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Ronald Wayne Shelton (born September 15, 1945) is an American film director and screenwriter[1][2] and former minor league baseball infielder. Shelton is known for the many films he has made about sports. His 1988 film Bull Durham, based in-part off his own baseball experiences, earned him an Academy Award
Academy Award
nomination for Best Original Screenplay. A former minor league baseball infielder in Baltimore's farm system, he played with the Bluefield Orioles (Rookie), Stockton Ports (A), Dallas-Fort Worth Spurs (AA) and Rochester Red Wings
Rochester Red Wings
(AAA) between 1967-1971.

Contents

1 Film career 2 Personal life 3 Filmography

3.1 As writer/director 3.2 As writer only 3.3 As director only

4 References 5 External links

Film career[edit] After working on the scripts for a number of films, including co-writing the Nick Nolte
Nick Nolte
and Gene Hackman
Gene Hackman
political drama Under Fire, Shelton made his directorial debut with Bull Durham[3] in 1988. Set in the world of minor league baseball, the romantic comedy stars Kevin Costner and Susan Sarandon. Shelton's screenplay netted him multiple awards, including Best Original Script from the Writer's Guild of America, and Best Script from the US National Society of Film Critics. It was also nominated for an Academy Award. Shelton worked with Costner again on the 1996 golf-themed romantic comedy Tin Cup.[4] Other films as writer and director included the boxing comedy Play It to the Bone, a critical and commercial flop, and acclaimed 1992 comedy White Men Can't Jump,[3] starring Woody Harrelson and Wesley Snipes
Wesley Snipes
as two basketball hustlers. Calling the latter film "very smart and very funny", and "not simply a basketball movie," critic Roger Ebert
Roger Ebert
wrote that Shelton "knows how his characters talk and sound, and how they get into each other's minds with non-stop talking and boasting." Shelton has also written and directed two biopics: Cobb, in which Tommy Lee Jones
Tommy Lee Jones
portrayed record-breaking baseballer Ty Cobb, and Blaze, which starred Paul Newman
Paul Newman
as colourful Louisiana Governor Earl Long.[2] He wrote or co-wrote other sports-themed films including The Best of Times, starring Robin Williams
Robin Williams
and Kurt Russell
Kurt Russell
as former football teammates; the basketball drama Blue Chips, starring Nick Nolte, and a boxing comedy, The Great White Hype, starring Samuel L. Jackson. He also directed two Los Angeles-based crime films, Dark Blue, a drama starring Kurt Russell,[3] and Hollywood Homicide, a comedy with Harrison Ford. Personal life[edit] Shelton grew up in Montecito, California, the oldest of four brothers. He is an alumnus of Santa Barbara High School
Santa Barbara High School
and of the University of Arizona and Westmont College. Shelton is married to Canadian-born actress Lolita Davidovich, who has appeared in several of his films, including taking the title role of Blaze Starr
Blaze Starr
in Blaze.[2] The couple have two children and reside in Los Angeles and Ojai, California. Shelton has two daughters with his first wife, filmmaker Lois Shelton. On July 7, 2017, Shelton was inducted into the Rochester Red Wings Hall of Fame. Filmography[edit] As writer/director[edit]

Bull Durham
Bull Durham
(1988) Blaze (1989) White Men Can't Jump
White Men Can't Jump
(1992) Cobb (1994) Tin Cup
Tin Cup
(1996) with John Norville Play It to the Bone
Play It to the Bone
(1999) Hollywood Homicide
Hollywood Homicide
(2003) with Robert Souza Jordan Rides the Bus (2010, TV) Hound Dogs (2011, TV) Just Getting Started (2017)

As writer only[edit]

Under Fire (1983) with Clayton Frohman The Best of Times (1986) Blue Chips (1994) The Great White Hype
The Great White Hype
(1996) with Tony Hendra Bad Boys II (2003) with Jerry Stahl, story credit shared with The Wibberleys

As director only[edit]

Dark Blue (2002)

References[edit]

^ Benson, Sheila (1989-12-13). "MOVIE REVIEW : 'Blaze' Sizzles Even Over Low Flame". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2012-07-06.  ^ a b c Maslin, Janet (1989-12-13). "Movie Review - Blaze - Review/Film; 'Blaze,' a Story of a Rogue and a Stripper". The New York Times. Retrieved 2012-07-06.  ^ a b c Taylor, Ella (2003-02-20). "Our Dark Blue Places - Page 1 - Film+TV - Los Angeles". LA Weekly. Retrieved 2012-05-22.  ^ Maslin, Janet (August 16, 1996). " Tin Cup
Tin Cup
(1996) When Golf Is Life And Life a Game". The New York Times. 

External links[edit]

Ron Shelton on IMDb Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference

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Films directed by Ron Shelton

Bull Durham
Bull Durham
(1988) Blaze (1989) White Men Can't Jump
White Men Can't Jump
(1992) Cobb (1994) Tin Cup
Tin Cup
(1996) Play It to the Bone
Play It to the Bone
(1999) Dark Blue (2002) Hollywood Homicide
Hollywood Homicide
(2003) Just Getting Started (2017)

v t e

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Screenplay

1967–2000

David Newman and Robert Benton (1967) John Cassavetes
John Cassavetes
(1968) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Éric Rohmer
Éric Rohmer
(1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1972) George Lucas, Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck (1973) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Alain Tanner
Alain Tanner
and John Berger
John Berger
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
(1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) John Guare
John Guare
(1981) Murray Schisgal and Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1982) Bill Forsyth
Bill Forsyth
(1983) Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel and Bruce Jay Friedman (1984) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1985) Hanif Kureishi
Hanif Kureishi
(1986) John Boorman
John Boorman
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
and Daniel Yost (1989) Charles Burnett (1990) David Cronenberg
David Cronenberg
(1991) David Webb Peoples (1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Amy Heckerling (1995) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Scott Frank (1998) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Ronald Harwood (2002) Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Noah Baumbach
Noah Baumbach
(2005) Peter Morgan (2006) Tamara Jenkins
Tamara Jenkins
(2007) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2008) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Asghar Farhadi
Asghar Farhadi
(2011) Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
(2012) Richard Linklater, Ethan Hawke, and Julie Delpy
Julie Delpy
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
(2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
(2017)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay

Original Drama (1969–1983, retired)

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) Steve Shagan (1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Arthur Laurents
Arthur Laurents
(1977) Nancy Dowd, Robert C. Jones and Waldo Salt (1978) Mike Gray, T. S. Cook and James Bridges (1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
and Trevor Griffiths (1981) Melissa Mathison
Melissa Mathison
(1982) Horton Foote (1983)

Original Comedy (1969–1983, retired)

Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Peter Bogdanovich, Buck Henry, David Newman and Robert Benton (1972) Melvin Frank and Jack Rose (1973) Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
and Alan Uger (1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Bill Lancaster
Bill Lancaster
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Sheldon Keller (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Nancy Meyers, Harvey Miller and Charles Shyer
Charles Shyer
(1980) Steve Gordon (1981) Don McGuire, Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Murray Schisgal (1982) Lawrence Kasdan
Lawrence Kasdan
and Barbara Benedek (1983)

Original Screenplay (1984–present)

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) William Kelley and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1989) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(1994) Randall Wallace (1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
and Mark Andrus (1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Michael Moore
Michael Moore
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Hugo Guinness (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 85112119 LCCN: n92066896 ISNI: 0000 0001 1772 9576 GND: 137746792 SUDOC: 139293019 BNF: cb14002747s (data) NDL: 00744505 BNE: XX4579825 SN

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