Rutland (town), Vermont
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Rutland is a town in Rutland County, Vermont, in the
United States The United States of America (U.S.A. or USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US) or America, is a country Continental United States, primarily located in North America. It consists of 50 U.S. state, states, a Washington, D.C., ...

United States
. As of the 2020 census, the population was 3,924. The Town of Rutland completely surrounds the City of
Rutland Rutland () is a Counties of England, county in the East Midlands of England, bounded to the west and north by Leicestershire, to the northeast by Lincolnshire and the southeast by Northamptonshire. Its greatest length north to south is on ...
, which is incorporated separately from the town. The villages of the town effectively comprise the inner suburbs of the City of Rutland.


History

The town was originally granted in 1761 by Governor
Benning Wentworth Benning Wentworth (24 July 1696 – 14 October 1770) was the colonial governor of New Hampshire New Hampshire ( ) is a U.S. state, state in the New England region of the United States. It is bordered by Massachusetts to the south, Vermont t ...
as one of the
New Hampshire Grants The New Hampshire Grants or Benning Wentworth Grants were land grant A land grant is a gift of real estate Real estate is property consisting of land and the buildings on it, along with its natural resource , Malaysia Malaysia ( ...
. He named it after
John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland John Manners, 3rd Duke of Rutland KG PC (21 October 1696 – 29 May 1779) was an English nobleman, the eldest son of John Manners, 2nd Duke of Rutland John Manners, 2nd Duke of Rutland KG (18 September 1676 – 22 February 1721), styled L ...
. It is also recorded that
John MurrayJohn Murray or John Murry may refer to: Arts and media Literature and music *John Murray (publishing house), a British publishing house, founded by John Murray (1745–1793) *John Murray (publisher, born 1778) (died 1843), second head of the pub ...
who was the first named proprietor and from
Rutland Rutland () is a Counties of England, county in the East Midlands of England, bounded to the west and north by Leicestershire, to the northeast by Lincolnshire and the southeast by Northamptonshire. Its greatest length north to south is on ...
named it. It was one of the most successful of those grants because of the excellent farmland and gentle topography. In the early 19th century, small high-quality
marble Marble is a metamorphic rock , a type of metamorphic rock Metamorphic rocks arise from the transformation of existing rock (geology), rock to new types of rock, in a process called metamorphism upright=1.35, Schematic representation of ...

marble
deposits were discovered in Rutland, and in the 1830s a large deposit of nearly solid marble of high quality was found in what is now West Rutland. By the 1840s small firms had begun operations, but marble
quarries A quarry is a type of open-pit mine File:Ende Gelände 2017 CHB 23 (cropped).jpg, The giant bucket-wheel excavators in the German Rhineland coal mines are among the world's biggest land vehicles. Open-pit mining, also known as open-cas ...

quarries
only became profitable when the railroad came to Rutland in 1851. As fate would have it, the famous quarries of
Carrara Carrara ( , ; ) is a city and ''comune'' in Tuscany, in central Italy, of the province of Massa and Carrara, and notable for the white or blue-grey marble quarried there. It is on the Carrione River, some Boxing the compass, west-northwest of ...

Carrara
in
Tuscany it, Toscano (man) it, Toscana (woman) , population_note = , population_blank1_title = , population_blank1 = , demographics_type1 = Citizenship , demographics1_footnotes = , demographics1_title1 = Italian , demogra ...
,
Italy Italy ( it, Italia ), officially the Italian Republic ( it, Repubblica Italiana, links=no ), is a country consisting of a peninsula delimited by the Alps The Alps ; german: Alpen ; it, Alpi ; rm, Alps; sl, Alpe ) are the highest ...

Italy
, became largely unworkable because of their extreme depth at the same time, and Rutland quickly became one of the leading producers of marble in the world. This fueled enough growth and investment that in 1886 the marble companies saw to it that the present Rutland City was incorporated as a village, and most of the town was split off as West Rutland and
Proctor Proctor (a variant of ''procurator Procurator (with procuracy or procuratorate referring to the office itself) may refer to: * Procurator, one engaged in procuration, the action of taking care of, hence management, stewardship, agency * ''Pr ...
, which between them contained the bulk of the marble quarries. Proctor was named for and almost completely owned by
Senator A senate is a deliberative assembly, often the upper house or Debating chamber, chamber of a bicameral legislature. The name comes from the Ancient Rome, ancient Roman Senate (Latin: ''Senatus''), so-called as an assembly of the senior (Lat ...
Redfield Proctor Redfield Proctor (June 1, 1831March 4, 1908) was a U.S. politician of the United States Republican Party, Republican Party. He served as the List of Governors of Vermont, 37th governor of Vermont from 1878 to 1880, as United States Secretary of ...
. In 1892 Rutland City was incorporated, and the remaining town of Rutland that encircled it was primarily rural.


Geography

Rutland is located at , elevation 164.6 m (540 ft). According to the
United States Census Bureau The United States Census Bureau (USCB), officially the Bureau of the Census, is a principal agency of the U.S. Federal Statistical System, responsible for producing data about the American American(s) may refer to: * American, something of, ...
, the town has a total area of , of which is land and is water. Rutland is drained by Otter Creek, Moon Brook, Tenney Brook, East Creek and Mussey Brook. The town is crossed by U.S. Route 4, U.S. Route 7 and Vermont Route 4A. The town of Rutland is home to the Diamond Run Mall and
Castleton University Castleton University is a public university in Castleton, Vermont. It has an enrollment of 2000 students and offers more than 30 undergraduate programs, as well as master's degrees in education and accounting. It is accredited by the New England ...
's Spartan Arena.


Demographics

As of the
census A census is the procedure of systematically calculating, acquiring and recording information Information is processed, organised and structured data Data (; ) are individual facts, statistics, or items of information, often numeric. In ...

census
of 2010, there were 4,054 people, 1,691 households, and 1,166 families residing in the town. The
population density Population density (in agriculture Agriculture is the science, art and practice of cultivating plants and livestock. Agriculture was the key development in the rise of sedentary Image:Family watching television 1958.jpg, Exercise tr ...

population density
was 209.7 people per square mile (81.0/km2). There were 1,761 housing units at an average density of 91.5 per square mile (35.3/km2). There were 1,691 households, out of which 28.6% had children under the age of 18 living with them, 58.1% were
married couples Marriage, also called matrimony or wedlock is a culturally and often legally recognized union between people called spouse A spouse is a significant other in a marriage (in certain contexts, it can also apply to a civil union or comm ...

married couples
living together, 8.9% had a female householder with no husband present, and 31.0% were non-families. 26.6% of all households were made up of individuals, and 13.5% had someone living alone who was 65 years of age or older. The average household size was 2.35 and the average family size was 2.85. In the town, the population was spread out, with 22.1% under the age of 18, 4.3% from 18 to 24, 22.9% from 25 to 44, 32.0% from 45 to 64, and 18.8% who were 65 years of age or older. The median age was 45 years. For every 100 females, there were 89.4 males. For every 100 females age 18 and over, there were 84.4 males. The
median income The median income is the income In microeconomics, income is the Consumption (economics), consumption and saving opportunity gained by an entity within a specified timeframe, which is generally expressed in monetary terms.Smith's financial dict ...
for a household in the town was $44,420, and the median income for a family was $55,134. Males had a median income of $37,005 versus $25,053 for females. The
per capita income Per capita income (PCI) or total income measures the average income earned per person in a given area (city, region, country, etc.) in a specified year. It is calculated by dividing the area's total income by its total population. Per capita i ...
for the town was $24,400. About 4.9% of families and 6.4% of the population were below the
poverty line The poverty threshold, poverty limit, poverty line or breadline is the minimum level of income In microeconomics, income is the Consumption (economics), consumption and saving opportunity gained by an entity within a specified timeframe, w ...
, including 8.8% of those under the age of 18 and 7.7% of those ages 65 or older.


Notable people

* Benjamin Alvord, Civil War general, mathematician, and botanist *
Horace Henry Baxter Horace Henry Baxter (January 8, 1818 – February 17, 1884) was a Vermont Vermont () is a U.S. state, state in the New England region of the United States. It borders the states of Massachusetts to the south, New Hampshire to the east, and Ne ...

Horace Henry Baxter
, businessman and Adjutant General of the Vermont Militia during the
American Civil War The American Civil War (also known by other names Other most often refers to: * Other (philosophy), a concept in psychology and philosophy Other or The Other may also refer to: Books * The Other (Tryon novel), ''The Other'' (Tryon nove ...
*
John Deere John Deere () is the brand name of Deere & Company, an American corporation that manufactures agricultural machinery, heavy equipment, forestry machinery, diesel engines, drivetrains (axles, transmissions, gearboxes) used in heavy equipment, and ...
, blacksmith and industrialist who founded
Deere & Company John Deere () is the brand name of Deere & Company, an American corporation that manufactures agricultural machinery, heavy equipment, forestry machinery, diesel engines, drivetrains (axles, transmissions, gearboxes) used in heavy equipment, and ...
*
Julia Caroline Dorr Julia Caroline Ripley Dorr (February 13, 1825 – January 18, 1913) was an American author who published both prose and poetry. Although she wrote a number of novels and works on travel, she was best known for her poetry. Her work was conservative; ...
, author of prose and poetry * Merritt A. Edson, general in the
United States Marine Corps The United States Marine Corps (USMC), also referred to as the United States Marines, is the maritime land force service branch Military branch (also service branch or armed service) is according to common standard the subdivision of the na ...
* Russell de Gree Flagg, luthier * Walter E. Flanders, industrialist *
Martin Henry Freeman Martin Henry Freeman (1826–1889) was the first black people, Black president of an American college. He also later served as president of Liberia College. Biography Freeman was born in Rutland (town), Vermont, Rutland, Vermont in 1826. After r ...

Martin Henry Freeman
, first black president of a US college *
William Henry Jackson William Henry Jackson (April 4, 1843 – June 30, 1942) was an American photographer, American Civil War, Civil War veteran, painter, and an explorer famous for his images of the American West. He was a great-great nephew of Samuel Wilson, t ...
, painter, photographer and explorer *
Carlene King JohnsonCarlene King Johnson Drake (May 31, 1933 – April 15, 1969) was Miss USA 1955. She attended Middlebury College, where she was a member of the Nu chapter Sigma Kappa sorority.Sigma Kappa Triangle Magazine, Fall 1955, pg. 4, George Banta Publishi ...
, Miss Vermont USA 1955, Miss USA 1955 *
Aaron Lewis Aaron Lewis (born April 13, 1972) is an American singer, songwriter A songwriter is a musician A musician is a person who Composer, composes, Conducting, conducts, or Performing arts, performs music. According to the United States Employ ...
, vocalist and guitarist of Nu Metal/rock group
Staind Staind ( ) is an American rock Rock most often refers to: * Rock (geology) A rock is any naturally occurring solid mass or aggregate of minerals or mineraloid matter. It is categorized by the minerals included, its Chemical compound, c ...

Staind
and solo musician * William Marks, early figure in the
Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints The Community of Christ, known from 1872 to 2001 as the Reorganized Church of Jesus Christ of Latter Day Saints (RLDS), is an American-based international church, and is the second-largest denomination in the Latter Day Saint movement The ...
*
James McNeil James McNeil (b. July 24, 1958) is an American businessman and politician who served as a member of the Vermont House of Representatives from 2008 to 2013 and the Vermont Senate from 2019 to 2021. Early life and education James L. McNeil was born ...
, member of the
Vermont House of Representatives The Vermont House of Representatives is the lower house A lower house is one of two chambers Chambers may refer to: Places Canada: *Chambers Township, Ontario United States: *Chambers County, Alabama *Chambers, Arizona, an unincorporated co ...

Vermont House of Representatives
and
Vermont Senate The Vermont Senate is the upper house of the Vermont General Assembly, the State legislature (United States), state legislature of the U.S. state of Vermont. The senate consists of 30 members. Vermont Senate districts, 2002-2012, Senate districti ...

Vermont Senate
*
James Meacham
James Meacham
, US congressman * Zerah Mead, member of the Wisconsin State Assembly * Kevin J. Mullin, member of the
Vermont House of Representatives The Vermont House of Representatives is the lower house A lower house is one of two chambers Chambers may refer to: Places Canada: *Chambers Township, Ontario United States: *Chambers County, Alabama *Chambers, Arizona, an unincorporated co ...

Vermont House of Representatives
and
Vermont Senate The Vermont Senate is the upper house of the Vermont General Assembly, the State legislature (United States), state legislature of the U.S. state of Vermont. The senate consists of 30 members. Vermont Senate districts, 2002-2012, Senate districti ...

Vermont Senate
* Cephas Washburn, Christian missionary and educator


See also

* ''
Rutland Herald The ''Rutland Herald'' is the second largest daily newspaper in the U.S. The United States of America (USA), commonly known as the United States (U.S. or US), or America, is a country primarily located in North America North ...
'' *
Rutland Railway The Rutland Railroad was a railroad in the Northeast United States, northeastern United States, located primarily in the state of Vermont but extending into the state of New York (state), New York at both its northernmost and southernmost ends ...


References


External links


Town of Rutland official website

Rutland Historical Society & Museum

Rutland Free Library

Vermont State Fair




{{DEFAULTSORT:Rutland (Town), Vermont Towns in Vermont Rutland Town Towns in Rutland County, Vermont