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Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
was the name of several former Major League Baseball ballpark structures in the central United States, in St. Louis, Missouri. All but one of these were located on the same piece of land, at the northwest corner of Grand Boulevard and Dodier Street, on the north side of the city.

Contents

1 History

1.1 1881 structure 1.2 1902 and 1909 structures 1.3 1953 sale 1.4 Replacement

2 Dimensions

2.1 Layout

3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

History[edit] From 1920–1953, Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
was the home field of both the St. Louis Browns of the American League, and the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
of the National League, after which the Browns departed to become the modern-day Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles. The physical street address was 2911 North Grand Boulevard. This ballpark (by then known as Busch Stadium, but still commonly called Sportsman's Park) was also the home of the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
of the National Football League
National Football League
from 1960 through 1965, after the team's relocation from Chicago and before Busch Memorial Stadium opened its doors in 1966. In 1923, the stadium hosted St. Louis's first NFL team, the St. Louis
St. Louis
All-Stars. 1881 structure[edit] Baseball was played on the Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
site as early as 1867. The tract was acquired in 1866 by August Solari, who began staging games there the following year. It was the home of the St. Louis
St. Louis
Brown Stockings in the National Association and the National League
National League
from 1875 to 1877. Originally called the Grand Avenue Ball Grounds. Some sources say the field was renamed Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
in 1876, although local papers were not using that name until 1881. The local papers also still used the alternate name "Grand Avenue Park" until at least 1885. The first grandstand—one of three on the site—was built in 1881. At that time, the diamond and the grandstands were on the southeast corner of the block, for the convenience of fans arriving from Grand Avenue. The park was leased[3] by the then-major American Association entry, the St. Louis
St. Louis
"Brown Stockings", or "Browns". The Browns were a very strong team in the mid-1880s, but their success waned. When the National League
National League
absorbed the strongest of the old Association teams in 1892, the Browns were brought along. Soon they went looking for a new ballpark, finding a site just a few blocks northwest of the old one, and calling it New Sportsman's Park, which was later renamed Robison Field. They also changed team colors from Brown to Cardinal Red, thus acquiring a new nickname, and leaving their previous team colors available, as well as the old ballpark site. 1902 and 1909 structures[edit]

The 1902 version of Sportsman's Park, with the diamond located on the northwest corner.

When the American League
American League
Browns moved from Milwaukee
Milwaukee
in 1902, they built a new version of Sportsman's Park. They initially placed the diamond and the main stand at the northwest corner of the block. This Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
saw football history made. It became both the practice field and home field for Saint Louis University
Saint Louis University
football teams, coached by the visionary Eddie Cochems, father of the forward pass. Although the first legal forward pass was thrown by Saint Louis's Bradbury Robinson
Bradbury Robinson
in a road game at Carroll College in September 1906, Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
was the scene of memorable displays of what Cochems called his "air attack" that season. These included a 39–0 thrashing of Iowa before a crowd of 12,000[4] and a 34–2 trouncing of Kansas witnessed by some 7,000.[5] Robinson launched an amazingly long pass in the game against the Jayhawks, which was variously reported to have traveled 48, 67 or 87 yards in the air. College Football Hall of Fame
College Football Hall of Fame
coach David M. Nelson[6] called the pass extraordinary, "considering the size, shape and weight" of the fat, rugby-style ball used at that time. Sports historian John Sayle Watterson[7] agreed. In his book, College Football: History, Spectacle, Controversy, Watterson described Robinson's long pass as "truly a breathtaking achievement". St. Louis
St. Louis
finished with an 11–0 record in 1906, outscoring its opponents 407–11. In 1909, the Browns moved the diamond to its final location, at the southwest corner, in the shadow of a new steel and concrete grandstand—the third such stadium in the major leagues, and the second in the American League
American League
(after Shibe Park). The previous wooden grandstand was retained as left-field bleachers for a while, but was soon replaced with permanent bleachers. The Cardinals came back to their original home in mid-1920, as tenants of the Browns, after abandoning the outdated, mostly-wooden Robison Field. After nearly winning the American League
American League
Pennant in 1922, Browns owner Phil Ball confidently predicted that there would be a World Series
World Series
in Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
by 1926. In anticipation, he increased the capacity of his ballpark from 18,000 to 30,000. There was a World Series
World Series
in Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
in 1926—but it was the Cardinals, not the Browns, who took part in it, upsetting the Yankees in a memorable seventh game. Although the Browns had been the stronger team in the city for the first quarter of the century, they had never been quite good enough to win a pennant. After the previously weak Cardinals had moved in, the two teams' situations had started to reverse, both on and off the field. The Cardinals' 1926 World Series
1926 World Series
victory more or less permanently tipped the balance in favor of the Cardinals. From then on, the Cardinals were clearly St. Louis' favorite team, while still tenants of the Browns. The 1944 World Series between the Cardinals and the Browns, won by the Cardinals 4 games to 2, was perhaps a good metaphor for the two clubs' respective situations. It remains the last World Series
World Series
to be played entirely in one facility as the home venue for both competing clubs.

The 1946 World Series
1946 World Series
at Sportsman's Park.

In addition to its primary use as a baseball stadium, Sportsman's Park also hosted several soccer events. These included several the St. Louis Soccer League and the 1948 National Challenge Cup when St. Louis Simpkins-Ford defeated Brookhattan for the national soccer championship. In 1936, Browns owner Phil Ball died. His family sold the Browns to businessman Donald Lee Barnes, but the Ball estate maintained ownership of Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
until 1946, when it was sold to the Browns for an estimated price of over US$1 million.[8] 1953 sale[edit] By the early 1950s, it was clear that the city could not support both teams. Bill Veeck, owner of the Browns (who at one point lived with his family in an apartment under the park's stands),[9] fancied that he could drive the Cardinals out of town through his promotional skills. He caught an unlucky break when the Cardinals' owner, Fred Saigh, pleaded no contest to tax evasion. Faced with certain banishment from baseball, Saigh sold the Cardinals to Anheuser-Busch in February 1953.[10][11] Veeck soon realized that the Cardinals now had more resources at their disposal than he could hope to match, and decided to move the Browns out of town. As a first step, he sold Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
to the Cardinals for $800,000.[12][13][14] Veeck would have probably had to sell the park anyway,[speculation?] as the Browns could not afford to make repairs necessary to bring the park up to code. Busch had the money, and the ballpark was soon renovated. Meanwhile, by the next year, the Browns relocated to Baltimore
Baltimore
and were renamed as the Orioles, which has been the name of the team ever since. The brewery originally wanted to name the ballpark Budweiser Stadium.[15] Commissioner Ford Frick
Ford Frick
vetoed the name because of public relations concerns over naming a ballpark after a brand of beer. However, the commissioner could not stop Anheuser-Busch
Anheuser-Busch
president August Busch, Jr. from renaming it after himself, and so he did; many fans still called it by the old name. The Anheuser Busch "eagle" model that sat atop the left field scoreboard flapped its wings after a Cardinal home run.[9] The next year, Anheuser Busch introduced a new economy lager branded as "Busch Bavarian Beer", thus gaming Frick's ruling and allowing the ballpark's name to be branded by what would eventually be Anheuser-Busch's second most popular beer brand.[16]

The park's site is now occupied by a Boys and Girls Club, including an athletic field at the same location of the original playing field (top). A sign at Grand & Dodier marks the stadium's site (bottom).

Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
/ Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
was the site of a number of World Series contests, first way back in the mid-1880s, and then in the modern era. The 1964 Series was particularly memorable, the park's last, and featured brother against brother, Ken Boyer
Ken Boyer
of the Cardinals and Clete Boyer of the Yankees. The Cardinals' triumph in seven games led to Yankees management replacing Yogi Berra
Yogi Berra
with the Cardinals' ex-manager Johnny Keane (he had resigned after winning the Series), an arrangement which lasted only to early 1966. Both Series managers were St. Louis
St. Louis
natives, but neither had ever played for the Cardinals. The stadium also hosted Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
All-Star Games in 1940, 1948, and 1957. Replacement[edit] Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
/ Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
was replaced early in the 1966 season by Busch Memorial Stadium, during which time much was made of baseball having been played on the old site for more than a century. A helicopter carried home plate to Busch Memorial Stadium
Busch Memorial Stadium
after the final Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
game on May 8, 1966.[9][17] The 1966 stadium was replaced forty years later by the new Busch Stadium
Busch Stadium
in April 2006.[18] Donated by the August Busch, the Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
site is now home to the Herbert Hoover
Herbert Hoover
Boys and Girls Club.[19][20] While the grandstand was torn down 52 years ago in late 1966, the diamond was still intact at the time the structures were cleared, and the field is now used for other sports. Dimensions[edit] For a small park, there were plenty of posted distance markers. The final major remodeling was done in 1926. Distance markers had appeared by the 1940s:[1]

Dimension Distance Notes

Left Field Line 351 ft (107 m)

Medium Left Center 358 ft (109 m)

True Left Center 379 ft (116 m)

Deep Left Center 400 ft (122 m)

Deep Left Center Field Corner 426 ft (130 m) The distance usually given for center field (sign later painted over)

Just to right of Deep Left Center Field Corner 425 ft (130 m)

True Center Field 422 ft (129 m) Just to left of Deep Right Center Field Corner

Deep Right Center Field Corner Also 422 ft (129 m) Almost true center field (sign later painted over)

Deep Right Center 405 ft (123 m)

True Right Center 354 ft (108 m)

Medium Right Center 322 ft (98 m)

Right Field Line 310 ft (94 m)

Backstop 68 ft (21 m)

The following links provide images of the field's markers.

Photo of left field markers Photo of center and right center field markers Photo of right field markers

The diamond was conventionally aligned east-northeast (home plate to center field),[21][22] and the elevation of the field was approximately 500 feet (150 m) above sea level.[21] Layout[edit] The left field and right field walls ran toward center, roughly perpendicular to the foul lines or at right angles to each other. The center field area was a short diagonal segment connecting the two longer walls. When distance markers were first posted, there was a 426 marker at the left corner of that segment, and a 422 marker at the right corner of it. There was another 422 marker a few feet to the left of the other one, and that marked "true" center field. For symmetry, a corresponding marker (425) was set a few feet to the right of the 426. The two corner markers were eventually painted over, leaving just the 425 and the true centerfield 422. [1] See also[edit]

Soccer in St. Louis

References[edit]

^ a b c d Ballparks.com – Sportsman's Park ^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2018.  ^ Hetrick, J. Thomas (1999). Chris Von der Ahe and the St. Louis Browns. Lanham, Maryland.: Scarecrow. p. 151. ISBN 0-8108-3473-1.  ^ "First Touchdown Is Scored After Few Minutes of Play", St. Louis Post-Dispatch, November 30, 1906 ^ " St. Louis
St. Louis
U. Scores 12 Points in First Half of Great Game with Kansas", St. Louis
St. Louis
Star-Chronicle, November 3, 1906 ^ Nelson, David M.,The Anatomy of a Game: Football, the Rules, and the Men Who Made the Game, 1994 ^ The Johns Hopkins University Press webpage on John Sayle Watterson ^ "Browns purchase Sportsman's Park". Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Journal. Associated Press. October 3, 1946. p. 8, part 2.  ^ a b c Lowry, Philip (2006). Green Cathedrals. Walker & Company. p. 202. ISBN 978-0-8027-1608-8.  ^ "Cardinals purchased by brewery $3,750,000". Spokane Daily Chronicle. Spokane, Washington. Associated Press. February 20, 1953. p. 11.  ^ "Cards sold to St. Louis
St. Louis
brewery". Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Sentinel. Associated Press. February 21, 1953. p. 3, part 2.  ^ "Cards buy Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
for $800,000, 'save' Browns". Milwaukee Sentinel. Associated Press. April 10, 1953. p. 2, part 2.  ^ "Cards buy Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
from Browns in $800,000 transaction". The Day. New London, Connecticut. Associated Press. April 10, 1953. p. 15.  ^ " Beer
Beer
company plans to deal baseball's Cardinals". Lodi News-Sentinel. Associated Press. October 26, 1995. p. 13.  ^ "Budweiser tag given baseball park in St. Louis". Times-News. Hendersonville, North Carolina. United Press. April 10, 1953. p. 8.  ^ Ferkovich, Scott. " Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
(St. Louis)". Society for American Baseball Research. Retrieved 15 January 2018.  ^ "Giants win 8th in a row". Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Sentinel. UPI. May 9, 1966. p. 2, part 2.  ^ Haudricourt, Tom (April 11, 2006). "Same name, fresh look". Milwaukee
Milwaukee
Journal Sentinel. p. 5C.  ^ Temple, Wick (January 30, 1966). "Old stadium due change this year". Tuscaloosa News. Alabama. Associated Press. p. 15.  ^ "Sportsman Park is alive, although Cards have gone". Tuscaloosa News. Alabama. Associated Press. May 9, 1976. p. 11B.  ^ a b "38.658 N, 90.220 W". Historic Aerials. Retrieved January 9, 2016.  ^ "Objectives of the Game – rule 1.04". Major League Baseball. Retrieved January 9, 2016. 

Further reading[edit]

Green Cathedrals, by Philip J. Lowry Ballparks of North America, by Michael Benson St. Louis' Big League Ballparks, by Joan M. Thomas The Year Babe Ruth Hit 104 Home Runs, by Bill Jenkinson Dimensions drawn from baseball annuals.

External links[edit]

" Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
photographs". University of Missouri–St. Louis.  (also available published via Flickr) KETC – Living St. Louis
St. Louis
Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
8:42 minutes of video, footage of Sportsman's Park
Sportsman's Park
in b&w and color and interviews assembled by local PBS station KETC Photos of Sportsman's Park: http://www.digitalballparks.com/National/Sportsmans.html

Links to related articles

Events and tenants

Preceded by None Home of the St. Louis Brown Stockings
St. Louis Brown Stockings
(AA) 1882–1893 Succeeded by Robison Field

Preceded by Union Grounds Home of the St. Louis
St. Louis
Maroons (NL) 1885–1886 Succeeded by Athletic Park

Preceded by Lloyd Street Grounds Home of the St. Louis
St. Louis
Browns (AL) 1902–1953 Succeeded by Memorial Stadium

Preceded by Robison Field Home of the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(NL) 1920–1966 Succeeded by Busch Memorial Stadium

Preceded by Soldier Field Home of the St. Louis Cardinals
St. Louis Cardinals
(NFL) 1960–1965 Succeeded by Busch Memorial Stadium

Preceded by Yankee Stadium Wrigley Field Griffith Stadium Host of the All-Star Game 1940 1948 1957 Succeeded by Briggs Stadium Ebbets Field Memorial Stadium

v t e

St. Louis
St. Louis
Maroons/ Indianapolis
Indianapolis
Hoosiers

Based in St. Louis, Missouri
Missouri
(1884-1886); Indianapolis, Indiana (1887-1889)

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Players Managers

Ballparks

Union Grounds Sportsman's Park Athletic Park

Seasons

1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889

v t e

Arizona Cardinals

Founded in 1898 Played in Chicago (1920–59), St. Louis
St. Louis
(1960–87), and formerly the Phoenix Cardinals (1988–93) Based in Glendale, Arizona Headquartered in Tempe, Arizona

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Culture

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1925 Chicago Cardinals– Milwaukee
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Rivalries

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Division championships (7)

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Conference championships (1)

2008

League championships (2)

1925 1947

Retired numbers

8 40 77 88 99

Current league affiliations

League: National Football League Conference: National Football Conference Division: West Division

Seasons (98)

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Championship seasons in bold

v t e

Baltimore
Baltimore
Orioles

Formerly the Milwaukee
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Brewers and the St. Louis
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Browns Based in Baltimore, Maryland

Franchise

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Ballparks

Borchert Field Lloyd Street Grounds Sportsman's Park Memorial Stadium Oriole Park at Camden Yards

Spring training Majestic Park West End Park Coffee Pot Park Wright Field Tech Field Perris Hill Park City Island Ball Park Miami Stadium Ed Smith Stadium Al Lang Stadium Fort Lauderdale Stadium Ed Smith Stadium

Culture

Hall of Fame The Bird "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" Baltimore
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Chop "The Letter" (Seinfeld episode)

Lore

Jeffrey Maier Miracle Mets 1910 Chalmers Award Wild Bill Hagy 1999 Cuban national baseball team exhibition 2015 Baltimore
Baltimore
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Rivalries

Washington Nationals New York Yankees Boston Red Sox

Key personnel

Owner: Peter Angelos Executive Vice President of Baseball Operations: Dan Duquette Manager: Buck Showalter

World Series Championships (3)

1966 1970 1983

American League Championships (7)

1944 1966 1969 1970 1971 1979 1983

American League
American League
East Championships (9)

1969 1970 1971 1973 1974 1979 1983 1997 2014

American League
American League
Wild Card (3)

1996 2012 2016

Minor league affiliates

AAA: Norfolk Tides AA: Bowie Baysox A Adv.: Frederick Keys A: Delmarva Shorebirds Short A: Aberdeen IronBirds Rookie: GCL Orioles DSL Orioles

Broadcasting

TV Mid-Atlantic Sports Network Radio Orioles Radio Network Announcers Gary Thorne Jim Hunter Jim Palmer Rick Dempsey Mike Bordick

Seasons (117)

1900s

1900 · 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

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1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

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1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

St. Louis
St. Louis
Cardinals

Based in St. Louis, Missouri

Franchise

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History

1875–1919 1920–52 1953–89 1990–present Seasons

Ballparks

Robison Field Sportsman's Park Busch Memorial Stadium Busch Stadium

Spring training

Whittington Park Herald Park West End Park City Park City Island Ball Park Ninth Street Park Al Lang Stadium Roger Dean Stadium

Culture

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Lore

1946 NL tie-breaker series Slaughter's Mad Dash Brock for Broglio "Go Crazy, Folks!" The Call Home run chase Fernando Tatís' two grand slams 2011 World Series
World Series
Game 6 2017 MLB Little League Classic

Rivalries

Chicago Cubs Kansas City Royals

Key personnel

Owner: Bill DeWitt, Jr. President of Baseball Operations: John Mozeliak General Manager: Mike Girsch Manager: Mike Matheny

Minor league affiliates

AAA Memphis Redbirds AA Springfield Cardinals A Adv. Palm Beach Cardinals A Peoria Chiefs Short A State College Spikes Rookie Adv. Johnson City Cardinals Rookie Gulf Coast League Cardinals Dominican Summer League Cardinals

World Series Championships

pre-MLB

1885 1886

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1926 1931 1934 1942 1944 1946 1964 1967 1982 2006 2011

League pennants

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1885 1886 1887 1888

National League

1926 1928 1930 1931 1934 1942 1943 1944 1946 1964 1967 1968 1982 1985 1987 2004 2006 2011 2013

Division titles

National League
National League
East 1982 1985 1987 National League
National League
Central 1996 2000 2001 2002 2004 2005 2006 2009 2013 2014 2015

Wild card titles

2001 2011 2012

All Star Games hosted

1940 1957 1966 2009

Seasons (137)

1880s

1880 · 1881 · 1882 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889

1890s

1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900s

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

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1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

St. Louis
St. Louis
All-Stars

Defunct National Football League
National Football League
club in 1923 Based in St. Louis, Missouri

Franchise

History Players

Head coaches

Ollie Kraehe

NFL seasons

1923

Lore

The Dolly Gray Impostor

Owner

Ollie Kraehe

Stadia

Sportsman's Park

Seasons

1923

v t e

Defunct stadiums of the National Football League

Early era: 1920–1940

Akron's League Park American League
American League
Park Armory Park Baker Bowl Bellevue Park Bison Stadium Borchert Field Bosse Field Braves Field Buffalo Baseball Park Canisius College Canton's League Field Chicago Stadium City Stadium Cleveland Municipal Stadium Comiskey Park Commercial Field Cub's Park Cycledrome Dinan Field Douglas Park Duluth's Athletic Park Dunn Field East Hartford Velodrome Ebbets Field Eclipse Park Fenway Park Forbes Field Frankford Stadium Griffith Stadium Hagemeister Park Horlick Field Kinsley Park Knights of Columbus Stadium Lexington Park Luna Park Minersville Park Muehlebach Field Nash Field Navin Field Newark Schools Stadium Newark Velodrome Nickerson Field Nicollet Park Normal Park Parkway Field Philadelphia Municipal Stadium Polo Grounds Shaw Stadium Spartan Municipal Stadium Sportsman's Park Staley Field Star Park
Star Park
(possible) Swayne Field Thompson Stadium Tiger Stadium Triangle Park Wisconsin State Fair Park Yankee Stadium (1923)

Merger era: 1941–1970

Alumni Stadium Astrodome Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium Balboa Stadium Baltimore
Baltimore
Memorial Stadium Busch Memorial Stadium Busch Stadium Cleveland Municipal Stadium Comiskey Park Dyche Stadium Ebbets Field Fenway Park Forbes Field Frank Youell Field Franklin Field Griffith Stadium Harvard Stadium Jeppesen Stadium Kansas City Municipal Stadium Kezar Stadium Metropolitan Stadium Miami Orange Bowl Milwaukee
Milwaukee
County Stadium Nickerson Field Nippert Stadium Philadelphia Municipal Stadium Pitt Stadium Polo Grounds Rice Stadium Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium Shibe Park Tiger Stadium Tulane Stadium Wisconsin State Fair Park Wrigley Field Yankee Stadium (1923)

Current era: 1971–present

Anaheim Stadium Astrodome Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium Busch Memorial Stadium Candlestick Park Cleveland Stadium Cotton Bowl The Dome at America's Center Foxboro Stadium Georgia Dome Giants Stadium Hubert H. Humphrey Metrodome Kansas City Municipal Stadium Kingdome Metropolitan Stadium Miami Orange Bowl Mile High Stadium Milwaukee
Milwaukee
County Stadium Qualcomm Stadium RCA Dome Robert F. Kennedy Memorial Stadium Riverfront Stadium Shea Stadium Silverdome Sun Devil Stadium Tampa Stadium Texas Stadium Three Rivers Stadium Tiger Stadium Tulane Stadium Veterans Stadium War Memorial Stadium (Buffalo) Yankee Stadium (1923)

Stadiums used by NFL teams temporarily

Alamodome
Alamodome
(New Orleans Saints)1 Champaign Memorial Stadium (Chicago Bears)† Clemson Memorial Stadium (Carolina Panthers)† Frankford High School's Community Memorial Stadium (Frankford Yellow Jackets)1 Giants Stadium
Giants Stadium
(New Orleans Saints)1 Grant Field (Atlanta Falcons) Husky Stadium
Husky Stadium
(Seattle Seahawks)1† Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium
Liberty Bowl Memorial Stadium
(Tennessee Oilers)† LSU Tiger Stadium (New Orleans Saints)1 Marquette Stadium
Marquette Stadium
(Green Bay Packers) Philadelphia Municipal Stadium (Philadelphia Eagles)1 Shibe Park1 Stanford Stadium
Stanford Stadium
(San Francisco 49ers)1 TCF Bank Stadium
TCF Bank Stadium
(Minnesota Vikings)1† University of Minnesota Memorial Stadium (Minnesota Vikings)1 Vanderbilt Stadium
Vanderbilt Stadium
(Tennessee Titans)† Yale Bowl
Yale Bowl
(New York Giants)†

†= Team's stadium under construction or refurbishment at time 1 = A team used the stadium when their permanent stadium was unable to be used as a result of damage.

v t e

Jewel box baseball parks

Major League Baseball

American League

Comiskey Park Fenway Park Griffith Stadium League Park Shibe Park Sportsman's Park Navin Field/Briggs Stadium/Tiger Stadium Yankee Stadium I

National League

Baker Bowl Braves Field Redland Field/Crosley Field Ebbets Field Forbes Field Polo Grounds
Polo Grounds
IV Weeghman Park/Cubs Park/Wrigley Field

Nippon Professional Baseball

Central League

Hanshin Koshien Stadium

Ballparks in bold are s

.