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The Semang
Semang
are the Negrito
Negrito
and Austric ethnic groups of the Malay Peninsula.[3][4] They are found in Perak, Kedah
Kedah
and Pahang
Pahang
of Malaysia.[5] During the colonial British administration, Orang Asli living in the northern Malay Peninsula
Malay Peninsula
were classified as Sakai.[6] Lowland Semang
Semang
tribes are also known as Sakai, although this term is considered to be derogatory by the Semang
Semang
people.[7] They have been recorded to have lived here since before the 3rd century. They are ethnologically described as nomadic hunter-gatherers. See also Bajaus and Aetas.[8]

Contents

1 Ethnic groups 2 Culture 3 See also 4 References 5 Further reading 6 External links

Ethnic groups[edit]

Map from Pagan Races of the Malay Peninsula
Malay Peninsula
(1906). Blue = Semang; yellow = Sakai tribe; red = Jakun people.

Orang Asli
Orang Asli
ethnic groups that are classified as "Semang" by the Malaysian government.

Batek people Lanoh people Jahai people Mani people[9] Kensiu people Kintaq people Mendriq people

Culture[edit]

A Semang
Semang
man in Malaya, 1906

The Semangs live in caves or leaf-shelters that form between branches. A loincloth for the men, made of tree bark hammered out with a wooden mallet from the bark of the terap, a species of wild bread-fruit tree, and a short skirt of the same material for the women decorated with segments of bamboo in patterns to magically protect its wearer from disease, is the only dress worn;[10] some go naked although not customary.[11] Scarification
Scarification
is practised.[12] Young boys and girls are scarified in a simple ritual to mark the end of their adolescence.[13] The finely serrated edge of a sugarcane leaf is drawn across the skin, then charcoal powder rubbed into the cut.[14] They have bamboo musical instruments, a kind of jaw harp, and a nose flute.[15] On festive occasions, there is song and dance, both sexes decorating themselves with leaves.[16][17] The Semang
Semang
bury their dead on the same day itself with the corpse wrapped in mat and the personal belonging of the deceased kept in a small bamboo rack placed over the grave.[18] Only people of great importance, such as chiefs or great magicians are given a tree burial.[19] They have used Capnomancy (divination by smoke) to determine whether a camp is safe for the night.[20] In 1906, the Thai King Chulalongkorn
King Chulalongkorn
adopted a Semang
Semang
orphan boy named Khanung.[21] See also[edit]

Aeta
Aeta
peoples Andamanese people Australian Aborigines Papuan peoples Melanesians

References[edit]

^ Geoffrey Benjamin & Cynthia Chou (2002). Tribal Communities in the Malay World: Historical, Cultural and Social Perspectives. Institute of Southeast Asian Studies. p. 36. ISBN 98-123-0167-4.  ^ " Kensiu in Thailand". Joshua Project. Retrieved 2016-11-10.  ^ "35 Map". The Andaman Association. 18 August 2002. Archived from the original on 20 November 2003. Retrieved 2017-11-23.  ^ "35. The Negrito
Negrito
of Malaysia: Semang". The Andaman Association. 18 August 2002. Archived from the original on 25 December 2002. Retrieved 2017-11-23.  ^ Nik Hassan Shuhaimi Nik Abdul Rahman (1998). The Encyclopedia of Malaysia: Early History, Volume 4. Archipelago Press. ISBN 981-3018-42-9.  ^ Ooi Keat Gin (2009). Historical Dictionary of Malaysia. Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0-8108-6305-7.  ^ Hajek, John (June 1996). "Unraveling Lowland Semang". Oceanic Linguistics. 35 (1): 138–141. doi:10.2307/3623034. JSTOR 3623034.  ^ Fix, Alan G. (June 1995). "Malayan Paleosociology: Implications for Patterns of Genetic Variation among the Orang Asli". American Anthropologist. New Series. 97 (2): 313–323. doi:10.1525/aa.1995.97.2.02a00090. JSTOR 681964.  ^ Thonghom (2003). George Weber, ed. "36. The Negrito
Negrito
of Thailand: The Mani". The Andaman Association. Archived from the original on 20 May 2013. Retrieved 2017-11-23.  ^ C. Daryll Forde (2013). Habitat, Economy and Society: A Geographical Introduction to Ethnology. Routledge. ISBN 1-136-53465-2.  ^ Ivor H Evan (2012). Negritos of Malaya. Routledge. pp. 71–72. ISBN 11-362-6215-6.  ^ Wilfrid Dyson Hambly (1925). The History of Tattooing. Courier Corporation. ISBN 0-486-46812-7.  ^ Julian Haynes Steward (1972). Theory of Culture Change: The Methodology of Multilinear Evolution. University of Illinois Press. ISBN 0-252-00295-4.  ^ Alan Caillou (2000). Rampage. iUniverse. ISBN 0-595-09143-1.  ^ Terry Miller & Sean Williams, ed. (2011). The Garland Handbook of Southeast Asian Music. Routledge. ISBN 1-135-90154-6.  ^ Hugo Adolf Bernatzik & Jacques Ivanoff (2005). Moken and Semang: 1936-2004, Persistence and Change. White Lotus. ISBN 97-448-0082-8.  ^ Harry S. Ashmore (1961). Encyclopaedia Britannica: a new survey of universal knowledge, Volume 20. Encyclopaedia Britannica. p. 313.  ^ Joachim Schliesinger (2015). Ethnic Groups of Thailand: Non-Tai-Speaking Peoples. Booksmango. ISBN 1-63323-229-8.  ^ Robert W. Williamson (2010). The Mafulu Mountain People of British New Guinea. Lulu.com. ISBN 1-4092-2652-2.  ^ Scott Cunningham (2003). Divination for Beginners: Reading the Past, Present & Future. Llewellyn Publications. ISBN 0-7387-0384-2.  ^ Woodhouse, Leslie (Spring 2012). "Concubines with Cameras: Royal Siamese Consorts Picturing Femininity and Ethnic Difference in Early 20th Century Siam". Women's Camera Work: Asia. 2 (2). Retrieved 8 July 2015. 

Further reading[edit] Benjamin, Geoffrey. 2013. ‘Why have the Peninsular “Negritos” remained distinct?’ Human Biology 85: 445–484. [ISSN 0018-7143 (print), 1534-6617 (online)]

Bernatzik, H. A., & Ivanoff, J. (2005). Moken and Semang: 1936–2004, persistence and change. Bangkok: White Lotus. ISBN 974-480-082-8 Gomes, A. G. (1982). Ecological adaptation and population change: Semang
Semang
foragers and Temuan horticulturists in West Malaysia. Honolulu, Hawaii (1777 East-West Rd., Honolulu 96848): East-West Environment and Policy Institute. Human Relations Area Files, inc. (1976). Semang. [Ann Arbor, Mich: University Microfilms. Mirante, Edith (2014) "The Wind in the Bamboo: Journeys in Search of Asia's 'Negrito' Indigenous Peoples" Bangkok, Orchid Press. Rambo, A. T. (1985). Primitive polluters: Semang
Semang
impact on the Malaysian tropical rain forest ecosystem. Ann Arbor, Mich: Museum of Anthropology, University of Michigan. ISBN 0-915703-04-1

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Semang
Semang
people.

 "Semang". New International Encyclopedia. 1905. 

v t e

Negritos

Andaman Islands

Andamanese

Great Andamanese

Bale Bea Bo Jeru Juwoi Cari Kede Kol Kora Pucikwar

Jangil Jarawa Onge Sentinelese

Malaysia

Semang

Batek Jahai Kensiu Kintaq Lanoh Mendriq

Philippines

Aeta Ati Batak Mamanwa

Thailand

Maniq

Italics indicate extinct groups

v t e

Orang Asli
Orang Asli
of Malaysia

Semang Senoi Proto-Malay

Batek Jahai Kensiu Kintaq Lanoh Mendriq

Cheq Wong Jah Hut Mah Meri Semai Semaq Beri Temiar

Jakun Orang Kanaq Orang Laut

Orang Kuala Orang Seletar

Semelai Temoq Temuan

v t e

Ethnic groups in Malaysia
Malaysia
by region

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Peninsular Malaysia

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Orang Asli

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Orang Kuala Orang Seletar

Semelai Temoq Temuan

Semang

Batek Lanoh Jahai Kensiu Kintaq Mos

Senoi

Semai Mah Meri Cheq Wong Temiar Jah Hut Semaq Beri

Chinese

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Foreign ethnicities /expatriates

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