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Roman mythology
Roman mythology
is the body of traditional stories pertaining to ancient Rome's legendary origins and religious system, as represented in the literature and visual arts of the Romans. "Roman mythology" may also refer to the modern study of these representations, and to the subject matter as represented in the literature and art of other cultures in any period. The Romans usually treated their traditional narratives as historical, even when these have miraculous or supernatural elements. The stories are often concerned with politics and morality, and how an individual's personal integrity relates to his or her responsibility to the community or Roman state. Heroism is an important theme. When the stories illuminate Roman religious practices, they are more concerned with ritual, augury, and institutions than with theology or cosmogony.[1] The study of Roman religion and myth is complicated by the early influence of Greek religion on the Italian peninsula
Italian peninsula
during Rome's protohistory, and by the later artistic imitation of Greek literary models by Roman authors. In matters of theology, the Romans were curiously eager to identify their own gods with those of the Greeks (interpretatio graeca), and to reinterpret stories about Greek deities under the names of their Roman counterparts.[2] Rome's early myths and legends also have a dynamic relationship with Etruscan religion, less documented than that of the Greeks. While Roman mythology
Roman mythology
may lack a body of divine narratives as extensive as that found in Greek literature,[3] Romulus and Remus suckling the she-wolf is as famous as any image from Greek mythology except for the Trojan Horse.[4] Because Latin literature
Latin literature
was more widely known in Europe throughout the Middle Ages
Middle Ages
and into the Renaissance, the interpretations of Greek myths by the Romans often had the greater influence on narrative and pictorial representations of "classical mythology" than Greek sources. In particular, the versions of Greek myths in Ovid's Metamorphoses, written during the reign of Augustus, came to be regarded as canonical.

Contents

1 The nature of Roman myth

1.1 Founding myths 1.2 Other myths

2 Religion and myth

2.1 Foreign gods

3 See also 4 References 5 Sources

The nature of Roman myth[edit]

In this wall painting from Pompeii, Venus looks on while the physician Iapyx
Iapyx
tends to the wound of her son, Aeneas; the tearful boy is her grandson Ascanius, also known as Iulus, legendary ancestor[citation needed] of Julius Caesar
Julius Caesar
and the Julio- Claudian
Claudian
dynasty

Because ritual played the central role in Roman religion that myth did for the Greeks, it is sometimes doubted that the Romans had much of a native mythology. This perception is a product of Romanticism
Romanticism
and the classical scholarship of the 19th century, which valued Greek civilization as more "authentically creative."[5] From the Renaissance to the 18th century, however, Roman myths were an inspiration particularly for European painting.[6] The Roman tradition is rich in historical myths, or legends, concerning the foundation and rise of the city. These narratives focus on human actors, with only occasional intervention from deities but a pervasive sense of divinely ordered destiny. In Rome's earliest period, history and myth have a mutual and complementary relationship.[7] As T. P. Wiseman notes:

The Roman stories still matter, as they mattered to Dante
Dante
in 1300 and Shakespeare
Shakespeare
in 1600 and the founding fathers of the United States in 1776. What does it take to be a free citizen? Can a superpower still be a republic? How does well-meaning authority turn into murderous tyranny?[6]

Major sources for Roman myth include the Aeneid
Aeneid
of Vergil
Vergil
and the first few books of Livy's history as well as Dionysius' s Roman Antiquities. Other important sources are the Fasti of Ovid, a six-book poem structured by the Roman religious calendar, and the fourth book of elegies by Propertius. Scenes from Roman myth also appear in Roman wall painting, coins, and sculpture, particularly reliefs. Founding myths[edit] Main article: Founding of Rome The Aeneid
Aeneid
and Livy's early history are the best extant sources for Rome's founding myths. Material from Greek heroic legend was grafted onto this native stock at an early date. The Trojan prince Aeneas
Aeneas
was cast as husband of Lavinia, daughter of King Latinus, patronymical ancestor of the Latini, and therefore through a convoluted revisionist genealogy as forebear of Romulus and Remus. By extension, the Trojans were adopted as the mythical ancestors of the Roman people.[8] Other myths[edit]

Mucius Scaevola in the Presence of Lars Porsenna (early 1640s) by Matthias Stom

Polyphemus
Polyphemus
hears of the arrival of Galatea; ancient Roman fresco painted in the "Fourth Style" of Pompeii
Pompeii
(45-79 AD)

The characteristic myths of Rome
Rome
are often political or moral, that is, they deal with the development of Roman government in accordance with divine law, as expressed by Roman religion, and with demonstrations of the individual's adherence to moral expectations (mos maiorum) or failures to do so.

Rape of the Sabine
Sabine
women, explaining the importance of the Sabines
Sabines
in the formation of Roman culture, and the growth of Rome
Rome
through conflict and alliance. Numa Pompilius, the Sabine
Sabine
second king of Rome
Rome
who consorted with the nymph Egeria and established many of Rome's legal and religious institutions. Servius
Servius
Tullius, the sixth king of Rome, whose mysterious origins were freely mythologized and who was said to have been the lover of the goddess Fortuna. The Tarpeian Rock, and why it was used for the execution of traitors. Lucretia, whose self-sacrifice prompted the overthrow of the early Roman monarchy and led to the establishment of the Republic. Cloelia, A Roman woman taken hostage by Lars Porsena. She escaped the Clusian camp with a group of Roman virgins. Horatius at the bridge, on the importance of individual valor. Mucius Scaevola, who thrust his right hand into the fire to prove his loyalty to Rome. Caeculus and the founding of Praeneste.[9] Manlius and the geese, about divine intervention at the Gallic siege of Rome.[10] Stories pertaining to the Nonae Caprotinae and Poplifugia festivals.[11] Coriolanus, a story of politics and morality. The Etruscan city of Corythus as the "cradle" of Trojan and Italian civilization.[12] The arrival of the Great Mother (Cybele) in Rome.[13]

Religion and myth[edit] Main article: Religion in ancient Rome Divine narrative played a more important role in the system of Greek religious belief than among the Romans, for whom ritual and cult were primary. Although Roman religion was not based on scriptures and exegesis, priestly literature was one of the earliest written forms of Latin
Latin
prose.[14] The books (libri) and commentaries (commentarii) of the College of Pontiffs
College of Pontiffs
and of the augurs contained religious procedures, prayers, and rulings and opinions on points of religious law.[15] Although at least some of this archived material was available for consultation by the Roman senate, it was often occultum genus litterarum,[16] an arcane form of literature to which by definition only priests had access.[17] Prophecies pertaining to world history and Rome's destiny turn up fortuitously at critical junctures in history, discovered suddenly in the nebulous Sibylline books, which according to legend were purchased by Tarquin the Proud in the late 6th century BC from the Cumaean Sibyl. Some aspects of archaic Roman religion were preserved by the lost theological works of the 1st-century BC scholar Varro, known through other classical and Christian authors.

Capitoline Triad

At the head of the earliest pantheon were the so-called Archaic Triad of Jupiter, Mars, and Quirinus, whose flamens were of the highest order, and Janus
Janus
and Vesta. According to tradition, the founder of Roman religion was Numa Pompilius, the Sabine
Sabine
second king of Rome, who was believed to have had as his consort and adviser a Roman goddess or nymph of fountains and prophecy, Egeria. The Etruscan-influenced Capitoline Triad
Capitoline Triad
of Jupiter, Juno and Minerva
Minerva
later became central to official religion, replacing the Archaic Triad
Archaic Triad
— an unusual example within Indo-European religion
Indo-European religion
of a supreme triad formed of two female deities and only one male. The cult of Diana was established on the Aventine Hill, but the most famous Roman manifestation of this goddess may be Diana Nemorensis, owing to the attention paid to her cult by J.G. Frazer
J.G. Frazer
in the mythographical classic The Golden Bough.

Punishment of Ixion: in the center is Mercury holding the caduceus and on the right Juno sits on her throne. Behind her Iris stands and gestures. On the left is Vulcan (blond figure) standing behind the wheel, manning it, with Ixion
Ixion
already tied to it. Nephele
Nephele
sits at Mercury's feet; a Roman fresco from the eastern wall of the triclinium in the House of the Vettii, Pompeii, Fourth Style (60-79 AD).

The gods represented distinctly the practical needs of daily life, and they were scrupulously accorded the rites and offerings considered proper. Early Roman divinities included a host of "specialist gods" whose names were invoked in the carrying out of various specific activities. Fragments of old ritual accompanying such acts as plowing or sowing reveal that at every stage of the operation a separate deity was invoked, the name of each deity being regularly derived from the verb for the operation. Tutelary deities were particularly important in ancient Rome. Thus, Janus
Janus
and Vesta guarded the door and hearth, the Lares
Lares
protected the field and house, Pales
Pales
the pasture, Saturn the sowing, Ceres the growth of the grain, Pomona the fruit, and Consus
Consus
and Ops
Ops
the harvest. Even the majestic Jupiter, the ruler of the gods, was honored for the aid his rains might give to the farms and vineyards. In his more encompassing character he was considered, through his weapon of lightning, the director of human activity and, by his widespread domain, the protector of the Romans in their military activities beyond the borders of their own community. Prominent in early times were the gods Mars and Quirinus, who were often identified with each other. Mars was a god of war; he was honored in March and October. Quirinus
Quirinus
is thought by modern scholars to have been the patron of the armed community in time of peace. The 19th-century scholar Georg Wissowa[18] thought that the Romans distinguished two classes of gods, the di indigetes and the di novensides or novensiles: the indigetes were the original gods of the Roman state, their names and nature indicated by the titles of the earliest priests and by the fixed festivals of the calendar, with 30 such gods honored by special festivals; the novensides were later divinities whose cults were introduced to the city in the historical period, usually at a known date and in response to a specific crisis or felt need. Arnaldo Momigliano and others, however, have argued that this distinction cannot be maintained.[19] During the war with Hannibal, any distinction between "indigenous" and "immigrant" gods begins to fade, and the Romans embraced diverse gods from various cultures as a sign of strength and universal divine favor.[20] Foreign gods[edit]

Mithras
Mithras
in a Roman wall painting

The absorption of neighboring local gods took place as the Roman state conquered the surrounding territory. The Romans commonly granted the local gods of the conquered territory the same honors as the earlier gods of the Roman state religion. In addition to Castor and Pollux, the conquered settlements in Italy seem to have contributed to the Roman pantheon Diana, Minerva, Hercules, Venus, and deities of lesser rank, some of whom were Italic divinities, others originally derived from the Greek culture of Magna Graecia. In 203 BC, the cult object embodying Cybele
Cybele
was brought from Pessinus
Pessinus
in Phrygia
Phrygia
and welcomed with due ceremony to Rome, centuries before the territory was annexed formally. Both Lucretius
Lucretius
and Catullus, poets contemporary in the mid-1st century BC, offer disapproving glimpses of her wildly ecstatic cult. In some instances, deities of an enemy power were formally invited through the ritual of evocatio to take up their abode in new sanctuaries at Rome. Communities of foreigners (peregrini) and former slaves (libertini) continued their own religious practices within the city. In this way Mithras
Mithras
came to Rome
Rome
and his popularity within the Roman army
Roman army
spread his cult as far afield as Roman Britain. The important Roman deities were eventually identified with the more anthropomorphic Greek gods and goddesses, and assumed many of their attributes and myths. See also[edit]

Mythology portal Classical Civilisation portal

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Roman mythology.

Ancient Rome List of Metamorphoses
Metamorphoses
characters Roman polytheistic reconstructionism The Golden Bough
The Golden Bough
(mythology) List of Roman gods

References[edit]

^ John North, Roman Religion (Cambridge University Press, 2000) pp. 4ff. ^ North, Roman Religion, pp. 4–5. ^ North, Roman Religion, p. 4. ^ T. P. Wiseman, Remus: A Roman Myth
Myth
(Cambridge University Press, 1995), p. xiii. ^ T. P. Wiseman, The Myths of Rome
Rome
(University of Exeter Press, 2004), preface (n.p.). ^ a b Wiseman, The Myths of Rome, preface. ^ Alexandre Grandazzi, The Foundation of Rome: Myth
Myth
and History (Cornell University Press, 1997), pp. 45–46. ^ See also Lusus Troiae. ^ J.N. Bremmer and N.M. Horsfall, Roman Myth
Myth
and Mythography (University of London Institute of Classical Studies, 1987), pp. 49–62. ^ Bremmer and Horsfall, pp. 63–75. ^ Bremmer and Horsfall, pp. 76–88. ^ Bremmer and Horsfall, pp. 89–104; Larissa Bonfante, Etruscan Life and Afterlife: A Handbook of Etruscan Studies (Wayne State University Press, 1986), p. 25. ^ Bremmer and Horsfall, pp. 105–111. ^ Moses Hadas, A History of Latin
Latin
Literature (Columbia University Press, 1952), p. 15 online. ^ C.O. Brink, Horace
Horace
on Poetry. Epistles Book II: The Letters to Augustus
Augustus
and Florus
Florus
(Cambridge University Press, 1982), p. 64 online. ^ Cicero, De domo sua 138. ^ Jerzy Linderski, "The libri reconditi," Harvard Studies in Classical Philology 89 (1985) 207–234. ^ Georg Wissowa, De dis Romanorum indigetibus et novensidibus disputatio (1892), full text (in Latin) online. ^ Arnaldo Momigliano, "From Bachofen to Cumont," in A.D. Momigliano: Studies on Modern Scholarship (University of California Press, 1994), p. 319; Franz Altheim, A History of Roman Religion, as translated by Harold Mattingly (London, 1938), pp. 110–112; Mary Beard, J.A. North and S.R.F. Price. Religions of Rome: A History (Cambridge University Press, 1998), vol. 1, p. 158, note 7. ^ William Warde Fowler, The Religious Experience of the Roman People (London, 1922) pp. 157 and 319; J.S. Wacher, The Roman World (Routledge, 1987, 2002), p. 751.

Sources[edit]

Alan Cameron Greek Mythography
Mythography
in the Roman World (2005) OUP, Oxford (reviewed by T P Wiseman in Times Literary Supplement 13 May 2005 page 29) Lexicon Iconographicum Mythologiae Classicae (LIMC) (1981–1999, Artemis-Verlag, 9 volumes), Supplementum (2009, Artemis_Verlag). LIMC-France (LIMC) : databases dedicated to Graeco-Roman mythology and its iconography.

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