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Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
(May 2, 1922[2] – April 11, 2007) was an American actor and director known for his rich voice and dignified bearing. He resisted playing stereotypically black roles, instead performing in several productions with New York City's Shakespeare Festival Theater, Leland Hayward’s satirical NBC
NBC
series That Was the Week That Was, and a poetry performance tour of the United States in addition to his work in television and film. In 1976, Browne was nominated for an Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Single Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Series for his work on ABC's Barney Miller. In 1986, he won the Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Performer in a Comedy Series for his work on NBC's The Cosby
Cosby
Show.[3] In 1992, he received a Tony Award
Tony Award
nomination for Best Featured Actor in a Play for his performance as "Holloway" in August Wilson's Two Trains Running.[4][5] In 1995, he received a Daytime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
nomination for Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program for his performance as "The Kingpin" in Spider-Man. Browne was inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame in 1977[6] and posthumously inducted into the American Theater Hall of Fame in 2008.[7]

Contents

1 Early life and education 2 Career

2.1 Acting 2.2 Directing

3 Birth year 4 Death 5 Awards and recognition 6 Filmography

6.1 Film 6.2 Voice 6.3 Television

7 Theatre 8 Other work

8.1 Recordings 8.2 Radio Appearances 8.3 Writings

9 References 10 External links

Early life and education[edit] Born in Woodbury, New Jersey, Browne was the fourth son of Baptist minister Sylvanus S. Browne and his wife Lovie (née Lovie Lee Usher). He attended historically black Lincoln University in Pennsylvania. While there, he became a member of the Omega Psi Phi
Omega Psi Phi
fraternity and graduated with a bachelor's degree in 1946. During World War II, he served in Italy with the United States Army's 92nd Infantry Division and organised the Division's track and field team.[8] After the war, he undertook postgraduate work at Middlebury College, Columbia University, and the University of Florence. A middle-distance runner, he won two Amateur Athletic Union
Amateur Athletic Union
1,000-yard national indoor championships.[9] He occasionally returned to Lincoln University between 1946-52 to teach English, French, and comparative literature. Upon leaving academia, he earned a living for several years selling wine for Schenley Import Corporation. In 1956, he left his job with Schenley to become a full-time professional actor.[citation needed] Career[edit] Acting[edit] Despite the apprehensions of his friends, Browne managed to land the roles of soothsayer and Pindarus in Julius Caesar, directed by Joseph Papp for New York City's first Shakespeare Festival Theater. More work with the Shakespeare Festival Theater followed,[10] and he voiced an offscreen part as camera operator J.J. Burden in The Connection (1961), his first movie role was in Hitchcock's Topaz
Topaz
(1969) as Phillipe Dubois, a French-Haitian spy with a substantial role, his second movie role.[11] In The Cowboys
The Cowboys
(1972) in a role as a camp cook, he led a group of young cowhands avenging the death of John Wayne's character in the movie. Browne was much in demand for narration and voice-over parts in film and on commercial sound recordings. In 1968-69, he was heard as a late-night disc jockey on WNEW-FM[12] in New York reciting poetry and passages from the Bible
Bible
and assorted literary works. In 1977, Browne narrated a record album, The Story of Star Wars, which presented an abridged version of the events depicted in the first released film utilizing the dialogue and sound effects. The recording was produced by George Lucas
George Lucas
and Alan Livingston.[13][14][15][16][17] Browne was determined not to accept stereotypical roles which had routinely been offered to African-American
African-American
actors. He also wanted to do more than act and narrate. In 1966, he wrote and made his directorial stage debut with A Hand Is On The Gate, starring Cicely Tyson, James Earl Jones, and Moses Gunn. A lifelong bachelor who coveted his privacy in the turbulent decades of the civil rights revolution, Browne avoided participation in public protests, preferring instead to be “more effective on stage with metaphor...than in the streets with an editorial”.[18] His stage success brought him to the attention of producer Leland Hayward, and in 1964 he began a regular stint as a cast member on Hayward's satirical NBC-TV series That Was the Week That Was. Starting in the late 1960s, Browne increasingly became a guest star on TV on both comedy and dramatic shows like Mannix, All in the Family, Good Times, Sanford and Son, The Cosby
Cosby
Show, A Different World
A Different World
and dozens of other shows. He also was a regular on Soap[11] where he played Saunders, the erudite butler from 1979–81. Browne later guest-starred on Benson with Robert Guillaume, who had himself previously been in the cast of Soap. Browne's appearances on The Cosby Show won him an Emmy Award
Emmy Award
in 1986 for his guest role as Professor Foster. He and fellow actor Anthony Zerbe
Anthony Zerbe
toured the United States with their poetry performance piece Behind the Broken Words, which included readings of poetry, some of it written by Browne, as well as performances of comedy and dramatic works.[10] Browne found additional success performing in the plays of August Wilson, both on Broadway and the Pittsburgh Public Theater. He was described as having "a baritone voice like a sable coat", speaking the King's English with a strong mid-Atlantic accent. To someone who once said Browne sounded "too white", he replied, "I'm sorry, I once had a white maid."[19] Four years before his death, Browne narrated a series of WPA slave narratives in the HBO
HBO
film, Unchained Memories (2003).[20] Directing[edit] Browne's directorial credits include a piece called An Evening of Negro
Negro
Poetry and Folk Music
Folk Music
at the Delacorte Theatre
Delacorte Theatre
and the Public Theatre in New York City
New York City
in 1966. It was also produced as A Hand Is on the Gate at the Longacre Theatre
Longacre Theatre
in New York City
New York City
in 1966. The production was also revived at the Afro-American Studio in New York City from 1976 to 1977.[21] Birth year[edit] Some year-of-birth records, including the Social Security Death Index,[1] report Browne born on May 2, 1922, while other sources claim that Browne's date of birth was three years later, on May 2, 1925. Those sources include The New York Times,[22] Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Times,[23] Variety,[24] the Associated Press[25] and several others,[26][27][28] including a Congressional Resolution.[29] In an undated videotaped interview with Camille O. Cosby
Camille O. Cosby
for the National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP), Browne said: "I was born, Camille, so they say, May 2, 1922, in Woodbury, New Jersey."[30] Death[edit] Browne died of stomach cancer in Los Angeles
Los Angeles
on April 11, 2007, aged 84. He never married and had no children.[11][31][32][33] He was remembered for his contributions in a New York Times
New York Times
encomium by Frank Crohn of the Edna St. Vincent Millay
Edna St. Vincent Millay
Society:

We mourn the loss of our long-time Trustee and faithful friend. He was always to be counted upon to be supportive of the aims and purposes of the Society. He filled our lives with the soft sound of poetry as only he could recite it. Now the stage is empty and the lights are low.[11]

Awards and recognition[edit]

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Drama Critics Circle Award – Best Actor Award, for his performance as "Makak" in Derek Walcott's The Dream on Monkey Mountain, 1970[34] Bronze Wrangler, the Western Heritage Award
Western Heritage Award
- a shared award with the production, for Theatrical Motion Picture, for "The Cowboys," a Warner Brothers film, 1972[35] Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
nomination - Outstanding Single Performance by a Supporting Actor in a Comedy or Drama Series, for ABC's Barney Miller, 1976[3] Inducted into the Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame, 1977[36] Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
- Outstanding Guest Performer in a Comedy Series, for NBC's The Cosby
Cosby
Show, 1986[3] NAACP Image Award - Outstanding Actor in a Comedy Series, for The Cosby
Cosby
Show, 1986

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Drama Critics Circle Award – Best Actor Award, for his performance as "Bynum Walker" in August Wilson's Joe Turner's Come and Gone, 1989[37] Soap Opera Digest Award nomination - Outstanding Villain: Prime Time, for Falcon Crest, 1989 Tony Award
Tony Award
nomination - Best Featured Actor in a Play, for his performance as "Holloway" in August Wilson's Two Trains Running, directed by Lloyd Richards, 1992[38][39] Helen Hayes Award - Outstanding Supporting Performer, Non-Resident Production, for Two Trains Running, 1992[40] Daytime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
nomination - Outstanding Performer in an Animated Program, for his performance as "The Kingpin" in Spider-Man, 1995 Inducted posthumously into the American Theater Hall of Fame, 2008[41]

Filmography[edit]

Film[edit]

The Connection (1961) as J. J. Burden Pie in the Sky (1964) as Preacher Black Like Me (1964) as Christopher The Comedians (1967) as Petit Pierre Up Tight!
Up Tight!
(1968) as Clarence (a.k.a. "Daisy") Topaz
Topaz
(1969) as Philippe Dubois The Liberation of L.B. Jones
The Liberation of L.B. Jones
(1970) as L.B. Jones The Cowboys
The Cowboys
(1972) as Jebediah Nightlinger Cisco Pike
Cisco Pike
(1972) as Music Store Owner The World's Greatest Athlete
The World's Greatest Athlete
(1973) as Gazenga Super Fly T.N.T.
Super Fly T.N.T.
(1973) as Dr. Lamine Sonko Uptown Saturday Night
Uptown Saturday Night
(1974) as Congressman Lincoln Logan's Run (1976) as Box Twilight's Last Gleaming
Twilight's Last Gleaming
(1977) as James Forrest Nothing Personal (1980) as Paxton Legal Eagles
Legal Eagles
(1986) as Judge Dawkins Jumpin' Jack Flash (1986) as Archer Lincoln Moments Without Proper Names (1987) Moon 44
Moon 44
(1990) as Chairman Hall, Galactic Mining Corp. (uncredited) The Mambo Kings
The Mambo Kings
(1992) as Fernando Perez Eddie Presley
Eddie Presley
(1992) as Doc Naked in New York
Naked in New York
(1993) as Mr. Ried Last Summer in the Hamptons (1995) as Freddy The Pompatus of Love
The Pompatus of Love
(1995) as Leonard Folder Dear God (1996) as Idris Abraham Forest Warrior
Forest Warrior
(1996) as Clovis Madison Judas Kiss (1998) as Chief Bleeker Morgan's Ferry
Morgan's Ferry
(2001) as Peabo Behind the Broken Words (2003) Unchained Memories
Unchained Memories
(2003) as Reader Sweet Deadly Dreams (2006) as Devlin

Voice[edit]

The Ra Expeditions
The Ra Expeditions
(1972) as Narrator Logan's Run (1976) as Box The Story of Star Wars
The Story of Star Wars
(1977) The Greatest Adventure: Stories from the Bible
Bible
(1986) Foofur
Foofur
(1986) Visionaries: Knights of the Magical Light (1987) as Reekon / Merklynn (voice) The Real Ghostbusters
The Real Ghostbusters
(1988-1989) as Edward 'Big Ed' Zeddemore Oliver & Company (1988) as Francis (voice) Ring Raiders
Ring Raiders
(1989) as Narrator Bill & Ted's Excellent Adventures (1990) The Pirates of Dark Water
The Pirates of Dark Water
(1991) Noel (1992) as Brutus (voice) Batman: The Animated Series (1994) as Dr. Wataki (voice) Freakazoid!
Freakazoid!
(1995) as Great Mystic Gnome (voice) Babe (1995) as Narrator (voice) Spider-Man (1995–1998) as Kingpin / Wilson Fisk (voice) Galapagos: Beyond Darwin (1996) Haiti: Harvest of Hope (1997) MouseHunt (1997) [Theatrical Trailer] (voice) Babe: Pig in the City (1998) as The Narrator (voice) The Wild Thornberrys
The Wild Thornberrys
(1998) The Tulsa Lynching of 1921: A Hidden Story (2000) Treasure Planet
Treasure Planet
(2002) as Mr. Arrow (voice) The Proud Family
The Proud Family
(2003) as Clarence (voice) Garfield: A Tail of Two Kitties (2006) as Narrator (voice) Epic Movie
Epic Movie
(2007) as Narrator (voice) Smiley Face (2007) as Himself (voice)

Television[edit]

That Was The Week That Was
That Was The Week That Was
(1964) as Himself NET Playhouse
NET Playhouse
(1967) The Invaders
The Invaders
episode The Vise (1968) as Arnold Andrew Warren Insight
Insight
(1968) as Stranger Mannix (1968) as Dr. Andrew Josephus Espionage (1968) The Name of the Game (1969-1970) as Dean Marshall / Wamumba The Outcasts (1969) as Gideon The Flip Wilson Show
The Flip Wilson Show
(1972-1973) as Himself Bonanza (1972) as Joshua All in the Family
All in the Family
(1972-1973) as Jean Duval / Hugh Victor Thompson III Sanford and Son
Sanford and Son
(1972) as Osgood Wilcox The Streets of San Francisco
The Streets of San Francisco
(1973) as Yale Courtland Dancy Good Times
Good Times
(1974) as Reverend Sam Barney Miller
Barney Miller
(1975) as Charlie Evans Jeffers Starsky and Hutch
Starsky and Hutch
(1977) as Quatraine Maude (1977-1978) as Mr. Butterfield King
King
(1978) as Philip Harrison Soap (1979–1981) as Saunders Benson (1980) as Howard Walker Hart to Hart
Hart to Hart
(1981) The Cosby Show
The Cosby Show
(1986-1987) as Dr. Barnabus Foster

Magnum, P.I.
Magnum, P.I.
(1983) as Carlton For Us the Living: The Medgar Evers Story (1983) as Gloster Current Head of the Class
Head of the Class
(1986) as Mr. Thomas 227 (1987) as Albert Henry Highway to Heaven
Highway to Heaven
(1988) as Dr. Hudsbeth Falcon Crest
Falcon Crest
(1988) as Rosemont A Different World
A Different World
(1988-1992) as Dr. Barnabus Foster Ring Raiders
Ring Raiders
(1989) as Max Miles Columbo: Rest in Peace Mrs. Columbo (1990) as Dr. Steadman Father Dowling Mysteries
Father Dowling Mysteries
(1990) as Dennis Cray SeaQuest DSV
SeaQuest DSV
(1993-1994) as Dr. Raleigh Young The John Larroquette Show
The John Larroquette Show
(1994) as Mr. Davis New York Undercover
New York Undercover
(1996) as Dr. Johnson Cosby
Cosby
(1996) as George Lucas, Hilton's Brother The Wild Thornberrys
The Wild Thornberrys
(1999) as Komodo Dragon / Goulam ER (1999) as Rev. Matthew Lynn Hope Island (1999) as Judge Patrick Bradley The Shield
The Shield
(2002) as Bryce Wyms Law & Order (1992-2003) as Aaron Miller / Sir Idris Balewa Will and Grace
Will and Grace
(2004) as Linus Side Order of Life
Side Order of Life
(2007) as Clarence

Theatre[edit]

The Taming of the Shrew, New York Shakespeare Festival, East River Park Amphitheater, New York City, 1956. Soothsayer and Pindarus, Julius Caesar, New York Shakespeare Festival, East River Park Amphitheater, 1956. Aaron, Titus Andronicus, New York Shakespeare Festival, Theatre of Emmanuel Presbyterian Church, New York City, 1957. Cothurnus, Aria da Capo, Theatre Marquee, New York City, 1958. Understudy for title role, Othello, New York Shakespeare Festival, Belvedere Lake Theatre, New York City, 1958. Royal Baron, The Cool World, Eugene O'Neill Theatre, New York City, 1960. Understudy for title role, Purlie
Purlie
Victorious, Cort Theatre, New York City, 1961. Archibald Wellington, The Blacks: A Clown Show, St. Mark's Playhouse, New York City, 1961–62. Corporal, General Seeger, Lyceum Theatre, New York City, 1962. Deacon Sitter Morris, Tiger, Tiger, Burning Bright, Booth Theatre, New York City, 1962–63. Fool, King
King
Lear, New York Shakespeare Festival, Delacorte Theatre, Public Theatre, New York City, 1962. Brecht on Brecht (revue), Theatre de Lys, now Lucille Lortel Theatre, New York City, 1962, then Arena Stage, Washington, DC, performed as a staged reading at Sheridan Square Playhouse, New York City, and at Delacorte Theatre, Public Theatre, all 1963. Autolycus, The Winter's Tale, New York Shakespeare Festival, Delacorte Theatre, Public Theatre, 1963. Narrator, The Ballad of the Sad Cafe, Martin Beck Theatre, New York City, 1963. Street singer, The Threepenny Opera, Arena Stage, 1963. Babu, Benito Cereno, American Place Theatre, New York City, beginning 1963, later produced as part of a double-bill titled The Old Glory, Theatre of St. Clement's Church, New York City, 1964. Hell Is Other People (readings), Theatre at Carnegie Hall, New York City, 1964. Male lead, The Empty Room, Village South Theatre, New York City, 1964. St. Just, Danton's Death, Vivian Beaumont Theatre, Lincoln Center, New York City, 1965. Ulysses, Troilus and Cressida, New York Shakespeare Festival, Delacorte Theatre, Public Theatre, 1965. Beyond the Fringe, Goodspeed Opera House, East Had-dam, CT, 1966.

Babu, Benito Cereno, Playhouse in the Park, Cincinnati, OH, 1966. The gardener, Sodom and Gomorrah, Playhouse in the Park, 1966. Mendoza, Man and Superman, Playhouse in the Park, 1966. Sheridan Whiteside, The Man Who Came to Dinner, Long Wharf Theatre, New Haven, CT, 1966. An Evening of Negro
Negro
Poetry and Folk Music, Delacorte Theatre, Public Theatre, 1966; produced as A Hand Is on the Gate, Longacre Theatre, New York City, 1966; revived at Afro-American Studio, New York City, 1976–77. Mosca, Volpone, New York Shakespeare Festival, Mobile Theatre, New York City, 1967. Makak, The Dream on Monkey Mountain, Center Theatre Group, Mark Taper Forum, Los Angeles, 1970, then St. Mark's Playhouse, 1971. A Rap on Race, New Theatre for Now, Los Angeles, 1971–72. As You Like It, Pilgrimage Theatre, Los Angeles, 1973. Ephraim Cabot, Desire Under the Elms, Academy Festival Theatre, Lake Forest, Illinois, 1974. Behind the Broken Words (poetry reading), With Anthony Zerbe. Washington Theatre Club, Washington, DC, 1974, revived at American Place Theatre, 1981, and Denver Center for the Performing Arts, Denver, CO, 2002. Babu, Benito Cereno, American Place Theatre, 1976. Albert Perez Jordan, Remembrance, New York Shakespeare Festival, Other Stage, Public Theatre, New York City, 1979. Pantomime, Goodman Theatre, Chicago, 1981–82. Right Reverend J. D. Montgomery, My One and Only, St. James Theatre, New York City, 1983–84. M. Noirtier, The Count of Monte Cristo, Eisenhower Theatre, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, Washington, DC, 1985. Joe Turner's Come and Gone, Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Theatre Center, Los Angeles, 1989, then Pittsburgh Public Theatre, Pittsburgh, PA, 1989–90. Holloway, Two Trains Running, Eisenhower Theatre, Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts, 1991, then Walter Kerr Theatre, New York City, 1992. House of Flowers, as Roscoe Lee Brown. City Center Encores!, City Center Theatre, New York City, 2003. Balthazar, Romeo and Juliet, New York Shakespeare Festival, New York cities, 1957.

Other work[edit] Recordings[edit]

Enjoyment of Poetry: Memorial Program for Claude McKay, Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature, 1967. Poems, by Edna St. Vincent Millay, Archive of Recorded Poetry and Literature, 1968. Caribbean, Random House Audio, 1989. Selected Shorts: A Celebration of the Short Story, Listening Library, 1989. Martin Luther King
King
Edition: New Testament Value Pack, World Bible Publishing Company, 1991. Audio Bible, World Bible
Bible
Publishing, 1991. Bible
Bible
for Today, New Testament, 1992. The Autobiography of Malcolm X, with Joe Morton. Simon & Schuster Audio, 1992. M. C. Higgins, the Great, by Virginia Hamilton Recorded Books, 1993.

Kwanzaa
Kwanzaa
Folktales, by Gordon Lewis, Warner Adult, 1994. The Word Workout: 10 Easy Exercises for a Stronger Vocabulary, Dove Books Audio, 1995. The Complete Sonnets of William Shakespeare: With A Lover's Complaint and Selected Songs, Dove Books Audio, 1996. The Poetry of Robert Frost, Dove Books Audio, 1996. Masterpieces of Modern Short Fiction, Audio Literature, 1998. The Haunting of Hill House, New Star Media, 1999. The Bible: Old Testament, King
King
James Version, Audio Literature, 2001. The Poetry of Robert Frost, New Millennium Audio, 2001. The Poetry of Walt Whitman, New Millennium Audio, 2001. KJV on Cassette: New Testament, Nelson Bibles, 2003.

Radio Appearances[edit]

Native villager, The Endless Road, CBS Radio Workshop, CBS, 1956. Performer of Shakespearean roles for CBC Radio.

Writings[edit]

An Evening of Negro
Negro
Poetry and Folk Music
Folk Music
(readings), Delacorte Theatre, Public Theatre, 1966, produced as A Hand Is on the Gate, Longacre Theatre, New York City, 1966, revived at Afro-American Studio, New York City, 1976–77. Behind the Broken Words (poetry reading), Washington Theatre Club, Washington, DC, 1974, revived at American Place Theatre, New York City, 1981, and Denver Center for the Performing Arts, 2002.

References[edit]

^ a b Roscoe L Browne. United States Social Security Death Index. Church of Latter Day Saints. FamilySearch.org. Retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ Browne's year of birth was cited as 1925 through much of his career and at the time of his death. Since then evidence has emerged that he was actually born three years earlier, the most notable of which would be the Social Security Death Index: Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
[Roscoe L Browne] Gender: Male Race: Black Birth Date: 2 May 1922 Birth Place: Woodbury, New Jersey Father Name: Sylvanus Browne Mother Name: Louie [sic] L Usher Death Date: 11 Apr 2007 Type of Claim: Original SSN. Notes: Jul 1940: Name listed as ROSCOE LEE BROWNE; 21 Apr 2007: Name listed as ROSCOE L BROWNE Source Information: Ancestry.com. U.S., Social Security Applications and Claims Index. Other websites and census data also confirm 1922, as well as a YouTube video in which the actor gives 1922 as his year of birth. However, obituaries in the New York Times, The Guardian and the Los Angeles Times, as well as his profile at IBDb, cite 1925. ^ a b c Roscoe Lee Browne. Awards and Nominations Television Academy. Retrieved February 23, 2016. ^ Two Trains Running
Two Trains Running
Internet Broadway Database, The Broadway League; retrieved February 23, 2016 ^ Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
profile, Internet Broadway Database; retrieved February 23, 2016. ^ Inductees. Roscoe Lee Browne. Image 80 of 295. Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 23, 2016 ^ Theater Hall of Fame American Theatre Critics Association. Retrieved February 23, 2016. ^ Dillard, Harrison; McIntosh, Michael (July 17, 2012). Bones: The Life and Times of Harrison Dillard. AuthorHouse. pp. 48–49. [ISBN missing] ^ Roscoe Lee Browne, Encyclopedia.com; retrieved March 1, 2016. ^ a b Roscoe Lee Browne, lortel.org; retrieved March 19, 2015. ^ a b c d Robertson, Campbell (April 12, 2007). "Roscoe Lee Browne, 81, (sic) Actor of Stage and Screen, Dies". The New York Times.  ^ Annals of College: When She Called Off the Blocks. September 21, 2010. Retrieved March 3, 2016 ^ The Story of Star Wars
The Story of Star Wars
(Complete) Disney Audio Archive. YouTube. November 15, 2012. Retrieved March 3, 2016. ^ It’s Time To Listen To The Story Of Star Wars…On 8-Track Tape! Retroist. April 27, 2014. Retrieved March 3, 2016. ^ Vinyl Movies... In Space Age Stereo! Space:1970. March 19, 2010. Retrieved March 3, 2016 ^ Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
- The Story Of Star Wars, audiophileusa.com; retrieved March 3, 2016. ^ STAR WARS Week: Happy Star Wars Day!, Sound Beat.org; retrieved March 3, 2016. ^ Quincy Troupe. “Roscoe Lee Browne” profile, Essence (December 1976), p. 92, at blackpast.org. ^ Rawson, Christopher (2009-01-28). "Lane, Hamlisch among Theater Hall of Fame inductees". Post-Gazette.com. Retrieved 2011-03-27.  ^ Jet Magazine profile. Retrieved March 19, 2015. ^ Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
profile, Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016. ^ "Roscoe Lee Browne, 81, Actor of Stage and Screen, Dies", The New York Times, April 12, 2007. Retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ "Roscoe Lee Browne, 81; award-winning film, stage, TV actor", Los Angeles Times, April 12, 2007; retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ Roscoe Lee Browne, 81, actor, Variety, April 12, 2007; retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ "Actor Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
dies at 81", The Hollywood Reporter. Retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
obituary, The Guardian. Retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
profile, NNDB.com, Soylent Communications. 2014. Retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ Simonson, Robert (April 12, 2007). "Roscoe Lee Browne, Dignified Stage Actor, Dies at 81". Playbill. Retrieved February 12, 2016.  ^ Congress of the United States. U.S. House of Representatives. Washington D.C. In Memoriam Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
Scholarship Fund website. Retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
profile, visionaryproject.org; retrieved February 12, 2016. ^ "Actor Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
dies at 81 (sic) in Los Angeles". International Herald Tribune. Associated Press. April 11, 2007. Retrieved 2007-04-17.  ^ Roscoe L. Browne: Death Record from the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) - GenealogyBank(subscription required) ^ Profile Familysearch.org. Retrieved March 19, 2015. ^ 1969 – 1979 Awards LA Drama Critics Circle. 2016. Retrieved February 23, 2016 ^ Past Western Heritage Award
Western Heritage Award
Winners. National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum. 2016. Retrieved March 1, 2016 ^ Inductees. Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
Image 80 of 295. Black Filmmakers Hall of Fame. Retrieved February 23, 2016 ^ 1980–1989 Awards, LA Drama Critics Circle. 2016. Retrieved February 23, 2016 ^ Two Trains Running
Two Trains Running
Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. 2001- 2016. Retrieved February 23, 2016 ^ Roscoe Lee Browne. Director, Performer. Internet Broadway Database. The Broadway League. 2001- 2016. Retrieved February 23, 2016 ^ HHA Nominees & Recipients, theatrewashington.org; retrieved March 1, 2016. ^ Theater Hall of Fame, americantheatrecritics.org; retrieved February 23, 2016.

External links[edit]

Biography portal

Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
on IMDb Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
on Internet Theatre Database Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
at AllMovie Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
at Encyclopedia.com. Retrieved March 1, 2016 Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
profile, at the University of Wisconsin's Actors Studio audio collection. Retrieved March 19, 2015. Roscoe Lee Browne's oral history video excerpts, visionaryproject.com. Retrieved March 19, 2015. Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
biography, TheHistoryMakers.com. Retrieved March 19, 2015. Profile, blackpast.org. Retrieved March 19, 2015. Roscoe Lee Browne: My Childhood (video interview). The National Visionary Leadership Project (NVLP)

v t e

Primetime Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Guest Actor in a Comedy Series

Roscoe Lee Browne
Roscoe Lee Browne
(1986) John Cleese
John Cleese
(1987) Cleavon Little
Cleavon Little
(1989) Jay Thomas
Jay Thomas
(1990) Jay Thomas
Jay Thomas
(1991) No Award (1992) David Clennon (1993) Martin Sheen
Martin Sheen
(1994) Carl Reiner
Carl Reiner
(1995) Tim Conway
Tim Conway
(1996) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1997) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1998) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
(1999) Bruce Willis
Bruce Willis
(2000) Derek Jacobi
Derek Jacobi
(2001) Anthony LaPaglia
Anthony LaPaglia
(2002) Gene Wilder
Gene Wilder
(2003) John Turturro
John Turturro
(2004) Bobby Cannavale
Bobby Cannavale
(2005) Leslie Jordan
Leslie Jordan
(2006) Stanley Tucci
Stanley Tucci
(2007) Tim Conway
Tim Conway
(2008) Justin Timberlake
Justin Timberlake
(2009) Neil Patrick Harris
Neil Patrick Harris
(2010) Justin Timberlake
Justin Timberlake
(2011) Jimmy Fallon
Jimmy Fallon
(2012) Bob Newhart
Bob Newhart
(2013) Jimmy Fallon
Jimmy Fallon
(2014) Bradley Whitford
Bradley Whitford
(2015) Peter Scolari (2016) Dave Chappelle
Dave Chappelle
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 10057721 LCCN: n82224979 ISNI: 0000 0001 2319 837X GND: 173931960 BNF: cb14159684m (data) BIBSYS: 8052342 SN

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