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Roberto "Robbie" Alomar Velázquez (/ˈæləmɑːr/; Spanish pronunciation: [aloˈmar]; born February 5, 1968)[1] is a former Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
player (1988–2004), regarded highly as a second baseman.[2][3] During his career, the 12-time All-Star won more Gold Gloves (10) than any other second baseman in baseball history, and also won the third-most Silver Slugger Awards (4) for a second baseman.[4] On January 5, 2011, Alomar was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame, in his second year of eligibility. He became the first Hall of Fame member to be inducted as a Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
player.[5] Currently, Alomar serves as a Special
Special
Advisor to the Blue Jays.[6] Alomar was a switch-hitter and threw right-handed. He is the son of Sandy Alomar, Sr.,[7] a former All-Star second baseman with a 15-year MLB career. His older brother, Sandy Alomar, Jr., was a Major League All-Star catcher and is now the first base coach for the Cleveland Indians.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Career

2.1 San Diego Padres 2.2 Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays 2.3 Baltimore Orioles

2.3.1 Spitting incident

2.4 Cleveland Indians 2.5 Last years 2.6 Hall of Fame induction

3 Personal life 4 Career milestones 5 Awards 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Early life[edit] Alomar was born in Ponce, Puerto Rico
Ponce, Puerto Rico
and raised in Salinas, Puerto Rico.[8] The son of Santos "Sandy" Alomar, Sr. and María Velázquez, Alomar grew up in a baseball family.[1] He and his older brother Sandy Jr. were raised mostly by their mother, due to their father's Major League career.[9] When school in Puerto Rico was out for the summer, they joined their father, who let his sons hang around the clubhouse, shag fly balls, and absorb the game—especially from his New York Yankees teammates, such as Thurman Munson
Thurman Munson
and Graig Nettles.[10] Growing up, Alomar idolized both his father and José Cruz.[10][11] Career[edit] San Diego Padres[edit] In 1985, Alomar signed with the San Diego Padres
San Diego Padres
at age 17, and joined the team's Class-A affiliate in Charleston.[7] The following year, playing in Reno, he won the California League
California League
batting championship with a .346 average.[7] Alomar entered the major leagues in 1988 with the Padres, where he was an excellent fielder with speed and a solid bat. Defensively, he displayed excellent lateral range and a powerful arm, often making spectacular plays on ground balls hit deep in the hole between first and second base, and on balls hit up the middle well behind second base. He was an All-Star for the first time in 1990, as a reserve player for the National League.[7] Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays[edit]

Roberto Alomar's number 12 was retired by the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
in 2011.

Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
is a member of the Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays' Level of Excellence.

On December 5, 1990, Alomar and Joe Carter
Joe Carter
were traded to the Toronto Blue Jays in exchange for Fred McGriff
Fred McGriff
and Tony Fernández.[12][13] It was in Toronto
Toronto
that he developed into a premier offensive second baseman, combining a .300-plus batting average with above average power and high end speed on the bases. In 1993, Alomar had his best season with the Jays, producing 17 home runs, 93 RBI and 55 stolen bases, while batting .326, third in the league behind teammates John Olerud and Paul Molitor. He was a central figure in Toronto's World Series championships in 1992 and 1993; in Game 6 of the 1992 World Series, he scored the series-winning run on Dave Winfield's two-run double in the 11th inning. Alomar's game-tying, ninth-inning home run against Oakland relief ace Dennis Eckersley, in Game 4 of the 1992 American League
American League
Championship Series, is considered by many as the most important hit in the club's history,[14] as the team's three previous trips to the ALCS had ended in disappointment; he was named the Most Valuable Player of the series.[7] In each of his five seasons with the Blue Jays, Alomar was on the All-Star team and won the Gold Glove Award. His .307 career batting average as a Blue Jay is a franchise record, and he was the Blue Jays Player of the Year in 1991, 1992 and 1995.

"I don't think we'd have ever gone to the World Series
World Series
in '92 if he didn't hit that home run off Eckersley in Oakland that day like 4:30 in the afternoon when you could hardly see at the plate [because of the shadows]."

– Pat Gillick, Hall of Famer and former Blue Jays general manager[14]

On March 20, 2008, the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
announced that Alomar would be elevated to the Level of Excellence at Toronto's Rogers Centre, joining such Blue Jay legends as George Bell, Joe Carter, Tony Fernández and Cito Gaston. On April 4, 2008, Alomar's name and number were added to the Level of Excellence, along with team executive Paul Beeston, prior to the 2008 home opener. Alomar and Beeston were presented commissioned portraits at the ceremony. On July 19, 2011, the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
announced that they would retire Alomar's number 12 soon after his official induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
is the first player in Blue Jays franchise history to have this honor, which took place on July 31, 2011.[15] Alomar is the first player to be inducted into the Hall of Fame depicted as a member of the Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays. Baltimore Orioles[edit]

Alomar (left) with Ozzie Guillén
Ozzie Guillén
during spring training, 1998

In 1995, Alomar signed with the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
at a time when Toronto
Toronto
was looking to rebuild, while Baltimore was improving into a pennant-contending team. In Baltimore, Alomar paired with Hall of Famer Cal Ripken, Jr.
Cal Ripken, Jr.
to form a formidable double-play combination. Alomar appeared in the playoffs in 1996 and 1997 for the Orioles, although the Orioles were defeated in the ALCS in both years. Spitting incident[edit] On September 27, 1996, during a game against the Blue Jays, Alomar got into a heated argument over a called third strike with umpire John Hirschbeck and spat in his face. He defended himself by saying Hirschbeck had uttered a racial slur and that Hirschbeck had been bitter since one son had died of ALD and another had been recently diagnosed as well. Upon hearing this public disclosure of his private life, Hirschbeck had to be physically restrained from confronting Alomar in the players' locker room.[16] Alomar was suspended for the first five regular season games in 1997 and donated $50,000 to ALD research. Alomar and Hirschbeck settled their differences publicly and made apologies to each other on April 22, 1997, standing at home plate and shaking hands in front of the crowd before an Orioles game. Cleveland Indians[edit] On November 24, 1998, Alomar signed a 4-year contract with the Cleveland Indians,[13] joining his brother, Sandy Jr. It was in Cleveland that Alomar had two of his finest seasons. In 1999 he hit .323/.422/.533 with 24 HRs, 120 RBI and 37 stolen bases, and in 2001 he batted .336/.415/.541 with 20 HRs, 100 RBI and 30 steals. Cleveland made the playoffs in 1999, losing in the ALDS to the Red Sox; in 2001 they again made the playoffs but lost to Seattle in the ALDS. Alomar finished third in MVP voting in 1999. On the field, Alomar teamed with shortstop Omar Vizquel
Omar Vizquel
to form another decorated middle infield combination. In 2000, with Vizquel committing just three errors all season long, the entire Cleveland infield committed 34 errors—just one more than the record low set by the New York Mets
New York Mets
infield the year before. Vizquel, Alomar and third baseman Travis Fryman each won the Gold Glove Award
Gold Glove Award
that season; the Vizquel-Alomar duo ultimately won three consecutive Gold Gloves together, becoming one of just eight shortstop-second baseman duos to have accomplished this feat in the same year. Alomar was traded to the New York Mets
New York Mets
before the 2002 season for pitcher Billy Traber
Billy Traber
and outfielders Matt Lawton and Alex Escobar. Last years[edit] In 2002, Alomar hit only .266/.331/.376 with 53 RBI and 73 runs scored, while falling apart defensively at second base. The Mets were puzzled by Alomar's mediocre play, which some attributed to his lack of comfort with being under the greater scrutiny of the New York fans and media. However, not even a midseason trade back to the American League to the Chicago White Sox
Chicago White Sox
in 2003 could revive Alomar from his funk. There was more misery ahead with the Arizona Diamondbacks
Arizona Diamondbacks
in 2004, including a two-month disabled stint with a broken right hand. On August 5, Alomar returned to the White Sox, and hit just .263/.321/.392 in 56 games. Alomar agreed to a one-year contract with the Tampa Bay Devil Rays
Tampa Bay Devil Rays
for the 2005 season. However, on March 19, 2005, after a spring plagued by back and vision trouble, he decided to retire. In a 17-year career, Alomar was a .300/.371/.443 hitter, with 210 home runs and 1,134 RBI in 2,379 games. At the time of his retirement, he was 51st all-time with 2,724 career hits. Defensively, Alomar posted a .984 fielding percentage at second base. He led the American League
American League
in fielding percentage 4 times, in 1992, 1995, 1999, and 2001. Hall of Fame induction[edit]

A ceremony in Toronto
Toronto
on July 31, 2011 honouring Alomar for his induction into the Hall of Fame

2010 was Alomar's first year of Hall of Fame eligibility, but he missed induction by eight votes. His 73.7% of the vote was the highest percentage of votes in any player's first year on the ballot without being elected. Some baseball writers expressed shock that Alomar failed to get in on the first ballot,[17] but many attributed the near-miss to sportswriters holding a grudge over the 1996 spitting incident with John Hirschbeck, including Alomar's brother Sandy and Hirschbeck himself.[18] Alomar was elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in his second year of eligibility with 90% of the vote (523 of 581 ballots cast).[19] He is the third Puerto Rican in the Hall of Fame, after Roberto Clemente
Roberto Clemente
and Orlando Cepeda. On July 24, 2011, Alomar was formally inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
in Cooperstown, New York
Cooperstown, New York
as a member of the Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays. On June 19, 2010, Alomar was inducted into the Canadian Baseball Hall of Fame in St. Marys, Ontario.[20] The 2011 Caribbean Series
2011 Caribbean Series
was dedicated to him, which was followed by his induction into the Caribbean Baseball Hall of Fame.[21] Despite his number already being placed on the Blue Jays Level of Excellence, on July 31, 2011, the Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
officially retired Alomar's #12 as the first retired number in franchise history. On September 24, 2015, Alomar was inducted into the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in Toronto.[22] Personal life[edit] Alomar married Puerto Rican model Maripily Rivera
Maripily Rivera
on June 1, 2009. The next year, Rivera alleged that she had been victim of aggression from Alomar and that she wanted to end the marriage. Alomar alleged that Rivera had threatened to divorce him unless he gave her half ownership of his Tampa residence.[23] The divorce was finalized on July 12, 2011 with a private settlement.[24][25] On December 12, 2012, Alomar married Toronto
Toronto
native Kim Perks at the Art Gallery of Ontario.[26] Their first daughter was born in 2014.[27] Alomar resides in Toronto.[28] Career milestones[edit] Alomar established several milestones for a second baseman, including 12 straight All-Star appearances (1990–2001), and a record 10 Gold Gloves at the position (1991–96, 1998–2001). He also:

batted over .300 nine times (1992–97, 1999–2001) posted an on-base percentage over .400 five times (1992–93, 1996, 1999, 2001) scored 100 or more runs six times (1992–93, 1996, 1999–2001) drove in 100 or more runs twice (1999, 2001) stole 30 or more bases eight times (1989, 1991–93, 1995, 1999–2001) won four Silver Slugger awards (1992, 1996, 1999–2000) was inducted into the Hall of Fame[29]

Awards[edit]

ALCS MVP
ALCS MVP
(1992) 12× MLB All-Star MLB All-Star Game MVP (1998) 10× Rawlings Gold Glove Award
Gold Glove Award
at second base 4× Silver Slugger Award
Silver Slugger Award
at second base

See also[edit]

Biography portal Baseball portal Puerto Rico portal

Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
award winners and league leaders List of Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
awards List of Gold Glove middle infield duos List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
annual runs scored leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career doubles leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career hits leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career home run leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career runs scored leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career runs batted in leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career plate appearance leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career putouts as a second baseman leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career stolen bases leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
players from Puerto Rico List of Puerto Ricans List of second-generation Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
players List of Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
home run leaders Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
award winners and league leaders

References[edit]

^ a b Porter, David L. (2004). Latino and African American athletes today: a biographical dictionary. Greenwood Publishing Group. p. 20. ISBN 978-0-313-32048-4. Retrieved April 13, 2010.  ^ "12-time All-Star retires; has back, vision problems". ESPN. ESPN Internet Ventures. Associated Press. March 19, 2005. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.  ^ Namee, Matthew (June 28, 2004). "Roberto Alomar: A Forgotten Legend?". The Hardball Times. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.  ^ " Silver Slugger Award
Silver Slugger Award
Winners – National League". Baseball-Reference.com. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.  ^ Kepner, Tyler (January 5, 2011). " Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
and Bert Blyleven Elected to Hall of Fame". The New York Times.  ^ Blue Jays to retire Alomar's jersey Retrieved 12-07-2012 ^ a b c d e Britton, John A (2002) [1992]. Dawson, Dawn P, ed. Great Athletes. 1 (Revised ed.). Salem Press. pp. 49–51. ISBN 1-58765-008-8.  ^ Van Hyning, Thomas E.; Eduardo Valero (2004). Puerto Rico's Winter League: A History of Major League Baseball's Launching Pad. McFarland. p. 111. ISBN 978-0-7864-1970-8. Retrieved April 13, 2010.  ^ " Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
Biography". www.bookrags.com.  ^ a b Lubinger, Bill (July 19, 2011). "Roberto Alomar's long route to Cooperstown glory ran through Cleveland". Cleveland.com. Retrieved August 5, 2013.  ^ Kepner, Tyler (January 4, 2010). " Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
Awaits the Hall's Call". The New York Times. Retrieved August 5, 2013.  ^ Wolpin, Stewart; Robinson, James G. "Roberto Alomar". BaseballLibrary.com. Idea Logical Company. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.  ^ a b " Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
from the Chronology". BaseballLibrary.com. Idea Logical Company. Archived from the original on May 23, 2009. Retrieved May 23, 2009.  ^ a b Gillick, Alomar fittingly enter Hall together MLB.com. Accessed on February 24, 2012. ^ "Blue Jays to retire Alomar's No. 12". The Toronto
Toronto
Star. Archived from the original on April 26, 2016. Retrieved July 20, 2011.  ^ Wulf, Steve (June 24, 2001). "The Spit Hits The Fan". Time Magazine. Retrieved July 9, 2009.  ^ Rosenthal, Ken (January 8, 2010). "Snub of Alomar exposes flaw in voting". Fox Sports. Retrieved August 12, 2011.  ^ "Eight votes shy, Alomar 'disappointed'". Major League Baseball.  ^ "News - 2010 BBWAA Election Results". community.baseballhall.org.  ^ nurun.com. "Alomar, Quantrill inducted in Hall of Fame". The London Free Press.  ^ Ribas, Fernando (January 26, 2011). "Dedican Serie del Caribe a Roberto Alomar". El Nuevo Dia
El Nuevo Dia
(in Spanish). El Nuevo Dia. Retrieved January 26, 2011.  ^ "Roberto Alomar".  ^ Fish, Mike (December 1, 2012). "Drama follows retired baseball All-Star". ESPN.  ^ Vargas, Patricia (July 12, 2011). "Maripily divorciada y millonaria". El Nuevo Día.  ^ Gómez, María Gabriela (July 12, 2011). "Maripily ya esta divorciada". Primera Hora.  ^ Elliott, Bob (December 12, 2012). "Hall of Famer Roberto Alomar marries in Toronto
Toronto
on 12-12-12". Toronto
Toronto
Sun.  ^ "Se convierte en padre Roberto Alomar". El Nuevo Día. April 11, 2014. Retrieved April 12, 2014.  ^ Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
impressed by Jose Reyes SLAM! Sports. Accessed on June 20, 2013. ^ Torres, Adry (July 24, 2011). " Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
Enters Hall of Fame". 

External links[edit]

Official website Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors) Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
Career Biography and Statistics The Baseball Page Career Biography and Statistics

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Baseball Hall of Fame
Baseball Hall of Fame
Class of 2011

BBWAA Vote

Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
(90.0%) Bert Blyleven
Bert Blyleven
(79.7%)

Veterans Committee

Pat Gillick

J. G. Taylor Spink Award

Bill Conlin

Ford C. Frick Award

Dave Van Horne

Buck O'Neil Lifetime Achievement Award

Roland Hemond

v t e

Members of the National Baseball Hall of Fame

Pitchers

Alexander Bender Blyleven M. Brown R. Brown Bunning Carlton Chesbro Clarkson Cooper Coveleski Cummings Day Dean Dihigo Drysdale Eckersley Faber Feller Fingers Ford B. Foster Galvin B. Gibson Glavine Gomez Gossage Grimes Grove Haines Hoffman Hoyt Hubbell Hunter Jenkins R. Johnson W. Johnson Joss Keefe Koufax Lemon Lyons Maddux Marichal Marquard Martínez Mathewson McGinnity Méndez Morris Newhouser Nichols Niekro Paige Palmer Pennock Perry Plank Radbourn Rixey Roberts Rogan Ruffing Rusie Ryan Seaver H. Smith Smoltz Spahn Sutter Sutton Vance Waddell Walsh Welch Wilhelm J. Williams Willis Wynn Young

Catchers

Bench Berra Bresnahan Campanella Carter Cochrane Dickey Ewing Ferrell Fisk J. Gibson Hartnett Lombardi Mackey Piazza Rodríguez Santop Schalk

First basemen

Anson Bagwell Beckley Bottomley Brouthers Cepeda Chance Connor Foxx Gehrig Greenberg G. Kelly Killebrew Leonard McCovey Mize Murray Pérez Sisler Suttles Taylor Terry Thomas Thome

Second basemen

Alomar Biggio Carew E. Collins Doerr Evers Fox Frisch Gehringer Gordon Grant Herman Hornsby Lajoie Lazzeri Mazeroski McPhee Morgan J. Robinson Sandberg Schoendienst

Third basemen

Baker Boggs Brett J. Collins Dandridge J. Johnson Jones Kell Lindstrom Mathews Molitor B. Robinson Santo Schmidt Traynor J. Wilson D. White

Shortstops

Aparicio Appling Bancroft Banks Boudreau Cronin Davis T. Jackson Jennings Larkin Lloyd Maranville Reese Ripken Jr. Rizzuto Sewell O. Smith Tinker Trammell Vaughan Wagner Wallace Ward Wells Yount

Outfielders

Aaron Ashburn Averill Bell Brock W. Brown Burkett Carey Charleston Clarke Clemente Cobb Combs Crawford Cuyler Dawson Delahanty DiMaggio Doby Duffy Flick Goslin Griffey Jr. Guerrero Gwynn Hafey Hamilton Heilmann Henderson Hill Hooper Irvin R. Jackson Kaline Keeler Kelley K. Kelly Kiner Klein Mantle Manush Mays T. McCarthy Medwick Musial O'Rourke Ott Puckett Raines J. Rice S. Rice F. Robinson Roush Ruth Simmons Slaughter Snider Speaker Stargell Stearnes Thompson Torriente L. Waner P. Waner Wheat B. Williams T. Williams H. Wilson Winfield Yastrzemski Youngs

Managers

Alston Anderson Cox Durocher Hanlon Harris Herzog Huggins La Russa Lasorda López Mack J. McCarthy McGraw McKechnie W. Robinson Selee Southworth Stengel Torre Weaver D. Williams

Executives / pioneers

Barrow Bulkeley Cartwright Chadwick Chandler Comiskey Dreyfuss R. Foster Frick Giles Gillick Griffith Harridge Hulbert B. Johnson Kuhn Landis La. MacPhail Le. MacPhail Manley O'Malley Pompez Posey Rickey Ruppert Schuerholz Selig Spalding Veeck Weiss S. White Wilkinson G. Wright H. Wright Yawkey

Umpires

Barlick Chylak Conlan Connolly Evans Harvey Hubbard Klem McGowan O'Day

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American League
American League
Second Baseman Silver Slugger Award

1980: Randolph 1981: Grich 1982: García 1983: Whitaker 1984: Whitaker 1985: Whitaker 1986: White 1987: Whitaker 1988: Franco 1989: Franco 1990: Franco 1991: Franco 1992: Alomar 1993: Baerga 1994: Baerga 1995: Knoblauch 1996: Alomar 1997: Knoblauch 1998: Easley 1999: Alomar 2000: Alomar 2001: Boone 2002: Soriano 2003: Boone 2004: Soriano 2005: Soriano 2006: Canó 2007: Polanco 2008: Pedroia 2009 Hill 2010: Canó 2011: Canó 2012: Canó 2013: Canó 2014: Altuve 2015: Altuve 2016: Altuve 2017: Altuve

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American League
American League
Second Baseman Gold Glove Award

1958: Bolling 1959: Fox 1960: Fox 1961: Richardson 1962: Richardson 1963: Richardson 1964: Richardson 1965: Richardson 1966: Knoop 1967: Knoop 1968: Knoop 1969: Johnson 1970: Johnson 1971: Johnson 1972: Griffin 1973: Grich 1974: Grich 1975: Grich 1976: Grich 1977: White 1978: White 1979: White 1980: White 1981: White 1982: White 1983: Whitaker 1984: Whitaker 1985: Whitaker 1986: White 1987: White 1988: Reynolds 1989: Reynolds 1990: Reynolds 1991: Alomar 1992: Alomar 1993: Alomar 1994: Alomar 1995: Alomar 1996: Alomar 1997: Knoblauch 1998: Alomar 1999: Alomar 2000: Alomar 2001: Alomar 2002: Boone 2003: Boone 2004: Boone 2005: Hudson 2006: Grudzielanek 2007: Polanco 2008: Pedroia 2009: Polanco 2010: Canó 2011: Pedroia 2012: Canó 2013: Pedroia 2014: Pedroia 2015: Altuve 2016: Kinsler 2017: Dozier

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American League Championship Series MVP Award

1980: White 1981: Nettles 1982: Lynn 1983: Boddicker 1984: Gibson 1985: Brett 1986: Barrett 1987: Gaetti 1988: Eckersley 1989: Henderson 1990: Stewart 1991: Puckett 1992: Alomar 1993: Stewart 1994: Series Not Played 1995: Hershiser 1996: Williams 1997: Grissom 1998: Wells 1999: Hernández 2000: Justice 2001: Pettitte 2002: Kennedy 2003: Rivera 2004: Ortiz 2005: Konerko 2006: Polanco 2007: Beckett 2008: Garza 2009: Sabathia 2010: Hamilton 2011: Cruz 2012: Young 2013: Uehara 2014: Cain 2015: Escobar 2016: Miller 2017: Verlander

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Major League Baseball All-Star Game
Major League Baseball All-Star Game
MVP Award

1962: Wills 1962: Wagner 1963: Mays 1964: Callison 1965: Marichal 1966: B. Robinson 1967: Pérez 1968: Mays 1969: McCovey 1970: Yastrzemski 1971: F. Robinson 1972: Morgan 1973: Bonds 1974: Garvey 1975: Madlock & Matlack 1976: Foster 1977: Sutton 1978: Garvey 1979: Parker 1980: Griffey Sr. 1981: Carter 1982: Concepción 1983: Lynn 1984: Carter 1985: Hoyt 1986: Clemens 1987: Raines 1988: Steinbach 1989: Jackson 1990: Franco 1991: Ripken Jr. 1992: Griffey Jr. 1993: Puckett 1994: McGriff 1995: Conine 1996: Piazza 1997: Alomar Jr. 1998: Alomar 1999: Martínez 2000: Jeter 2001: Ripken Jr. 2003: Anderson 2004: Soriano 2005: Tejada 2006: Young 2007: Suzuki 2008: Drew 2009: Crawford 2010: McCann 2011: Fielder 2012: Cabrera 2013: Rivera 2014: Trout 2015: Trout 2016: Hosmer 2017: Canó

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Toronto
Toronto
Blue Jays

Based in Toronto, Ontario

Franchise

History Expansion

Expansion draft

Seasons Records No-hitters First-round picks Award winners and league leaders Home run
Home run
leaders Roster Players Minor league players Managers Owners and executives Broadcasters

Radio network

Opening Day starting pitchers

Ballparks

Exhibition Stadium Rogers Centre Spring training: Grant Field Dunedin Stadium Cecil P. Englebert Complex

Culture

Continental League Mascots (BJ Birdy Ace) "OK Blue Jays" Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
on TSN Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
on Sportsnet

Lore

1991 All-Star Game Touch 'em all Joe The Bat Flip (reactions)

Rivalries

Montreal Expos (defunct)

Retired numbers

12 32 42

Key personnel

Owner: Rogers Communications President & CEO: Mark Shapiro General manager: Ross Atkins Manager: John Gibbons

World Series
World Series
championships (2)

1992 1993

American League
American League
pennants (2)

1992 1993

Division titles (6)

1985 1989 1991 1992 1993 2015

Wild Card berths (1)

2016

Minor league affiliates

AAA

Buffalo Bisons

AA

New Hampshire Fisher Cats

A Adv.

Dunedin Blue Jays

A

Lansing Lugnuts

Short A

Vancouver Canadians

Rookie Adv.

Bluefield Blue Jays

Rookie

GCL Blue Jays DSL Blue Jays

Seasons (41)

1970s

1970 · 1971 · 1972 · 1973 · 1974 · 1975 · 1976 · 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

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Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
1992 World Series
World Series
champions

2 Manuel Lee 4 Alfredo Griffin 9 John Olerud 10 Pat Borders
Pat Borders
( World Series
World Series
MVP) 11 David Cone 12 Roberto Alomar
Roberto Alomar
(ALCS MVP) 14 Derek Bell 15 Pat Tabler 17 Kelly Gruber 22 Jimmy Key 23 Candy Maldonado 24 Turner Ward 25 Devon White 29 Joe Carter 30 Todd Stottlemyre 31 Duane Ward 32 Dave Winfield 33 Ed Sprague 36 David Wells 40 Mike Timlin 47 Jack Morris 48 Mark Eichhorn 50 Tom Henke 66 Juan Guzmán

Manager 43 Cito Gaston

Coaches First Base Coach 3 Bob Bailor Third Base Coach 7 Rich Hacker Bullpen Coach 8 John Sullivan Bench Coach 18 Gene Tenace Hitting Coach 39 Larry Hisle Pitching Coach 42 Galen Cisco

Regular season American League
American League
Championship Series

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Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
1993 World Series
World Series
champions

1 Tony Fernández 2 Rob Butler 4 Alfredo Griffin 9 John Olerud 10 Pat Borders 12 Roberto Alomar 16 Turner Ward 19 Paul Molitor
Paul Molitor
( World Series
World Series
MVP) 21 Willie Cañate 24 Rickey Henderson 25 Devon White 27 Randy Knorr 28 Al Leiter 29 Joe Carter 30 Todd Stottlemyre 31 Duane Ward 33 Ed Sprague 34 Dave Stewart (ALCS MVP) 40 Mike Timlin 41 Pat Hentgen 44 Scott Brow 47 Jack Morris 48 Mark Eichhorn 49 Tony Castillo 50 Danny Cox 66 Juan Guzmán

Manager 43 Cito Gaston

Coaches First Base Coach 3 Bob Bailor Third Base Coach (1) 7 Rich Hacker Bullpen Coach 8 John Sullivan Bench Coach 18 Gene Tenace Hitting Coach 39 Larry Hisle Pitching Coach 42 Galen Cisco Third Base Coach (2) 45 Nick Leyva

Regular season American League
American League
Championship Series

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Toronto Blue Jays
Toronto Blue Jays
Level of Excellence

12 Roberto Alomar Paul Beeston George Bell Joe Carter 4306 Tom Cheek Carlos Delgado Tony Fernández Cito Gaston Pat Gillick 32 Roy Halladay Dave Stieb

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Members of the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
Hall of Fame

Roberto Alomar Brady Anderson Luis Aparicio Harold Baines George Bamberger Steve Barber Hank Bauer Mark Belanger Paul Blair Mike Boddicker Mike Bordick Hal Brown Don Buford Al Bumbry Mike Cuellar Rich Dauer Doug DeCinces Rick Dempsey Jack Dunn III Mike Flanagan Jim Gentile Bobby Grich Dick Hall Elrod Hendricks Chris Hoiles Billy Hunter Davey Johnson John Lowenstein Dennis Martínez Tippy Martinez Lee May Scott McGregor Dave McNally Ray Miller Stu Miller Melvin Mora Eddie Murray Mike Mussina Johnny Oates Gregg Olson Jim Palmer Milt Pappas Boog Powell Paul Richards Cal Ripken Jr. Cal Ripken Sr. Brooks Robinson Frank Robinson Gary Roenicke Ken Singleton B. J. Surhoff Gus Triandos Eddie Watt Earl Weaver Hoyt Wilhelm Gene Woodling

Herb Armstrong Award

Richie Bancells Rex Barney Rob Brown Frank Cashen Harry Dalton Jerold Hoffberger Phil Itzoe Lenny Johnston Lee MacPhail Bill O'Donnell Hank Peters Don Pries Ralph Salvon Chuck Thompson Ernie Tyler Fred Uhlman Sr. Julie Wagner Eddie Weidner

"Wild Bill" Hagy Award

Wild Bill Hagy

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 105153005 LCCN: n95076

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