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Sisak
Sisak
(Croatian: [sǐːsak]; Hungarian: Sziszek [ˈsisɛk]; also known by other alternative names) is a city and episcopal see in central Croatia, located at the confluence of the Kupa, Sava
Sava
and Odra rivers, 57 km (35 mi) southeast of the Croatian capital Zagreb, and is usually considered to be where the Posavina
Posavina
(Sava basin) begins, with an elevation of 99 m. The city's total population in 2011 was 47,768 of which 33,322 live in the urban settlement (naselje).[3] Sisak
Sisak
is the administrative centre of the Sisak-Moslavina County, Croatia's biggest river port and a centre of river shipping industry (Dunavski Lloyd). It lies on the main road Zagreb-Sisak-Petrinja (M12.2) and the railroad Zagreb-Sisak-Sunja. Sisak
Sisak
is a regional economic, cultural and historical center. The largest oil refinery in Croatia
Croatia
is located here.[4]

Contents

1 Name 2 History

2.1 Roman empire 2.2 Middle Ages 2.3 Early modern 2.4 Modern 2.5 Contemporary

3 Population 4 Municipal makeup 5 Miscellaneous 6 Geography

6.1 Climate

7 International relations

7.1 Twin towns — Sister cities

8 See also 9 References

9.1 Bibliography 9.2 Notes

10 External links

Name[edit] Prior to belonging to the Roman Empire, which gave it the Latin name Siscia, the region was Celtic and Illyrian and the city there was named Segestica.[5] In German the town is known as Sissek, in Hungarian as Sziszek, Latin as Siscia and in Kajkavian
Kajkavian
and Slovene as Sisek. History[edit] Roman empire[edit]

Vetranio
Vetranio
coin struck at Siscia mint in 350.

During the Roman Empire
Roman Empire
when Sisak
Sisak
was part of the Roman province
Roman province
of Pannonia
Pannonia
as Siscia, a Roman mint in the city produced coins under a series of emperors between 262 and 383 AD.[6] The Christian
Christian
martyr Quirinus of Sescia, presumed the first bishop of the Diocese of Sescia, was tortured and nearly killed during Diocletian's persecution of Christians. Legend has it that they tied him to a millstone and threw him into a river, but he freed himself from the weight, escaped and continued to preach his faith. Today he is the patron saint of Sisak. When Diocletian
Diocletian
split Pannonia
Pannonia
into four provinces, Siscia became the capital of Pannonia
Pannonia
Savia, the southwestern one. Middle Ages[edit] Braslav of Lower Pannonia
Pannonia
reigned from Sisak
Sisak
until he was killed in the Hungarian invasion ca. 898.[7] According to Historia Salonitana, Duke Tomislav reclaimed it soon after.[8][9] Early modern[edit]

Veliki Kaptol

The 16th-century triangular fortress of the Old Town, well-preserved and turned into the Native Museum, is the main destination of every tourist. The fortress is famous for the victory of the joint forces of Croats, Austrians and Carniolans (Slovenes) over the Ottomans in 1593, known as the Battle of Sisak. It was one of the early significant defeats of the up-to-then invincible Ottoman army on European territory. The Croatian Ban Thomas Erdődy
Thomas Erdődy
who led the defense in this battle became famous throughout Europe. The Baroque
Baroque
palace of Mali Kaptol, the classicist Veliki Kaptol, the brick Stari most ("Old Bridge") over the Kupa, and the ethnological park are the most frequently visited landmarks. Modern[edit] In the late 19th and early 20th century, Sisak
Sisak
was a district capital in the Zagreb
Zagreb
County of the Kingdom of Croatia-Slavonia. Contemporary[edit] From 1929-39, Sisak
Sisak
was part of the Sava
Sava
Banovina and from 1939-41 of the Banovina of Croatia
Croatia
within the Kingdom of Yugoslavia. During World War II, Sisak children's concentration camp
Sisak children's concentration camp
was set up by the Croatian Axis Ustaše
Ustaše
government for Serbian, Jewish
Jewish
and Romani children. It is estimated that 1,152–2,000 children were killed in the camp.[10] With the outbreak of the Croatian War
Croatian War
in 1991, Sisak
Sisak
remained in Government hands while the territory to the south was controlled by rebelled Serbs. During the war, the Serb forces often shelled the city, causing dozens of civilian casualties and extensive damage to the city's industry.[11] The war ended with the Operation Storm (1995).[citation needed] Population[edit]

Historical population of Sisak

Year Pop. ±%

1857 15,738 —    

1869 18,669 +18.6%

1880 24,433 +30.9%

1890 38,181 +56.3%

1900 51,821 +35.7%

1910 73,831 +42.5%

1921 102,912 +39.4%

1931 138,414 +34.5%

1948 11,293 −91.8%

1953 12,921 +14.4%

1961 26,821 +107.6%

1971 39,633 +47.8%

1981 65,822 +66.1%

1991 78,531 +19.3%

2001 76,212 −3.0%

2011 75,768 −0.6%

Source: Naselja i stanovništvo Republike Hrvatske 1857–2001, DZS, Zagreb, 2005 & Popis stanovništva 2011

In the 2011 census, of the total population of 47,768 there were 40,590 Croats
Croats
(84.97%), 3,071 Serbs
Serbs
(6.43%), 1,646 Bosniaks
Bosniaks
(3.45%), 648 Romani (1.36%), 179 Albanians
Albanians
(0.37%), 29 Montenegrins (0.06%), and the rest were other ethnicities. In the 2011 census, the population by religion was 37,319 Roman Catholics (78.13%; since 2009 again served by their own Diocese of Sisak), 3,279 Orthodox Christians
Orthodox Christians
(6.86%), 2,442 Muslims
Muslims
(5.11%) and others. Municipal makeup[edit] The city's administrative area is composed of the following settlements:[2]

Blinjski Kut, population 278 Budaševo, population 1,660 Bukovsko, population 89 Crnac, population 553 Čigoč, population 97 Donje Komarevo, population 322 Gornje Komarevo, population 508 Greda, population 861 Gušće, population 387 Hrastelnica, population 898 Jazvenik, population 142 Klobučak, population 68 Kratečko, population 200 Letovanci, population 52 Lonja, population 111 Lukavec Posavski, population 127 Madžari, population 235 Mužilovčica, population 74 Novo Pračno, population 444 Novo Selo, population 624 Novo Selo Palanječko, population 517 Odra Sisačka, population 814 Palanjek, population 318 Prelošćica, population 528 Sela, population 969 Sisak, population 33,049 Stara Drenčina, population 223 Staro Pračno, population 896 Staro Selo, population 110 Stupno, population 480 Suvoj, population 42 Topolovac, population 894 Veliko Svinjičko, population 271 Vurot, population 102 Žabno, population 509

Miscellaneous[edit]

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Steam locomotive in front of the Sisak
Sisak
railway station

Chief occupations are farming, ferrous metallurgy (iron works), chemicals, leather (footwear), textiles and food processing plants (dairy products, alcoholic beverages), building material, crude oil refinery and thermal power. Sisak
Sisak
features the largest metallurgic factory and the largest oil refinery in Croatia. Sisak
Sisak
has many rich mineral springs (spas) with healing properties in the temperature range from 42 to 54 °C (108 to 129 °F). The city hosts University of Zagreb's Faculty of Metallurgy. Sports and recreation facilities in the town and the surroundings include mainly the waters and alluvial plains a public beach on the Kupa. All rivers (Kupa, Odra, Sava) with their backwaters offer fishing opportunities. There are hunting grounds in the regions of Turopolje
Turopolje
and Posavina. Sisak
Sisak
is the starting point for sightseeing tours into Lonjsko Polje
Lonjsko Polje
(Field of Lonja
Lonja
river) nature park. The local football club is HNK Segesta. Sisak
Sisak
features the oldest ice hockey club in Croatia, KHL Sisak est. 1934.[citation needed] Geography[edit] Climate[edit]

Climate data for Sisak
Sisak
(1971–2000, extremes 1949–2014)

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °C (°F) 21.4 (70.5) 23.4 (74.1) 27.4 (81.3) 31.1 (88) 34.3 (93.7) 38.1 (100.6) 39.8 (103.6) 40.0 (104) 34.9 (94.8) 29.6 (85.3) 25.0 (77) 23.7 (74.7) 40.0 (104)

Average high °C (°F) 3.7 (38.7) 6.8 (44.2) 12.2 (54) 16.7 (62.1) 21.9 (71.4) 24.8 (76.6) 27.0 (80.6) 26.6 (79.9) 22.4 (72.3) 16.2 (61.2) 9.1 (48.4) 4.7 (40.5) 16.0 (60.8)

Daily mean °C (°F) 0.5 (32.9) 2.4 (36.3) 6.8 (44.2) 11.2 (52.2) 16.2 (61.2) 19.4 (66.9) 21.2 (70.2) 20.4 (68.7) 16.1 (61) 10.8 (51.4) 5.3 (41.5) 1.5 (34.7) 11.0 (51.8)

Average low °C (°F) −3.1 (26.4) −2.0 (28.4) 1.5 (34.7) 5.4 (41.7) 9.9 (49.8) 13.1 (55.6) 14.7 (58.5) 14.3 (57.7) 10.5 (50.9) 6.1 (43) 1.6 (34.9) −1.7 (28.9) 5.9 (42.6)

Record low °C (°F) −25.2 (−13.4) −25 (−13) −18.4 (−1.1) −5 (23) −2.3 (27.9) 1.9 (35.4) 5.4 (41.7) 3.9 (39) −1.8 (28.8) −7.2 (19) −15.6 (3.9) −19.2 (−2.6) −25.2 (−13.4)

Average precipitation mm (inches) 49.0 (1.929) 48.2 (1.898) 55.0 (2.165) 69.4 (2.732) 79.4 (3.126) 94.7 (3.728) 80.2 (3.157) 77.8 (3.063) 84.5 (3.327) 78.7 (3.098) 91.1 (3.587) 68.3 (2.689) 876.1 (34.492)

Average precipitation days (≥ 0.1 mm) 11.7 10.9 11.6 13.8 13.0 13.8 10.9 10.1 11.5 12.3 12.0 12.4 143.9

Average snowy days (≥ 1.0 cm) 11.8 8.4 2.5 0.4 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 0.0 3.5 8.3 34.8

Average relative humidity (%) 85.0 78.7 71.3 68.5 69.8 71.1 71.1 74.9 79.9 82.8 85.8 87.3 77.2

Mean monthly sunshine hours 52.7 93.2 142.6 174.0 235.6 246.0 285.2 257.3 186.0 114.7 54.0 43.4 1,884.7

Source: Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service[12][13]

International relations[edit]

Sisak
Sisak
oil refinery

See also: List of twin towns and sister cities in Croatia Twin towns — Sister cities[edit] Sisak
Sisak
is twinned with:

Gabrovo, Bulgaria
Bulgaria
(since 2004)[14] Heidenheim, Germany
Germany
(since 1988) Remchingen, Germany
Germany
(since 1993)

Szombathely, Hungary
Hungary
(since 2003) Leszno, Poland
Poland
(since 2003) Jihlava, Czech Republic
Czech Republic
(since 2004)

See also[edit]

Sisak
Sisak
(eponym) List of people from Sisak Roman Catholic Diocese of Sisak

References[edit] Bibliography[edit]

Cresswell, Peterjon; Atkins, Ismay; Dunn, Lily (10 July 2006). Time Out Croatia
Croatia
(First ed.). London, Berkeley & Toronto: Time Out Group Ltd & Ebury Publishing, Random House Ltd. 20 Vauxhall Bridge Road, London SV1V 2SA. ISBN 978-1-904978-70-1. Retrieved 10 March 2010. 

Notes[edit]

^ "2013 Lokalni". Izbori.hr. Retrieved 2015-12-08.  ^ a b "Population by Age and Sex, by Settlements, 2011 Census: Sisak". Census of Population, Households and Dwellings 2011. Zagreb: Croatian Bureau of Statistics. December 2012.  ^ "Državni zavod za statistiku Republike Hrvatske". Dzs.hr. Retrieved 2015-12-08.  ^ [1] Archived 1 May 2007 at the Wayback Machine. ^ John T. Koch (2006). Celtic Culture. p. 1662. ISBN 1-85109-440-7.  ^ "Details for issuing mint located at Siscia (Sisak, Croatia)". Finds.org.uk. 1999-02-22. Retrieved 2015-12-08.  ^ John Van Antwerp Fine; John V. A. Fine, Jr. (2006). When Ethnicity Did Not Matter in the Balkans. University of Michigan Press. p. 28. ISBN 0-472-11414-X.  ^ John Van Antwerp Fine; John V. A. Fine, Jr. (2006). When Ethnicity Did Not Matter in the Balkans. University of Michigan Press. p. 178. ISBN 0-472-11414-X.  ^ Stanko Guldescu (1964). History of Medieval Croatia. Mouton. p. 113.  ^ "Sisak: Srbi traže da logor za djecu uđe u udžbenike". Glassrpske.com. Retrieved 2015-12-08.  ^ "11 kaznenih prijava za razaranje Siska". Jutarnji list
Jutarnji list
(in Croatian). 27 January 2007. Archived from the original on 28 September 2015. Retrieved 27 September 2015.  ^ " Sisak
Sisak
Climate Normals" (PDF). Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service. Retrieved 3 December 2015.  ^ "Mjesečne vrijednosti za Sisak
Sisak
u razdoblju1949−2014" (in Croatian). Croatian Meteorological and Hydrological Service. Retrieved 3 December 2015.  ^ "Twin Towns". Gabrovo.bg. Archived from the original on 2 August 2014. Retrieved 27 April 2014. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Sisak.

Wikisource
Wikisource
has the text of the 1913 Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
article Croatia.

Official website Sisak
Sisak
News Portal Radio Sisak
Sisak
- Hometown radio station Sisak
Sisak
Tourism Photo Gallery of Sisak  Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Sissek". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

v t e

County seats of Croatia

   

Bjelovar, Bjelovar-Bilogora Slavonski Brod, Brod-Posavina Dubrovnik, Dubrovnik-Neretva Pazin, Istria

Karlovac, Karlovac Koprivnica, Koprivnica-Križevci Krapina, Krapina-Zagorje Gospić, Lika-Senj

Čakovec, Međimurje Osijek, Osijek-Baranja Požega, Požega-Slavonia Rijeka, Primorje-Gorski Kotar

Sisak, Sisak-Moslavina Split, Split-Dalmatia Šibenik, Šibenik-Knin Varaždin, Varaždin

Virovitica, Virovitica-Podravina Vukovar, Vukovar-Srijem Zadar, Zadar Zagreb, Zagreb

v t e

Cities and towns of Croatia
Croatia
by population

100,000+

Osijek Rijeka Split Zagreb

35,000+

Bjelovar Dubrovnik Karlovac Kaštela Pula Samobor Šibenik Sisak Slavonski Brod Varaždin Velika Gorica Vinkovci Zadar

10,000+

Beli Manastir Belišće Benkovac Čakovec Crikvenica Đakovo Daruvar Donji Miholjac Duga Resa Dugo Selo Garešnica Gospić Imotski Ivanec Ivanić-Grad Jastrebarsko Kastav Knin Koprivnica Krapina Križevci Kutina Labin Makarska Metković Našice Nova Gradiška Novi Marof Novska Ogulin Omiš Opatija Petrinja Pleternica Ploče Popovača Poreč Požega Rovinj Sinj Slatina Solin Sveta Nedelja Sveti Ivan Zelina Trogir Umag Valpovo Virovitica Vrbovec Vukovar Zaprešić Županja

v t e

Subdivisions of Sisak-Moslavina County

Cities and towns

Glina Hrvatska Kostajnica Kutina Novska Petrinja Popovača Sisak
Sisak
(seat)

Municipalities

Donji Kukuruzari Dvor Gvozd Hrvatska Dubica Jasenovac Lekenik Lipovljani Majur Martinska Ves Sunja Topusko Velika Ludina

Coordinates: 45°28′N 16°23′E / 45.467°N 16.383°E / 45.467; 16.383

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 244263

.