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The Roadmap for peace or road map for peace (Hebrew: מפת הדרכיםMapa had'rakhim, Arabic: خارطة طريق السلامKhāriṭa ṭarīq as-salāmu) was a plan to resolve the Israeli–Palestinian conflict proposed by the Quartet on the Middle East: the United States, the European Union, Russia and the United Nations. The principles of the plan, originally drafted by U.S. Foreign Service Officer Donald Blome, were first outlined by U.S. President George W. Bush in a speech on 24 June 2002, in which he called for an independent Palestinian state living side by side with Israel in peace.[1][2] A draft version from the Bush administration was published as early as 14 November 2002. The final text was released on 30 April 2003. The process reached a deadlock early in phase I and the plan was never implemented.

Palestinian Prime Minister Mahmoud Abbas, United States President George W. Bush, and Israeli Prime Minister Ariel Sharon after reading statement to the press during the closing moments of the Red Sea Summit in Aqaba, Jordan, June 4, 2003.

Background

The Second Intifada, which started in September 2000, showed an escalation of mutual violence. In March 2002, in response to a wave of suicide attacks, culminating in the "Passover massacre", Israel launched a major military operation in the West Bank, dubbed Operation Defensive Shield.[3] Virtually the complete Palestinian public administration was destroyed by the Israeli army.The Second Intifada, which started in September 2000, showed an escalation of mutual violence. In March 2002, in response to a wave of suicide attacks, culminating in the "Passover massacre", Israel launched a major military operation in the West Bank, dubbed Operation Defensive Shield.[3] Virtually the complete Palestinian public administration was destroyed by the Israeli army.[4][5] Israel re-established its full exclusive military control over the West Bank, including the Areas A and B, which were destined to be handed over to the Palestinian Authority in the framework of the Oslo II Accord. The army largely destroyed Arafat's Compound in Ramallah, with the main offices of the PA, and placed President Yasser Arafat under siege.

US, EU, UN and Russia, who became the Quartet on the Middle East, tried to save the "peace process" with a new plan. This happened against the background of George W. Bush's War on Terror, which started after the 11 September 2001 attacks and dominated the international politics.

Development of the plan