
St. Louis
Terriers in the by-then-defunct Federal League. Ball's early tenure saw the club's first real sustained period of success on the field; they were a contender for most of the early 1920s. This was fueled by Ball's free spending to put a winner of the field; he reinvested all profits into the team. However, Ball made a series of blunders that would ultimately doom the franchise. Shortly after buying the team, he fired general manager Branch Rickey, who was promptly hired by the Cardinals. Four years later, Ball allowed the Cardinals to move out of dilapidated Robison Field and share Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
with the Browns. Rickey and Cardinals owner Sam Breadon
Sam Breadon
used the proceeds from the Robison Field sale to build baseball's first modern farm system. This effort eventually produced several star players that brought the Cardinals more drawing power than the Browns. 1922–1943[edit]

George Sisler

The 1922 Browns excited their owner by almost beating the Yankees
Yankees
to a pennant. The club was boasting the best players in franchise history, including future Hall of Famer George Sisler
George Sisler
and an outfield trio of Ken Williams, Baby Doll Jacobson, and Jack Tobin
Jack Tobin
that batted .300 or better from 1919–23 and in 1925. In 1922, Williams became the first player in Major League history to hit 30 home runs and steal 30 bases in a season, something that would not be done again in the Majors until 1956. Ball confidently predicted that there would be a World Series in Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
by 1926. In anticipation, he increased the capacity of his ballpark from 18,000 to 30,000. There was a World Series in Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
in 1926 – but it was the Cardinals who took part, upsetting the Yankees. St. Louis
St. Louis
had been considered a "Browns town" until then; after their 1926 series victory, however, the Cardinals dominated St. Louis
St. Louis
baseball while still technically tenants of the Browns. Meanwhile, the Browns rapidly fell into the cellar. They only had two winning records from 1927 to 1943, including a 43-111 mark in 1939 that is still the worst in franchise history. Ball died in 1933. His estate ran the team for three years until Rickey helped broker a sale to investment banker Donald Lee Barnes, whose son-in-law, Bill DeWitt, was the team's general manager. To help finance the purchase, Barnes sold 20,000 shares of stock to the public at $5 a share, an unusual practice for a sports franchise. War era[edit] By 1941, Barnes was convinced he could never make money in St. Louis. After interests in Los Angeles approached him about buying a stake in the team, he asked AL owners for permission to move there for the 1942 season. Los Angeles was already the third-largest city in the United States, and was larger than any major-league city except New York and Chicago. They got tentative approval from the league, which went as far as to draw up a schedule accounting for transcontinental train trips, though the Browns suggested that teams could travel by plane, a new concept at the time. The deal was slated to receive final approval at a league meeting on December 8. In a case of disastrous timing, the attack on Pearl Harbor took place on December 7. After league officials expressed concerns that travel restrictions would be too stringent for a prospective Los Angeles-based team to be viable, the Browns' proposal was unanimously rejected.[4][5] During World War II, the Browns won their only American League
American League
pennant in St. Louis, in 1944. Some critics called it a fluke, as most major league stars voluntarily joined or were drafted into the military; however, many of the Browns' best players were classified 4-F: unfit for military service. They faced their local rivals, the incredibly successful Cardinals, in the 1944 World Series, the last World Series to date played entirely in one stadium. However, the Browns lost the series in six games. After the Series, Barnes sold the Browns to businessman Richard Muckerman. In 1945, the Browns posted an 81–75 record and fell to third place, six games out, again with less than top-ranked talent. The 1945 season may be best remembered for the Browns' signing of utility outfielder Pete Gray, the only one-armed major league position player in history. The 1945 season proved to be the Browns' last hurrah; they would never have another winning season in St. Louis. In fact, 1944 and 1945 were two of only eight winning seasons they enjoyed in the 31 years after nearly winning the pennant in 1922. Part of the problem was that Muckerman cared more about improving Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
than improving the on-field product. He sold the team to DeWitt in 1949, but DeWitt was unable to reverse the slide. At one point, DeWitt was forced to sell any good prospects to the Red Sox or Tigers in order to pay the bills. Veeck era[edit]

Eddie Gaedel
Eddie Gaedel
at bat.

In 1951, Bill Veeck, the colorful former owner of the Cleveland Indians, purchased the Browns from DeWitt. In St. Louis, he extended the promotions and wild antics that had made him famous and loved by many and loathed by many others. His most notorious stunt in St. Louis came on August 19, 1951, when he ordered Browns manager, Zack Taylor to send Eddie Gaedel, a 3-foot 7-inch, 65-pound midget, to bat as a pinch hitter. When Gaedel stepped to the plate he was wearing a Browns child's uniform with the number ​1⁄8. With no strike zone to speak of, Gaedel walked on four straight pitches, as he was ordered not to swing at any pitch. The stunt infuriated American League
American League
President Will Harridge, who voided Gaedel's contract the next day. Veeck also promoted another publicity stunt in which the Browns handed out placards – reading take, swing, bunt, etc. – to fans and allowed them to make managerial decisions for a day. Manager Zack Taylor dutifully surveyed the fans' advice and relayed the sign accordingly.[6] The Browns won the game against the Philadelphia Athletics, whose venerable owner Connie Mack
Connie Mack
took part in the "Grandstand Managers" voting (against his own team). After the 1951 season, Veeck made Ned Garver
Ned Garver
the highest-paid member of the Browns. Garver went on to win 20 games, while the team lost 100 games. He was the second pitcher in history to accomplish the feat. Veeck also brought Satchel Paige
Satchel Paige
back to major league baseball to pitch for the Browns. Veeck had previously signed the former Negro League great to a contract in Cleveland in 1948 at age 42, amid much criticism. At 45, Paige's re-appearance in a Browns uniform did nothing to win Veeck friends among baseball's owners. Nonetheless, Paige ended the season with a respectable 3–4 record and a 4.79 ERA. Veeck believed that St. Louis
St. Louis
was too small for two franchises and planned to drive the Cardinals out of town. He signed many of the Cardinals' most popular ex-players and, as a result, attracted many Cards fans to see the Browns. Notably, Veeck inked former Cardinals great Dizzy Dean
Dizzy Dean
to a broadcasting contract and tapped Rogers Hornsby as manager. He also re-acquired former Browns fan favorite Vern Stephens and signed former Cardinals pitcher Harry Brecheen, both of whom had starred in the all- St. Louis
St. Louis
World Series in 1944. Veeck also stripped Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
of all Cardinals material and dressed it exclusively in Browns memorabilia, even moving his family to an apartment under the stands. The Browns never came close to fielding a winning team during this time; in Veeck's three years as owner, they never finished any closer than 31 games out of first, and even lost 100 games twice. Nonetheless, Veeck's showmanship and colorful promotions made attendance at Browns games more fun and unpredictable than the conservative Cardinals were willing to offer. Veeck's all-out assault on the Cardinals came during a downturn in the Cardinals' fortunes after Rickey left them for the Brooklyn Dodgers
Brooklyn Dodgers
in 1942. Veeck appeared to have won the battle when Cardinals' owner Fred Saigh was convicted of massive tax evasion late in 1952 and forced to sell his team. For a time, it looked almost certain that the Cardinals were leaving town, as most of the credible bids came from non-St. Louis interests, particularly Houston, Texas, where the Cardinals operated a Class AAA farm team. However, just when it looked like the Cardinals were about to move to Texas, Saigh accepted a bid from St. Louis-based brewery Anheuser-Busch. Brewery president Gussie Busch jumped into the bidding specifically to keep the Cardinals in St. Louis. Veeck quickly realized that he was finished in St. Louis. He knew that with Anheuser-Busch's corporate wealth behind them, the Cardinals now had more resources than he could ever hope to match. Unlike his fellow owners, he had no income apart from the Browns. Reluctantly, he ceded St. Louis
St. Louis
to the Cardinals and decided to move the Browns. As a first step, he sold Sportsman's Park to the Cardinals. He probably would have had to sell the park in any event. The 44-year-old park had fallen into disrepair, and Veeck could not afford to bring it up to code even with the rent from the Cardinals. Veeck attempted to move the Browns back to Milwaukee
Milwaukee
(where he had owned the Brewers of the American Association in the 1940s), but the move was blocked by the other American League
American League
owners, as well as Boston Braves owner Lou Perini, who ended up abruptly moving his National League
National League
franchise there in March 1953, only three weeks before opening day. Undaunted, Veeck got in touch with Baltimore
Baltimore
Mayor Tommy D'Alesandro and attorney Clarence Miles, who were leading an effort to bring the major leagues back to Baltimore
Baltimore
after a half-century hiatus. However, he was rebuffed by the owners, still seething over the publicity stunts he pulled at the Browns home games (as well as proposals Veeck had made to pool revenues from broadcasting, a concept particularly abhorrent to the Yankees, whose broadcast income dwarfed most other franchises). Although there was never official word that the 1953 season would be the Browns' last in St. Louis, there were enough unofficial signs that attendance dwindled to only 3,860 fans per game. Under the circumstances, the Browns made a wretched showing, finishing 54-100, 46 games out of first. This was partly because late in the season, the Browns were running so low on baseballs that they were forced to ration them during batting practice. When what would be the Browns' last game in St. Louis—a 2-1 loss to the White Sox—went into extra innings, the Browns had so few baseballs on hand that the umpires were forced to recycle the least damaged ones that had previously been used. Reportedly, the last ball used was gashed from seam to seam.[7] After the season, Veeck cut a deal with Miles which would see the Browns move to Baltimore. Under the plan, Veeck would have remained as principal owner, but he would have sold half of his 80% stake to a group of Baltimore
Baltimore
investors headed by Miles. Despite assurances from American League
American League
president Will Harridge that approval would be a formality, only four owners voted aye – two short of passage. Reportedly, this was due to Yankees
Yankees
co-owner Del Webb
Del Webb
drumming up support for a surprise move of the Browns to Los Angeles (where Webb held extensive construction interests). Although the Los Angeles proposal may have been only a bluff -- it was felt travel and schedule considerations would make a move of only one franchise, rather than two, to the West Coast insurmountable -- Veeck, Miles and D'Alesandro realized that the other AL owners were simply looking for a way to push Veeck out. Over the next 48 hours, Miles lined up enough support from his group of investors to buy out Veeck's entire stake for $2.5 million. Veeck had little choice but to agree. He was facing threats of having his franchise revoked, and he'd given up his only leverage by selling Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
to the Cardinals. The other owners duly approved the sale. While Baltimore
Baltimore
brewer Jerold Hoffberger became the largest shareholder, it was Miles who was named president and chairman of the board. His first act was to request permission to move the team to Baltimore, which was swiftly approved. Legacy[edit] See also: Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles Unlike other clubs that relocated in the 1950s, retaining their nickname and a sense of continuity with their past (such as the Brooklyn/Los Angeles Dodgers, New York/San Francisco Giants, Boston/Milwaukee/Atlanta Braves, and Philadelphia/Kansas City/Oakland Athletics), the St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns were renamed the Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles upon their transfer, implicitly distancing themselves at least somewhat from their history. It was also unique for team moves in the 1950s in that the Browns/Orioles moved eastward instead of westward geographically. In December 1954, the Orioles further distanced themselves from their Browns past when General Manager, Paul Richards made a 17-player trade with the New York Yankees
Yankees
that included most former Browns of note still on the Baltimore
Baltimore
roster.[8] It remains the biggest trade in baseball history.[8] Though the deal did little to improve the short-term competitiveness of the club, it helped establish a fresh identity for the Orioles franchise. To this day, the Orioles make almost no mention of their past as the Browns. The Orioles finally cut the last ties to the Browns era in August 1979, when new owner Edward Bennett Williams
Edward Bennett Williams
bought back the shares Barnes had sold to the public in 1936, making the franchise privately held once again. Although the buyout price is not known, it is assumed that given the Orioles' prosperity over their then 25 years in Baltimore, the owners made a handsome return on their investment. The Browns, along with the Washington Senators, were mostly associated with losing, as both franchises seemed to be the American League's perennial doormats. The Senators became the butt of a well-known vaudeville joke, "First in war, first in peace, and last in the American League" (a twist on the famous "Light Horse Harry" Lee eulogy for George Washington: "First in war, first in peace and first in the hearts of his countrymen"). A spin-off joke was coined for the Browns: "First in shoes, first in booze, and last in the American League." (On October 2, 1944, cartoonist Amadee drew the St. Louis
St. Louis
Weatherbird
Weatherbird
in a Browns uniform, standing on its head, with the legend "And first in the American League!") [9] Many older fans in St. Louis
St. Louis
remember the Browns fondly, and some have formed societies to keep the memory of the team alive; it is not uncommon to see sporting goods stores in the St. Louis
St. Louis
area stock Browns shirts and hats.[citation needed] The former in-town rival Cardinals honor George Sisler
George Sisler
with a statue outside Busch Stadium, and generally take up the responsibility for honoring the Browns. Believed to be the oldest former major leaguer at the time, and the last living pitcher to have faced Babe Ruth, the Browns' Rollie Stiles, 100, died July 22, 2007, in St. Louis
St. Louis
County.[10] Coincidentally, another team named the Browns would relocate to Baltimore
Baltimore
and abandon its previous identity four decades later: in 1996, professional football's Cleveland Browns
Cleveland Browns
relocated to Baltimore, taking on the identity of the Baltimore
Baltimore
Ravens. In popular culture[edit] In the 1944 movie Going My Way, Bing Crosby wears a sweatshirt with " St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns" across it, and takes the "boys" to see them play. Several months after the film was released, the Browns won the American League
American League
pennant, but lost the World Series to the St. Louis Cardinals.[11] Skip Battin
Skip Battin
and Kim Fowley
Kim Fowley
wrote a country rock song called "The St. Louis Browns". The song tells the story of the team and its move to Baltimore. It appears on Battin's 1972 solo album Skip, and as the B-side of his single "Central Park". It was also included in the compilation album Baseball's Greatest Hits: Let's Play II.[12][13][14] References[edit]

^ " Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers (minors)". BR Bullpen. Baseball Reference. Retrieved October 23, 2014.  ^ a b "The Baseball Biography Project". bioproj.sabr.org. Archived from the original on 2007-04-21.  ^ Baseball in Saint Louis 1900-1925 - Steve Steinberg ^ Modesti, Kevin (2001-12-07). "History of a different hue: before Pearl Harbor, St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns were L. A. bound". Los Angeles Daily News.  ^ Christine, Bill (1987-06-20). "Outbreak of World War II Kept the Browns from Moving to L. A." Los Angeles Times.  ^ Mike Shatzkin; Stephen Holtje; James Charlton (1990). The Ballplayers. New York: Arbor House/William Morrow. ISBN 0-87795-984-6.  ^ Neyer, Rob (2008). Rob Neyer's Big Book of Baseball Legends. New York City: Fireside. ISBN 1-4165-6491-8.  ^ a b Hecht, Henry (August 25, 1986). "A Fond Farewell To A Baseball Man Who Wasn't Afraid To Take Chances". Sports Illustrated. Retrieved January 24, 2016.  ^ Dick Kaegel. "Renowned St. Louis
St. Louis
cartoonist Amadee dies at 102". MLB.com. Retrieved September 4, 2016.  ^ "Rolle Stiles - Former Brown dies at 100". historicbaseball.com. Retrieved 2011-04-09.  ^ Christine, Bill (October 11, 1989). "The No-Place-but-Home Series: In 1944, Baseball's Spirit Stayed in St. Louis
St. Louis
with Cardinals and Browns". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved October 6, 2017.  ^ "Skip Battin: Skip". Rising Storm. November 23, 2009. Retrieved October 6, 2017.  ^ Ruhlmann, William. "Skip Battin: Skip". AllMusic. Retrieved October 6, 2017.  ^ "Skip Battin: "Central Park" / "The St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns"". Discogs. Retrieved October 6, 2017. 

External links[edit]

St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns Historical Society Website St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns fan club St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns online museum

v t e

Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles

Formerly the Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers and the St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns Based in Baltimore, Maryland

Franchise

History in St. Louis History in Baltimore Seasons No-hitters Records Players Managers Owners and executives Broadcasters Opening Day starting pitchers First-round draft picks

Ballparks

Borchert Field Lloyd Street Grounds Sportsman's Park Memorial Stadium Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Spring training Majestic Park West End Park Coffee Pot Park Wright Field Tech Field Perris Hill Park City Island Ball Park Miami Stadium Ed Smith Stadium Al Lang Stadium Fort Lauderdale Stadium Ed Smith Stadium

Culture

Hall of Fame The Bird "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" Baltimore
Baltimore
Chop "The Letter" (Seinfeld episode)

Lore

Jeffrey Maier Miracle Mets 1910 Chalmers Award Wild Bill Hagy 1999 Cuban national baseball team exhibition 2015 Baltimore
Baltimore
protests

Rivalries

Washington Nationals New York Yankees Boston Red Sox

Key personnel

Owner: Peter Angelos Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations: Dan Duquette Manager: Buck Showalter

World Series Championships (3)

1966 1970 1983

American League Championships (7)

1944 1966 1969 1970 1971 1979 1983

American League
American League
East Championships (9)

1969 1970 1971 1973 1974 1979 1983 1997 2014

American League
American League
Wild Card (3)

1996 2012 2016

Minor league affiliates

AAA: Norfolk Tides AA: Bowie Baysox A Adv.: Frederick Keys A: Delmarva Shorebirds Short A: Aberdeen IronBirds Rookie: GCL Orioles DSL Orioles

Broadcasting

TV Mid-Atlantic Sports Network Radio Orioles Radio Network Announcers Gary Thorne Jim Hunter Jim Palmer Rick Dempsey Mike Bordick

Seasons (117)

1900s

1900 · 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

Histories of teams in Major League Baseball

American League

East

Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
• New York Yankees
Yankees
• Tampa Bay Rays • Toronto Blue Jays

Central

Chicago White Sox
Chicago White Sox
Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
Detroit Tigers
Detroit Tigers
• Kansas City Royals • Minnesota Twins

West

Houston Astros
Houston Astros
Los Angeles Angels
Los Angeles Angels
Oakland Athletics
Oakland Athletics
Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
• Texas Rangers

National League

East

Atlanta Braves
Atlanta Braves
• Miami Marlins • New York Mets • Philadelphia Phillies • Washington Nationals

Central

Chicago Cubs • Cincinnati Reds • Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers • Pittsburgh Pirates • St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals (Part I · II · III · IV)

West

Arizona Diamondbacks • Colorado Rockies • Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
• San Diego Padres • San Francisco Giants

Relocated teams

Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers (1901) • Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(1901–02) • Boston Braves (1870–1953) • St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns (1902–53) • Philadelphia Athletics (1901–54) • New York Giants (1883–1957) • Brooklyn Dodgers (1883–1957) • Washington Senators (1901–60) • Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Braves (1953–65) • Kansas City Athletics (1955–67) • Seattle Pilots
Seattle Pilots
(1969) • Washington Senators (1961–71) • Montreal Expos (1969–2004)

Defunct teams

New York Mutuals
New York Mutuals
(1876) • Athletic of Philadelphia (1876) • Hartford Dark Blues
Hartford Dark Blues
(1875–76) • St. Louis
St. Louis
Brown Stockings (1876–77) • Louisville Grays
Louisville Grays
(1876–77) • Indianapolis Blues (1878) • Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Grays (1878) • Syracuse Stars (1878) • Cincinnati Red Stockings (1876–79) • Cincinnati Stars (1880) • Worcester Worcesters
Worcester Worcesters
(1880–82) • Providence Grays
Providence Grays
(1878–85) • Buffalo Bisons (1879–85) • Cleveland Blues (1879–84) • Troy Trojans (1879–82) • St. Louis
St. Louis
Maroons (1885–86) • Kansas City Cowboys (1886) • Detroit Wolverines
Detroit Wolverines
(1881–88) • Indianapolis Hoosiers (1887–89) • Washington Nationals (1886–89)
Washington Nationals (1886–89)
Cleveland Spiders
Cleveland Spiders
(1887–99) • Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(1892–99) • Louisville Colonels (1892–99) • Washington Senators (1891–99)

v t e

American League

Organization

Parent league: Major League Baseball Partner league: National League Origins: (History Western League) Honorary president: Frank Robinson

Current teams

East

Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles Boston Red Sox New York Yankees Tampa Bay Rays Toronto Blue Jays

Central

Chicago White Sox Cleveland Indians Detroit Tigers Kansas City Royals Minnesota Twins

West

Houston Astros Los Angeles Angels Oakland Athletics Seattle Mariners Texas Rangers

Former, relocated, and disestablished teams

Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(1901–1902) Kansas City Athletics (1955–1967) Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers I (1901) Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Brewers II (1970–1997) Philadelphia Athletics
Philadelphia Athletics
(1901–1954) Seattle Pilots
Seattle Pilots
(1969) St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns (1902–1953) Washington Senators I (1901–1960) Washington Senators II (1961–1971)

Championship play

List of champions Championship Series Division Series Wild Card winners

Related articles

Designated hitter Pro

.