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The Info List - Sanford Stadium


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30,000 (1929–1948) 36,000 (1949–1963) 43,621 (1964–1966) 59,200 (1967–1980) 82,122 (1981–1990) 85,434 (1991–1993) 86,117 (1994–1999) 86,520 (2000–2002) 92,058 (2003) 92,746 (2004–2017) TBA (2018-future)

Surface Tifton 419 Bermuda Grass

Construction

Broke ground 1928

Opened October 12, 1929

Renovated 1994, 2018

Expanded 1949, 1964, 1967, 1981, 1991, 1994, 2000, 2003

Construction cost US$360,000 ($5.13 million in 2017 dollars[1])

Architect TC Atwood, Heely International (1967 expansion)[2]

Tenants

Georgia Bulldogs (NCAA) (1929–present) 1996 Summer Olympics
1996 Summer Olympics
– Football

Sanford Stadium
Stadium
is the on-campus playing venue for football at the University of Georgia
University of Georgia
in Athens, Georgia, United States. The 92,746-seat stadium is the tenth-largest stadium in the NCAA. Architecturally, the stadium is known for its numerous expansions over the years that have been carefully planned to fit with the existing "look" of the stadium. The view of Georgia's campus and rolling hills from the open west end-zone has led many to refer to Sanford Stadium as college football's "most beautiful on-campus stadium", while the surrounding pageantry has made it noteworthy as one of college football's "best, loudest, and most intimidating atmospheres". [3]. Games played there are said to be played "Between the Hedges" due to the field being surrounded by privet hedges, which have been a part of the design of the stadium since it opened in 1929. The current hedges were planted in 1996 after the originals were taken out to accommodate soccer for the 1996 Summer Olympics. The stadium is the 11th largest stadium in the United States and the 18th-largest such stadium in the world.

Contents

1 History 2 Stadium
Stadium
expansions 3 Notable Sanford Stadium
Stadium
games 4 1996 Summer Olympics 5 Features 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

History[edit] The stadium is named for Dr. Steadman Vincent Sanford, an early major force behind UGA athletics.[4] Sanford arrived at the University of Georgia as an English instructor in 1903. He later became the faculty representative to the athletics committee and would eventually become president of the University and Chancellor of the entire University System of Georgia. In 1911, he moved the university's football venue from its first location, Herty Field, to a location at the center of campus which was named Sanford Field in his honor.

Kickoff in 2007

In those early years of football, Georgia played a series of controversial games against in-state rival Georgia Tech. Sanford Field was too small to accommodate the large crowds, forcing Georgia to travel to Tech's Grant Field
Grant Field
in Atlanta
Atlanta
every year. Sanford wanted Georgia to have a venue that would equal Tech's, and the "final straw" came in 1927 when UGA's undefeated (9–0) team traveled to Tech and lost 12–0. It was alleged that Tech watered the field all night to slow UGA's running backs. Afterwards, Sanford vowed to "build a stadium bigger than Tech", and play the game at Athens every other year.[citation needed] To fund his vision, Sanford had an idea that members of the athletic association would sign notes guaranteeing a bank loan to fund the stadium construction. Those guarantors would be granted lifetime seats. The response was overwhelming, and in 1928 a loan of $150,000 supported by fans and alumni allowed construction to begin on a stadium whose total cost was $360,000.[citation needed] Near the existing Sanford Field was a low area between the Old Campus (to the north) and the Ag Campus (to the south) with a small creek (Tanyard Creek) running through it, creating a clearly preferable choice for the location of the new stadium. This natural valley containing Tanyard Creek would result in reduced costs, as stands could be built on the rising sides of the hill, while the creek could be enclosed in a concrete culvert, on top of which the field would be constructed. The architect for the stadium was TC Atwood of Chapel Hill, North Carolina, where North Carolina's Kenan Memorial Stadium had just been completed with a similar design. The 30,000-seat stadium was built in large part with convict labor, as were many public works projects of that era. While the location was, then as now, preferable for construction, the result is an uphill walk in any direction leaving the stadium.

Georgia fans "light up" Sanford Stadium
Stadium
with their cell phones at night during a game against Mississippi State in 2017.

The stadium was completed on time, and UGA convinced perennial powerhouse Yale, which has historically maintained close ties with UGA, to be their first opponent in the new stadium. (This also was Yale's first ever football game played in the South.) On October 12, 1929, a capacity crowd of over 30,000 paid $3 per ticket to watch the Bulldogs, under coach Harry Mehre, beat Yale 15–0 in Sanford Stadium's dedication game. The crowd was at the time the largest to witness a college football game in the South, and governors from all nine southern states also were in attendance.[5] Yale donated its half of the game receipts to UGA to help pay off the construction loans, which would subsequently be completely repaid in just five years. Dr. Sanford also was at this game, and attended many Georgia games at the stadium named in his honor until his death on September 15, 1945.

I have played in many stadiums, but to me there are only two special stadiums – Yankee Stadium
Stadium
in New York and Sanford Stadium
Stadium
in Athens, and there is no comparison between the two. There is no place in the world precisely like the grass that grows between the hedges in Athens, Georgia

Fran Tarkenton[6]

Sanford Stadium's hedges have encircled the field since the stadium's first game against Yale in 1929. The idea to put hedges around the field came from the Business Manager of the UGA Athletic Department, Charlie Martin. Martin claimed to have received inspiration for the idea during a visit to the Rose Bowl, where he saw the hedge of roses in that stadium. Roses were not a suitable choice for the climate in Athens, so privet hedges were used instead. Six other SEC stadiums have copied UGA and now have hedges, making this feature no longer unique to UGA, but Georgia has the only one that completely surrounds the playing field. There is a disagreement as to the exact type of hedge planted at Sanford Stadium. The UGA Media Guide claims that the hedge is an "English privet hedge".[7] A county extension agent in Athens, however, claims online that the hedge is composed of Chinese privet, Ligustrum sinense.[8] In addition to being a cosmetic touch, the hedges have proven to be an effective (though perhaps unintended) measure of crowd control. While not apparent in photos, the hedges are growing around a chain link fence which stops people who try to push through to the field. Even though a major traffic path to exit the stadium from both stands runs directly alongside the hedges, fans have only stormed the field and torn down the goalposts once in the entire history of Sanford Stadium.[citation needed] This occurred after the Georgia vs. Tennessee game on Oct. 7, 2000. Stadium
Stadium
expansions[edit]

Panoramic view from Sanford's upper North Deck during the October 14, 2006, home game against the Vanderbilt Commodores. The views of Georgia's campus from the open end-zone have led many to label Sanford as college football's most beautiful on-campus stadium

The original stadium consisted of the lower half of the current facility's grandstand seats. In 1940, field-level lights were added, and Georgia played its first night game against Kentucky to a 7–7 tie. The stadium's first major expansion took place in 1949, with the addition of 6,000 seats on the south side, bringing total capacity to 36,000. During the 1960s, many universities in the South were significantly expanding their stadiums, and Georgia was no different. Soon after the arrival of head coach Vince Dooley in 1964, UGA began updating Sanford Stadium, removing the field-level lighting (which obstructed views from the stands) and adding 7,621 temporary end-zone seats, which brought total capacity to 43,621. Architects Heery and Heery of Atlanta
Atlanta
were then hired to plan a major expansion. This expansion planning was very tricky, since by that time the stadium was closely enclosed on both north and south sides by academic buildings. The plans went forward, however, and an "upper deck" of seats was added to each side of the stadium in 1967 without the need to demolish or alter any of the surrounding buildings. In addition to the new upper decks, this first major addition included a new pressbox and club seating. In total, 19,640 seats were added to the stadium (bringing total capacity to 59,000), at a cost of $3 million. The new addition was christened with a victory over Mississippi State in 1967. In 1981, the east endzone stands were enclosed for a cost of $11.5 million, creating a "horseshoe-shaped" stadium and eliminating the free view enjoyed by the "Track People". This addition added 19,000 seats, bringing total stadium capacity to 82,122. The first game in the newly expanded stadium was on September 5, 1981, against Tennessee, with Georgia delivering a 44–0 drubbing. Lights were re-installed in the stadium in 1981. This time, the lights were not located at field level, but attached to the top of the upper level, thus not obscuring fans' views of the field. The first game under the "new lights" was a 13–7 victory against Clemson on September 6, 1982. In 1991, a portion of the west endzone stands was enclosed, creating a "partial bowl" around the lower level of Sanford Stadium. The west stands could not be completely enclosed due to the proximity of Gillis Bridge (usually called "Sanford Bridge"), a major campus transportation artery, to the stadium. This expansion cost $3.7 million and added 4,205 new seats, bringing total capacity to 85,434. 30 luxury suites were added above the south stands in 1994, and were expanded to 50 suites in 2000. These expansions cost a total of $18 million, and raised total capacity to 86,520. In 2003, another upper deck was added to the north side of the stadium. This added 5,500 new seats to the stadium at a cost of $25 million, bringing total stadium capacity to 92,058. Currently, most of these "upper-upper deck" seats are reserved for the fans of the visiting team. In 2005, installation of a new video display on the west end zone was completed. Ribbon boards were also added along the sides of the stadium. These additions, constructed and maintained by Daktronics, established Sanford Stadium
Stadium
as one of the most visually media intensive venues in the SEC. The stadium reached its current capacity of 92,746 in 2004, when 27 SkySuites were added to the north side of the stadium at a cost of $8 million.

The video board installed from 2005 underwent a $1.4 million overhaul before the 2011 season. The screen's size expanded from 25×46 feet to the full size of the scoreboard which is 52×76 feet. The new video board has full high definition (HD) capability.[9] On February 14, 2017, the UGA Athletic Board approved a $63 million expansion to renovate the west side of the stadium. The approved design will relocate the locker room, from the east side to the west side, as well as the addition of a new plaza and recruiting pavilion, which will add 500 seats to the stadium's capacity. Construction is set to begin during the 2017 season, take approximately 17 months, with an anticipated end date prior to the start of the 2018 season.[10] Notable Sanford Stadium
Stadium
games[edit]

October 12, 1929: In the first game played at Sanford Stadium, Georgia upset heavily favored Yale 15–0.[11] October 25, 1940: In the first game played under the lights, Georgia tied Kentucky 7-7. [12] November 14, 1959: A game winning touchdown in the final seconds from Fran Tarkenton
Fran Tarkenton
to Bill Heron led the Bulldogs to a 14-13 victory over rival Auburn, and the 1959 SEC Championship. [13] September 9, 1965: In the first game of Coach Vince Dooley's second season, Georgia beat Bear Bryant's defending national champions, the Alabama Crimson Tide, 18-17 on a fourth quarter 73 yard flea-flicker touchdown and ensuing two-point conversion. [14] September 22, 1984: Georgia beat rival, #2 Clemson, on a last-second 60 yard field goal from Kevin Butler. [15] October 7, 2000: The Bulldogs snapped a 9-game losing streak to the rival Tennessee Volunteers in a 21-10 victory. This marked the first and only time that fans have successfully rushed the field at Sanford Stadium. [16] November 10, 2007: In the first blackout game, the Bulldogs surprised the black-clad crowd by wearing black jerseys for the first time in school history. Georgia went on to defeat #20 Auburn, 45-20. [17]

1996 Summer Olympics[edit] The stadium played host to the Olympic medal competition of men's and women's Olympic football (soccer) at the 1996 Summer Olympics.[18][19] Because the required dimensions of a soccer field are wider than those of an American football
American football
field, the hedges surrounding the field had to be removed. This proved to be a controversial measure, as it had not been general public knowledge that the hedges would have to be removed to accommodate the Olympic football competition. In preparation for this necessity, cuttings were taken from the original hedges, three years prior to the Olympics, and cultivated at a secret, off-campus site. It was later discovered that this 'secret site' was 70 miles away at R.A. Dudley Nurseries in Thomson, Georgia. During the Olympics, Nigeria and the United States won the men's and women's football gold medals, respectively, at the hedge-less stadium. Once the Olympics were over, the newly grown hedges were transplanted from Dudley Nursery to the stadium. Sanford Stadium
Stadium
told the United States Soccer Federation it would not be interested in holding a possible World Cup match if the US gets the nod.[20] Features[edit]

Georgia's deceased Uga mascots are entombed in a mausoleum in the southwest corner of the stadium. Sanford Stadium
Stadium
is one of the few college stadiums, and one of only two in the Southeastern Conference, in which the football field is oriented to face east–west as opposed to north–south (the other is Commonwealth Stadium; both stadiums are oriented in a general northwest–southeast direction). Many of UGA's opponents have found it difficult for players to see as the west end zone is still open and the sun shines in the faces of the players, although both teams face the sun during the game. Until the end of the era of rail travel, executives of the Central of Georgia Railway Co. would park the company president's luxury office rail car on the tracks overlooking the stadium's open west end zone for an excellent view of the spectacle. With food served on china by white-coated porters to the Central of Georgia executives and their guests, the rail car "Atlanta" could be considered Sanford Stadium's original luxury skybox. In the 1970s, a multitude of fans began watching Georgia games from the railroad tracks that overlooked the stadium's open east end zone. These "Track People", as they came to be known, were able to watch the game for free, and became a tradition. The 1981 expansion of the stadium, however, enclosed the east end zone stands, eliminating the view of the field from the railroad tracks and effectively ending the "Track People" tradition. Georgia's fans have only rushed the field and torn down the goal posts once in the stadium's history. This happened on October 7, 2000, after the Bulldogs beat rival Tennessee for the first time since 1988. This statistic is usually credited to the fact that the hedges serve not only cosmetic purposes, but also help with crowd control. Aiding this cause is that the hedges surround, and largely conceal, a low chain-link fence running through their branches around the circumference of the field. Through the 1994 season, the field only had the basic markings required for play. There weren't any logos at midfield or writing in the end zone, as had become commonplace in many stadiums.

See also[edit]

Georgia Bulldogs football List of NCAA Division I
NCAA Division I
FBS football stadiums

References[edit]

^ Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis Community Development Project. "Consumer Price Index (estimate) 1800–". Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis. Retrieved January 2, 2018.  ^ "Sanford Stadium
Stadium
– StadiumDB.com". stadiumdb.com.  ^ "Top 20 College football
College football
stadiums you must see in your lifetime". SI.com.  ^ Steadman Vincent Sanford ^ Lukacs, John D. "A journey back "between the hedges"". ESPN. Retrieved October 12, 2009.  ^ Sharpe, Wilton (2005). "Chapter 11". Bulldog Madness: Great Eras in Georgia Football. Nashville, Tennessee: Cumberland House. p. 209. ISBN 1-58182-447-5.  ^ http://www.georgiadogs.com/attachments1/1407.pdf[permanent dead link] ^ Henning, Frank (October 3, 2003). "Between the Hedges and Beyond". Athens Banner-Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2011.  ^ Weiszer, Marc (February 25, 2011). "UGA-Florida ticket hike delayed". Athens Banner-Herald. Retrieved February 25, 2011.  ^ "Georgia approves $63 million renovation to Sanford Stadium". Athens Banner-Herald. February 14, 2017. Retrieved February 15, 2017.  ^ "All-Americans" (PDF). p. 177.  ^ http://georgiadogs.com/sports/2017/6/17/sanford-stadium-gameday.aspx.  Missing or empty title= (help) ^ http://www.al.com/auburnfootball/index.ssf/2013/11/taking_a_look_back_the_top_10.html.  Missing or empty title= (help) ^ http://www.macon.com/sports/spt-columns-blogs/bobby-pope/article36842628.html.  Missing or empty title= (help) ^ http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1118647-georgia-football-5-most-memorable-games-at-sanford-stadium.  Missing or empty title= (help) ^ http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1118647-georgia-football-5-most-memorable-games-at-sanford-stadium.  Missing or empty title= (help) ^ http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1118647-georgia-football-5-most-memorable-games-at-sanford-stadium.  Missing or empty title= (help) ^ 1996 Summer Olympics
1996 Summer Olympics
official report. Volume 1. p. 543. ^ 1996 Summer Olympics
1996 Summer Olympics
official report. Volume 3. p. 455. ^ Federation, United States Soccer (April 23, 2009). "The Official Site of U.S. Soccer – Federation Services". Archived from the original on April 26, 2009. Retrieved May 9, 2009. 

External links[edit]

Official website

Events and tenants

Preceded by Camp Nou Barcelona Summer Olympics Football Men's Finals (Sanford Stadium) 1996 Succeeded by Sydney
Sydney
Olympic Stadium Sydney

v t e

Georgia Bulldogs football

Venues

Herty Field
Herty Field
(1892–1910) Sanford Field (1911–1928) Sanford Stadium
Stadium
(1929–present)

Bowls & rivalries

Bowl games Auburn: Deep South's Oldest Rivalry Clemson Florida Georgia Tech: Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate South Carolina Tennessee Vanderbilt

Culture & lore

History Hairy Dawg Uga "Glory, Glory" Georgia Redcoat Marching Band First forward pass 1927 Yale game

People

Head coaches Steadman V. Sanford Larry Munson Morgan Blake NFL draftees Starting quarterbacks Statistical leaders

Seasons

1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899 1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909 1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919 1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929 1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939 1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989 1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

National championship seasons in bold

Links to related articles

v t e

University of Georgia

Located in: Athens, Georgia

Academics

College of Agricultural and Environmental Sciences Franklin College of Arts and Sciences Terry College of Business Odum School of Ecology College of Education College of Engineering Environment & Design Family and Consumer Sciences Warnell School of Forestry and Natural Resources Graduate School Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication School of Law College of Pharmacy College of Public Health School of Public and International Affairs School of Social Work College of Veterinary Medicine Skidaway Institute of Oceanography

Athletics

Championship teams Uga Hairy Dawg Football Basketball

Men's Women's

Baseball Equestrian Women's Gymnastics Swimming and Diving Track & Field

Men's Women's

Clean, Old-Fashioned Hate Deep South's Oldest Rivalry Florida–Georgia football rivalry Southeastern Conference Sanford Stadium Stegeman Coliseum Gabrielsen Natatorium Foley Field Turner Soccer Complex Glory, Glory

People, history, and campus life

Alumni and Faculty Greek life Campus Arboretum Georgia Redcoat Marching Band Demosthenian Literary Society Phi Kappa Literary Society UGA Campus Transit Presidents

Media

The Georgia Review The Red and Black University of Georgia
University of Georgia
Press WUOG WUGA

Founded: 1785 Students: 36,130 Endowment: 1.004 billion

v t e

Football stadiums of the Southeastern Conference

Eastern Division

Ben Hill Griffin Stadium
Stadium
(Florida) Sanford Stadium
Stadium
(Georgia) Kroger Field
Kroger Field
(Kentucky) Faurot Field
Faurot Field
(Missouri) Williams-Brice Stadium
Stadium
(South Carolina) Neyland Stadium
Stadium
(Tennessee) Vanderbilt Stadium
Stadium
(Vanderbilt) TIAA Bank Field
TIAA Bank Field
(Florida vs. Georgia)

Western Division

Bryant–Denny Stadium
Stadium
(Alabama) Donald W. Reynolds Razorback Stadium
Stadium
(Arkansas) Little Rock War Memorial Stadium
Stadium
(Arkansas, alternate) Jordan–Hare Stadium
Stadium
(Auburn) Tiger Stadium
Stadium
(LSU) Davis Wade Stadium
Stadium
(Mississippi State) Vaught–Hemingway Stadium
Stadium
(Ole Miss) Kyle Field
Kyle Field
(Texas A&M) AT&T Stadium
Stadium
(Arkansas vs. Texas A&M)

SEC Championship Game

Mercedes-Benz Stadium
Stadium
(2017–present) Georgia Dome
Georgia Dome
(1994–2016) Legion Field
Legion Field
(1992–1993)

v t e

College football
College football
venues in Georgia

Division I FBS

ACC

Bobby Dodd Stadium
Stadium
(Georgia Tech)

SEC

Sanford Stadium
Stadium
(Georgia)

Sun Belt

Paulson Stadium
Stadium
(Georgia Southern) Georgia State Stadium
Stadium
(Georgia State)

Division I FCS

Big South

Fifth Third Bank Stadium
Stadium
(Kennesaw State)

MEAC

Ted Wright Stadium
Stadium
(Savannah State)

SoCon

Moye Complex
Moye Complex
(Mercer)

Division II

Gulf South

Barron Stadium
Stadium
(Shorter) Bazemore–Hyder Stadium
Stadium
(Valdosta State) University Stadium
Stadium
(West Georgia)

SIAC

Albany State University Coliseum
Albany State University Coliseum
(Albany State) Panther Stadium
Stadium
(Clark Atlanta) Wildcat Stadium
Stadium
(Fort Valley State) B. T. Harvey Stadium
Stadium
(Morehouse)

Division III

SAA

Valhalla (Berry)

USA South

Callaway Stadium
Stadium
(LaGrange)

NAIA

Mid-South

Ken White Field (Reinhardt)

A. J. McClung Memorial Stadium Memorial Stadium Mercedes-Benz Stadium

v t e

Venues of the 1996 Summer Olympics

Olympic Ring

Alexander Memorial Coliseum Atlanta–Fulton County Stadium Clark Atlanta
Atlanta
University Stadium Cycling road course Georgia Dome Georgia State University Gymnasium Georgia Tech Aquatic Center Georgia World Congress Center Marathon course Morehouse College
Morehouse College
Gymnasium Morris Brown College Stadium Centennial Olympic Stadium Omni Coliseum Walking course

Metro Atlanta

Atlanta
Atlanta
Beach Georgia International Horse Park Lake Lanier Stone Mountain
Stone Mountain
Park Archery Center and Velodrome Stone Mountain
Stone Mountain
Tennis Center Wolf Creek Shooting Complex

Other venues

Florida Citrus Bowl (Orlando, Florida) Golden Park
Golden Park
(Columbus, Georgia) Legion Field
Legion Field
(Birmingham, Alabama) Ocoee Whitewater Center
Ocoee Whitewater Center
(Polk County, Tennessee) Orange Bowl (Miami, Florida) RFK Memorial Stadium
Stadium
(Washington, D.C.) Sanford Stadium
Stadium
(Athens, Georgia) University of Georgia
University of Georgia
Coliseum (Athens, Georgia) Wassaw Sound
Wassaw Sound
(Savannah, Georgia)

v t e

Olympic venues in association football

1900 Vélodrome de Vincennes 1904 Francis Field 1908 White City Stadium 1912 Råsunda IP, Stockholm Olympic Stadium
Stadium
(final), Tranebergs Idrottsplats 1920 Jules Ottenstadion, Olympisch Stadion (final), Stade Joseph Marien, Stadion Broodstraat 1924 Stade Bergeyre, Stade de Colombes (final), Stade de Paris, Stade Pershing 1928 Monnikenhuize, Olympic Stadium
Stadium
(final), Sparta Stadion Het Kasteel 1936 Hertha-BSC Field, Mommsenstadion, Olympiastadion (final), Poststadion 1948 Arsenal Stadium, Champion Hill, Craven Cottage, Empire Stadium
Stadium
(medal matches), Fratton Park, Goldstone Ground, Green Pond Road, Griffin Park, Lynn Road, Selhurst Park, White Hart Lane 1952 Helsinki Football Grounds, Kotka, Lahti, Olympic Stadium
Stadium
(final), Tampere, Turku 1956 Melbourne Cricket Ground
Melbourne Cricket Ground
(final), Olympic Park Stadium 1960 Florence Communal Stadium, Grosseto Communal Stadium, L'Aquila Communal Stadium, Livorno Ardenza Stadium, Naples Saint Paul's Stadium, Pescara Adriatic Stadium, Stadio Flaminio
Stadio Flaminio
(final) 1964 Komazawa Olympic Park Stadium, Mitsuzawa Football Field, Nagai Stadium, Tokyo National Stadium
Stadium
(final), Nishikyogoku Athletic Stadium, Ōmiya Football Field, Prince Chichibu Memorial Football Field 1968 Estadio Azteca
Estadio Azteca
(final), Estadio Cuauhtémoc, Estadio Nou Camp, Jalisco Stadium 1972 Dreiflüssestadion, ESV-Stadion, Jahnstadion, Olympiastadion (final), Rosenaustadion, Urban Stadium 1976 Lansdowne Park, Olympic Stadium
Stadium
(final), Sherbrooke Stadium, Varsity Stadium 1980 Dinamo Stadium, Dynamo Central Stadium, Grand Arena, Grand Arena (final), Kirov Stadium, Republican Stadium 1984 Harvard Stadium, Navy–Marine Corps Memorial Stadium, Rose Bowl (final), Stanford Stadium 1988 Busan Stadium, Daegu Stadium, Daejeon Stadium, Dongdaemun Stadium, Olympic Stadium
Stadium
(final) 1992 Estadi de la Nova Creu Alta, Camp Nou
Camp Nou
(final), Estadio Luís Casanova, La Romareda, Sarrià Stadium 1996 Florida Citrus Bowl, Legion Field, Orange Bowl, RFK Memorial Stadium, Sanford Stadium
Stadium
(both finals) 2000 Stadium
Stadium
Australia, Brisbane Cricket Ground, Bruce Stadium, Hindmarsh Stadium, Melbourne Cricket Ground, Olympic Stadium
Stadium
(men's final), Sydney
Sydney
Football Stadium
Stadium
(women's final) 2004 Kaftanzoglio Stadium, Karaiskakis Stadium
Stadium
(women's final), Olympic Stadium
Stadium
(men's final), Pampeloponnisiako Stadium, Pankritio Stadium, Panthessaliko Stadium 2008 Beijing National Stadium
Stadium
(men's final), Qinhuangdao Olympic Sports Center Stadium, Shanghai Stadium, Shenyang Olympic Sports Center Stadium, Tianjin Olympic Center Stadium, Workers' Stadium
Stadium
(women's final) 2012 City of Coventry Stadium, Hampden Park, Millennium Stadium, St James' Park, Old Trafford, Wembley Stadium
Stadium
(both finals) 2016 Estádio Nacional de Brasília, Arena Fonte Nova, Mineirão, Arena Corinthians, Arena da Amazônia, Estádio Olímpico João Havelange, Maracanã (both finals) 2020 International Stadium
Stadium
Yokohama, Kashima Soccer Stadium, Miyagi Stadium, National Stadium, Saitama Stadium, Sapporo Dome, Tokyo Stadium 2024 Parc des Princes
Parc des Princes
(both finals), Parc Olympique Lyonnais, Stade de la Beaujoire, Stade de Nice, Stade Geoffroy-Guichard, Stade Matmut Atlantique, Stadium
Stadium
Municipal, Stade Pierre-Mauroy, Stade Vélodrome 2028 Los Angeles Stadium
Stadium
at Hollywood Park, Banc of California Stadium, Rose Bowl, Levi's Stadium, Avaya Stadium, Stanford Stadium, California Memo

.