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Rafael Palmeiro
Rafael Palmeiro
Corrales (born September 24, 1964) is a retired Cuban American Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
first baseman and left fielder. Palmeiro was an All-American at Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University
before being drafted by the Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
in 1985. He played for the Cubs (1986–1988), Texas Rangers (1989–1993, 1999–2003), and the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(1994–1998, 2004–2005). He was named to the MLB All-Star Team four times, and won the Gold Glove three times. He is a member of the 500 home run club
500 home run club
and the 3,000 hit club
3,000 hit club
and is one of only five players in history to be a member of both. Days after recording his 3,000th hit, Palmeiro was suspended for testing positive for an anabolic steroid.

Contents

1 Early life 2 College 3 Major league career

3.1 Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
(1986–1988) 3.2 Texas Rangers (1989–1993) 3.3 Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(1994–1998) 3.4 Texas Rangers (1999–2003) 3.5 Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(2004–2005) 3.6 Coming out of retirement (2018)

4 Independent league career (2015)

4.1 Sugar Land Skeeters

5 Notable achievements 6 Post-career honors 7 Steroids 8 Personal life 9 See also 10 References 11 External links

Early life[edit] Palmeiro was born in Havana, Cuba
Havana, Cuba
and graduated from Miami Jackson High School in Miami, Florida. Although he was drafted by the New York Mets in the 8th round of the 1982 draft, he did not sign. College[edit] Palmeiro was recruited by Ron Polk
Ron Polk
and enrolled at Mississippi State University, where he played college baseball for the Bulldogs in the Southeastern Conference
Southeastern Conference
(SEC). He was the first of two players to have ever won the SEC triple crown, both of whom are Mississippi State products. A teammate of Will Clark, the two were known as "Thunder and Lightning".[1] Clark and Palmeiro were known to dislike each other, dating back to their time at Mississippi State.[2] On June 11, 1985, Palmeiro signed with the Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
as the 22nd pick in the 1st round of the 1985 draft.[3] Major league career[edit] Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
(1986–1988)[edit] Palmeiro debuted on September 8, 1986 in a game between the Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies
Philadelphia Phillies
at Wrigley Field, as a left fielder.[4] In his first season, he played 22 games, having a .247 batting average while having 12 RBIs and 3 home runs. In the next season, he played in 84 games, garnering 61 hits, 14 home runs and 30 RBIs with a .276 average. During his tenure with the Cubs, he normally played left field, though occasionally he would play other outfield positions or first base. Palmeiro was the runner up to National League
National League
batting champion Tony Gwynn
Tony Gwynn
in 1988 with a .307 batting average, only six points below Gwynn's. He had 178 hits, 8 home runs and 53 RBIs in 629 plate appearances and 152 games. He was named to the 1988 MLB All-Star Game, the first in his career. During that year rumors spread about a relationship between Palmeiro and Ryne Sandberg's wife, Cindy. This led to issues in the locker room and after the 1988 season, Palmeiro was traded by the Cubs to the Texas Rangers along with Jamie Moyer
Jamie Moyer
and Drew Hall in exchange for Mitch Williams, Paul Kilgus, Steve Wilson, Curtis Wilkerson, Luis Benitez, and Pablo Delgado. Texas Rangers (1989–1993)[edit]

Palmeiro in a Spring training game for the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
against the Boston Red Sox, 2005.

Upon moving to the American League, Palmeiro was primarily used as a first baseman or designated hitter. Palmeiro blossomed as a hitter while with the Rangers, leading the league in hits in 1990 and doubles in 1991. In 1989, he hit for .275 that season, having 64 RBIs, 8 home runs and 154 hits. In 1990, he was third in the American League
American League
in batting. He hit for .319 during the season, while having 89 RBIs and 14 home runs and leading the league in hits. He hit 49 doubles in 1991 (a season high along with career high), while having 203 hits, 26 home runs and 88 RBIs for a .322 batting average. He was named to his second career All-Star Game that year. He dipped in every category in 1992, having 163 hits, 22 home runs, 85 RBIs and a .268 batting average. He bounced back the following year (a contract season), having a career high 124 runs, 176 hits, a career high 37 home runs along with 105 RBIs and a .295 batting average. He was offered a five-year contract worth $26 million after the season. Despite that fact, he left the Rangers for the Orioles after they signed ex- Mississippi State teammate Will Clark. Instead of getting a better deal, they signed Will Clark
Will Clark
instead (for $30 million and five years), causing Palmeiro to call him a "low life", though he later apologized for saying that.[5] Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(1994–1998)[edit] Palmeiro signed a 5-year contract, worth more than $30,000,000.[6] In his first season as an Oriole, Palmeiro hit 23 home runs, a season that was abbreviated due to a work stoppage. He had 76 RBIs (the last time he would have less than 100 RBIs until 2004) along with a .319 batting average. Prior to Palmeiro's 1995 season, he had hit more than 30 home runs only once (37 in 1993). Starting in 1995, Palmeiro began a streak of 38+ home run years that continued through the 2003 season. He hit 373 home runs during this nine-season span, while also driving in over 100 runs in each of these seasons. However, Palmeiro never led the league in home runs, and he is history's most prolific home run hitter to have never won the home run crown. That season, he led the team in home runs, batting average, and runs batted in. In the 1996 season, he hit 39 home runs, 181 hits, and 142 runs batted in and helped the Orioles qualify for the American League Wild Card. This was both his first postseason appearance in his career along with the first postseason appearance for the Orioles since 1983. In his first postseason, he had seven total hits, six RBIs and a combined .205 average while playing in all nine games the Orioles played, as they beat the Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
in the 1996 American League Division Series to advance to the 1996 American League
American League
Championship Series before being beat by the New York Yankees. He finished 6th in MVP balloting, his highest finish up to that point in his career. Despite having 109 strikeouts (a career high) and a .254 batting average, he had 110 RBIs, 156 hits along with 38 home runs in 1997 as he helped the team win their division for the first time since 1983. He also was awarded the Rawlings Gold Glove Award
Gold Glove Award
that season, his first ever. In the 1997 American League
American League
Division Series, the Orioles beat the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
in four games. In the postseason, he had 10 combined hits along with 2 RBIs and 1 home run and a .265 average in the 10 games he played in the postseason, as the Orioles once again advanced to the ALCS after beating the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
before losing to the Indians in six games. This would be the last time the Orioles would make the playoffs until 2012 and last time they would win a division title until 2014. The next season, his last with his first stint with the Orioles, he hit 43 home runs, to lead the team for the 4th time. He had 183 hits along with 121 RBIs and a .296 batting average. He was named to the 1998 MLB All-Star Game, his first since 1991. He also won a Golden Glove for the second straight year along with his first Silver Slugger Award, while finishing 18th in MVP balloting. In his time with the Orioles, he received MVP votes each year, though he never finished higher than 6th. Texas Rangers (1999–2003)[edit] Palmeiro was offered a 5-year, $50,000,000 deal to stay with the Orioles, but instead agreed to a 5-year, $45,000,000 contract to return to the Rangers in 1999, citing a desire to be close to family (he had remained in the Dallas area during his time with the Orioles). [7] Palmerio played an average of 157 games per season in his second tenure with the Rangers. He had 47 home runs in his first season back with the Rangers, while hitting for .324 and having 183 hits. He finished 5th in the MVP balloting, his highest finish ever while being named to the 1999 MLB All-Star Game, his fourth and final selection. He was awarded the Golden Glove for the third straight year along with winning the Silver Slugger Award
Silver Slugger Award
for his second straight and final year. The Golden Glove win was not without controversy, as he only appearaed in 28 games as a first baseman while playing in compared to 128 games as the designated hitter.[8][9][10] He finished 5th in the MVP balloting, having garnered a .324 batting average, 47 home runs, and 148 RBIs, all improvements from the previous season. He hit over 100 RBIs in each of his five seasons, along with 805 hits. He hit 214 home runs with the team in that span, though his batting average dipped each year, hitting .260 in his final year in 2003. His first season resulted in a division title. In the 1999 American League Division Series, his team was swept by the Yankees in three games. He had three hits and a .273 average for the series. This was his last postseason appearance. The team would finish last place in his remaining four seasons. Palmeiro was one of the few bright spots for the Rangers from 2000–2003, when he left the Rangers to re-join the Orioles. On May 11, 2003, Palmeiro hit his 500th home run off David Elder in a game against the Cleveland Indians. [11] In 10 total years with the team, he played in 1,573 games, garnering 1,692 hits, 321 home runs and 1,039 RBIs while compiling a .290 batting average. Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
(2004–2005)[edit] Palmeiro re-signed with the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
in 2004, on a 1-year, $4,000,000 contract. In his press conference, he claimed he was "a little bit older, a little bit wiser". He also said he didn't want to retire until he rejoined the Orioles and if he was inducted to the Hall of Fame, he would do so as an Oriole. His power fell significantly his first season back with the Orioles, having 142 hits, along with 23 home runs, 88 RBIs and a .258 batting average, all drops from the previous season. Despite this, he became one of only four players (the other three being Ken Griffey Jr, Mark McGwire, and Manny Ramírez) in history to hit at least 200 home runs for two different clubs, doing so on September 13, 2004 off Justin Miller.[12] Entering 2005, he was just 78 hits shy of 3,000. He hit his 563rd home run that season, passing Reggie Jackson
Reggie Jackson
on the all-time list. Just a few weeks later, on July 15, Palmeiro joined Hank Aaron, Willie Mays, Alex Rodriguez, and Eddie Murray
Eddie Murray
as the only players in major league history to get 3,000 hits and 500 home runs.[13] Not long after his achievement, Palmeiro was suspended 10 days for testing positive for steroids. [14] He claimed he received a tainted vitamin b12 shot from Miguel Tejada. Upon returning, he only played a few more games. He was booed by the home fans. He was sent home due to a nagging injury, but was told to stay home – largely because of his attempt to implicate his teammate.[15] As of April 2016, he has yet to return to Baltimore.[16] In his final season, he had 98 hits, 18 home runs, 60 RBIs and a .266 batting average in 110 total games played. Coming out of retirement (2018)[edit] Palmeiro announced on January 5, 2018 that he wants to return to Major League Baseball. Independent league career (2015)[edit] Sugar Land Skeeters[edit] On September 17, 2015, it was announced that Palmeiro would sign with the Sugar Land Skeeters
Sugar Land Skeeters
of the Atlantic League of Professional Baseball to play alongside his son, Patrick Palmeiro.[17] He started for the first time for the Skeeters on September 18, 2015. Skeeter fans quickly gave him the nickname "The Saccharin Slugger."[18] Notable achievements[edit] Palmeiro played in 2,831 major league games, the most by any player who never played in the World Series. Palmeiro won three straight Gold Glove awards as a first baseman in the American League
American League
from 1997–1999. In 1999 he only played 28 games at first base. Post-career honors[edit] Palmeiro was inducted into the Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University
Hall of Fame on October 11, 2008.[19] In 2009, he was inducted into the National College Baseball Hall of Fame.[20] In 2012 Rafael Palmeiro was inducted into the Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame.[21] Palmeiro became eligible for induction into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2011. He received 64 votes, or 11.0 percent of total ballots cast; the threshold for entry is 75 percent. According to Barry M. Bloom on Major League Baseball's official website: "Palmeiro should have been a sure-fire first-ballot inductee, as a member of the 500-homer, 3,000-hit club, but was suspended in 2005 after testing positive for steroid use. He received only 11 percent of the vote.".[22] On January 8, 2014, Palmeiro received insufficient support to remain on the HOF ballot in future years, when he received only 25, or 4.4% of votes.[23] Steroids[edit] Former Rangers teammate José Canseco
José Canseco
identified Palmeiro as a fellow steroid user in his 2005 book, Juiced: Wild Times, Rampant 'Roids, Smash Hits & How Baseball Got Big, and claimed he personally injected Palmeiro with steroids. On March 17, 2005, Palmeiro appeared at a Congressional hearing about steroids in baseball and, while under oath, denied ever using steroids and stated, "Let me start by telling you this: I have never used steroids, period. I don't know how to say it any more clearly than that. Never."[24] On August 1, 2005, Palmeiro was suspended for ten days after testing positive for a steroid.[25] The Washington Post
Washington Post
reported that the steroid detected in Palmeiro's system was a "serious" one.[26] According to The New York Times, Palmeiro tested positive for the potent anabolic steroid stanozolol.[27] In a public statement, Palmeiro disclosed that an appeal of the suspension had already been denied. He released a statement saying, "I have never intentionally used steroids. Never. Ever. Period. Ultimately, although I never intentionally put a banned substance into my body, the independent arbitrator ruled that I had to be suspended under the terms of the program."[28] According to Palmeiro, all of his previous tests over the two years including the 2003 sealed test were negative, and a test he took just three weeks after his positive test was also negative.[29] The House Government Reform Committee would not seek perjury charges against Palmeiro, although they were not clearing him.[30] Palmeiro returned to Camden Yards following his 10-day suspension on August 11, 2005, although he did not play in the lineup until August 14. Coincidentally, this was the date that had been planned as "Rafael Palmeiro Appreciation Day" in celebration of his 500-home run, 3,000-hit milestone. It was canceled after Palmeiro's suspension.[31] The Baltimore Sun
The Baltimore Sun
reported that Palmeiro never offered an explanation for his positive test to the MLB arbitration panel, which ran contrary to his public statements.[32] ESPN
ESPN
later reported that Palmeiro implicated Miguel Tejada
Miguel Tejada
to baseball's arbitration panel, suggesting a supplement provided to him by Tejada was responsible for his positive test. This supplement was supposedly vitamin B12, though it could have been tainted.[33] Tejada and two unnamed teammates provided B12 samples to the panel, which did not contain stanozolol. However, the committee did say they found "substantial inconsistencies between Mr. Tejada's accounts and the accounts of players A and B."[34] Tejada, who said he received shipments of B12 from the Dominican Republic, was later implicated for steroid use in the Mitchell Report.[35] Palmeiro continues to strongly deny ever having used steroids intentionally, telling The Baltimore Sun
The Baltimore Sun
in June 2006, "Yes sir, that's what happened. It's not a story; it's the reality of what happened", and "I said what I said before Congress because I meant every word of it."[36] Palmeiro passed a polygraph test in which he was not asked if he ever used steroids, but in which he did state that he unknowingly ingested them via a B12 injection.[34][37] A 2005 New York Times article expressed one writer's belief that Palmeiro's story could perhaps be the truth.[38] In December 2007, Palmeiro was included in the Mitchell Report in which it was alleged that he used performance-enhancing drugs during his career. The report did not provide any new evidence and only recapped allegations made by José Canseco, Palmeiro's appearance before Congress, and his subsequent failed drug test. The report also details a conversation Larry Bigbie alleges he had with Palmeiro where he claims "Palmeiro asked him about his source of steroids and human growth hormone (the source was Kirk Radomski) and how the substances made him feel." Bigbie also stated that "Palmeiro denied in those conversations that he had ever used performance-enhancing substances himself."[39] On December 20, 2007, Palmeiro was also named in Jason Grimsley's unsealed affidavit as a user of amphetamines prior to their being banned by MLB.[40] Personal life[edit] Palmeiro lives in Colleyville, Texas
Colleyville, Texas
with his wife.[41] His son Preston plays for North Carolina State University and was recently drafted by the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
organization .[42] See also[edit]

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players named in the Mitchell Report List of doping cases in sport

References[edit]

^ Norwood, Andrew (April 29, 2015). "SEC Storied: Thunder & Lightning to Premiere Monday". Maroon and White Nation. FanSided Inc.  ^ Chass, Murray (9 March 1994). "BASEBALL; Thoughts Deep in the Heart of Texas". New York Times. Retrieved 8 October 2014.  ^ "Rafael Palmeiro". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved January 19, 2011.  ^ "Retrosheet Boxscore: Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
7, Philadelphia Phillies 4".  ^ "Palmeiro Apologizes To Clark". tribunedigital-chicagotribune. Retrieved 2016-12-26.  ^ Chass, Murray (1993-12-13). "BASEBALL; Orioles Land Palmeiro For $30 Million, 5 Years". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-12-26.  ^ Chass, Murray (1998-12-02). "BASEBALL; Belle to Orioles, But Palmeiro Heads to Texas". The New York Times. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved 2016-12-26.  ^ 8 Upper by Tom Scocca: Fools' Gold 11/17/1999 Archived 2006-08-31 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Gold Glove Award
Gold Glove Award
BaseballLibrary.com Archived 2009-01-05 at the Wayback Machine. ^ Jeff Sullivan (2 December 2011). "Searching For A Defense Of Rafael Palmeiro's 1999 Gold Glove". SBNation.com. Vox Media.  ^ http://texas.rangers.mlb.com/mlb/events/palmeiro500/index.jsp ^ https://www.baseball-reference.com/boxes/TOR/TOR200409130.shtml ^ Sun, Baltimore. " Rafael Palmeiro
Rafael Palmeiro
through the years". baltimoresun.com. Retrieved 2016-12-26.  ^ "Palmeiro suspended for steroids, denies intentional use". ESPN.com. 2005-08-02. Retrieved 2016-12-26.  ^ "Palmeiro sent home by Orioles Peninsula Clarion". peninsulaclarion.com. Retrieved 2016-12-26.  ^ "The rise and fall of Rafael Palmeiro
Rafael Palmeiro
FOX Sports". FOX Sports. 2016-04-18. Retrieved 2016-12-26.  ^ " Rafael Palmeiro
Rafael Palmeiro
to play for Sugar Land Skeeters
Sugar Land Skeeters
of Atlantic League". ESPN.com.  ^ Wray, Brad (HouWray) September 18, 2016, 9:08. Tweet. ^ " Mississippi State University
Mississippi State University
M-Club Alumni Association & Sports Hall of Fame". HailState.com.  ^ College Baseball Foundation – Hall of Fame Archived 2010-05-28 at the Wayback Machine. ^ "Rafael Corrales Palmeiro". Mississippi Sports Hall of Fame and Museum.  ^ Bloom, Barry (2010-01-05). "Cooperstown calls for Alomar, Blyleven". MLB.com. Retrieved 2011-01-05.  ^ 2014 Hall of Fame Voting. Baseball-Reference.com. ^ "Palmeiro docked 10 days for steroids". ESPN.com.  ^ "Players suspended under baseball's steroids policy". espn.com. 2006-06-07. Retrieved 2007-07-20.  ^ Arangure, Jr., Jorge (August 2, 2005). "Palmeiro Suspended For Steroid Violation". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 22, 2010.  ^ Chass, Murray (December 28, 2005). "Palmeiro Cites His Own Naïveté and Ponders Mystery of It All". The New York Times. Retrieved May 22, 2010.  ^ WLTX.com Sports[dead link] ^ Baseball: Palmeiro weighs unknowns International Herald Tribune ^ "Congress won't charge Palmeiro with perjury". ESPN.com.  ^ Boyd, Flinder (17 Mar 2017). "The rise and fall of Rafael Palmeiro". Retrieved 6 May 2017.  ^ Baltimore Sun (19 August 2005). "Palmeiro provided no details about test". baltimoresun.com.  ^ "Source: Palmeiro named Tejada before panel". ESPN.com.  ^ a b Arangure, Jr., Jorge (November 11, 2005). "Congress Declines to Prosecute Palmeiro for Perjury". The Washington Post. Retrieved May 22, 2010.  ^ " Miguel Tejada
Miguel Tejada
excerpt from Mitchell Report". Houston Chronicle.  ^ Baltimore Sun (30 June 2006). "Palmeiro speaks". baltimoresun.com.  ^ "ESPN.com: Page 2 : Pass the B-12".  ^ Chass, Murray (November 13, 2005). "Resolution, and Doubts, Regarding Palmeiro". The New York Times. Retrieved May 22, 2010.  ^ "Mitchell Report" (PDF). pp. 103–06, 203.  ^ "Affidavit: Grimsley named players". CNN. 2007-12-20. Retrieved 2007-12-31. [dead link] ^ Crasnick, Jerry. "Palmeiro now laying low with tarnished image". ESPN. Retrieved January 19, 2011.  ^ "Preston Palmeiro – 2016 Baseball". GoPack.com. Archived from the original on 6 June 2016. Retrieved 6 June 2016.  first1= missing last1= in Authors list (help)

External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors) Rafael Palmeiro
Rafael Palmeiro
suspended for steroid usage Appearances on C-SPAN

Preceded by John Olerud Bernie Williams Nomar Garciaparra Joe Randa American League
American League
Player of the Month July 1993 June 1998 June 1999 August 1999 (with Iván Rodríguez) Succeeded by Frank Thomas Albert Belle Joe Randa Albert Belle

v t e

1983 College Baseball All-America Team
1983 College Baseball All-America Team
selections

P Mike Cherry P Jim Hickey P Dennis Livingston P Calvin Schiraldi C Andy Allanson C Terry Bell 1B Dave Magadan 2B Jeff Trout 3B Carey Ross 3B Chris Sabo

SS Jeff Kunkel SS Bill Merrifield O Ben Abner O Kerwin Danley O Shane Mack O Rafael Palmeiro DH Eric Hardgrave DH Russ Morman U Rayner Noble

v t e

1984 College Baseball All-America Team
1984 College Baseball All-America Team
selections

P Scott Bankhead P John Hoover P Todd Simmons P Greg Swindell P Scott Wright C John Marzano C B. J. Surhoff 1B Mark McGwire 2B Billy Bates 2B Bob Ralston

3B David Denny 3B Gene Larkin SS Barry Larkin SS Cory Snyder O Chris Gwynn O Shane Mack O Oddibe McDowell O Rafael Palmeiro DH Pete Incaviglia

v t e

1985 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Draft First Round Selections

B. J. Surhoff Will Clark Bobby Witt Barry Larkin Kurt Brown Barry Bonds Mike Campbell Pete Incaviglia Mike Poehl Chris Gwynn Walt Weiss Cameron Drew Jeff Bumgarner Tommy Greene Willie Fraser Trey McCall Brian McRae Joe Magrane Mike Cook Gregg Jefferies Dan Gabriele Rafael Palmeiro Joey Cora Dave Masters Greg David Randy Nosek Bill McGuire Rick Balabon

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Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
first-round draft picks

1965: James 1966: Burk 1967: Hughes 1968: Rickey 1969: Metzger 1970: Hiser 1971: Wehmeier 1972: Vernoy 1973: Tabb 1974: Thompson 1975: Rosinski 1976: Segelke 1977: Martz 1978: Hayes 1979: Perlman 1980: Schulze 1981: Carter, Lovelace 1982: Dunston, Woods, Boderick 1983: Davidson 1984: Hall 1985: Palmeiro, Masters 1986: May 1987: Harkey 1988: Griffin 1989: Cunningham 1990: Dickson 1991: Glanville 1992: Wallace 1993: Kieschnick, Ratliff, Orie 1994: Peterson 1995: Wood 1996: Noel 1997: Garland 1998: Patterson 1999: Christensen 2000: Montañez 2001: Prior 2002: Brownlie, Hagerty, Blasko, Clanton 2003: Harvey 2004: None 2005: Pawelek 2006: Colvin 2007: Vitters, Donaldson 2008: Cashner, Flaherty 2009: Jackson 2010: Simpson 2011: Báez 2012: Almora, Johnson, Blackburn 2013: Bryant 2014: Schwarber 2015: Happ 2016: None 2017: Little, Lange

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Eastern League Most Valuable Player

1962: Hart 1963: Chance 1964: Bertaina 1965: Johnson 1966: Fisher 1967: Smith 1968: Fanzone 1969: Mangual 1970: Luzinski 1971: Locklear 1972: González 1973: Robson 1974: Macha 1975: Bergman 1976: Thomas 1977: Spilman 1978: Yurak 1979: Lancellotti 1980: M. Davis 1981: Kittle 1982: Bennett 1983: Stone 1984: Adams 1985: Snyder 1986: Palmeiro 1987: Grace 1988: Richie 1989: Chamberlain 1990: Bagwell 1991: Stairs 1992: R. Davis 1993: Floyd 1994: Grudzielanek 1995: Payton 1996: Guerrero 1997: Millar 1998: Pickering 1999: Tracy 2000: Hyzdu 2001: Byrd 2002: Martínez 2003: Ríos 2004: Howard 2005: Jacobs 2006: Lind 2007: Brown 2008: Montañez 2009: Santana 2010: Laird 2011: d'Arnaud 2012: Ruf 2013: Dykstra 2014: Moya 2015: Stassi 2016: Cozens 2017: Rosa

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American League
American League
First Baseman Gold Glove Award

1958: Power 1959: Power 1960: Power 1961: Power 1962: Power 1963: Power 1964: Power 1965: Pepitone 1966: Pepitone 1967: Scott 1968: Scott 1969: Pepitone 1970: Spencer 1971: Scott 1972: Scott 1973: Scott 1974: Scott 1975: Scott 1976: Scott 1977: Spencer 1978: Chambliss 1979: Cooper 1980: Cooper 1981: Squires 1982: Murray 1983: Murray 1984: Murray 1985: Mattingly 1986: Mattingly 1987: Mattingly 1988: Mattingly 1989: Mattingly 1990: McGwire 1991: Mattingly 1992: Mattingly 1993: Mattingly 1994: Mattingly 1995: Snow 1996: Snow 1997: Palmeiro 1998: Palmeiro 1999: Palmeiro 2000: Olerud 2001: Mientkiewicz 2002: Olerud 2003: Olerud 2004: Erstad 2005: Teixeira 2006: Teixeira 2007: Youkilis 2008: Peña 2009: Teixeira 2010: Teixeira 2011: González 2012: Teixeira 2013: Hosmer 2014: Hosmer 2015: Hosmer 2016: Moreland 2017: Hosmer

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American League
American League
First Baseman Silver Slugger Award

1980: Cooper 1981: Cooper 1982: Cooper 1983: Murray 1984: Murray 1985: Mattingly 1986: Mattingly 1987: Mattingly 1988: Brett 1989: McGriff 1990: C. Fielder 1991: C. Fielder 1992: McGwire 1993: Thomas 1994: Thomas 1995: Vaughn 1996: McGwire 1997: Martinez 1998: Palmeiro 1999: Delgado 2000: Delgado 2001: Giambi 2002: Giambi 2003: Delgado 2004: Teixeira 2005: Teixeira 2006: Morneau 2007: Peña 2008: Morneau 2009: Teixeira 2010: Cabrera 2011: Gonzalez 2012: P. Fielder 2013: Davis 2014: Abreu 2015: Cabrera 2016: Cabrera 2017: Hosmer

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American League
American League
Designated Hitter Silver Slugger Award

1980: Jackson 1981: Oliver 1982: McRae 1983: Baylor 1984: Thornton 1985: Baylor 1986: Baylor 1987: Molitor 1988: Molitor 1989: Baines 1990: Parker 1991: Thomas 1992: Winfield 1993: Molitor 1994: Franco 1995: E. Martínez 1996: Molitor 1997: E. Martínez 1998: Canseco 1999: Palmeiro 2000: Thomas 2001: E. Martínez 2002: Ramirez 2003: E. Martínez 2004: Ortiz 2005: Ortiz 2006: Ortiz 2007: Ortiz 2008: Huff 2009: Lind 2010: Guerrero 2011: Ortiz 2012: Butler 2013: Ortiz 2014: V. Martínez 2015: Morales 2016: Ortiz 2017: Cruz

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Sporting News MLB Player of the Year Award

1936: Hubbell 1937: Allen 1938: Vander Meer 1939: DiMaggio 1940: Feller 1941: T. Williams 1942: T. Williams 1943: Chandler 1944: Marion 1945: Newhouser 1946: Musial 1947: T. Williams 1948: Boudreau 1949: T. Williams 1950: Rizzuto 1951: Musial 1952: Roberts 1953: Rosen 1954: Mays 1955: Snider 1956: Mantle 1957: T. Williams 1958: Turley 1959: Wynn 1960: Mazeroski 1961: Maris 1962: Wills & Drysdale 1963: Koufax 1964: Boyer 1965: Koufax 1966: Robinson 1967: Yastrzemski 1968: McLain 1969: McCovey 1970: Bench 1971: Torre 1972: B. Williams 1973: Jackson 1974: Brock 1975: Morgan 1976: Morgan 1977: Carew 1978: Guidry 1979: Stargell 1980: Brett 1981: Valenzuela 1982: Yount 1983: Ripken Jr. 1984: Sandberg 1985: Mattingly 1986: Clemens 1987: Bell 1988: Hershiser 1989: Mitchell 1990: Bonds 1991: Ripken Jr. 1992: Sheffield 1993: Thomas 1994: Bagwell 1995: Belle 1996: Rodriguez 1997: Griffey Jr. 1998: Sosa 1999: Palmeiro 2000: Delgado 2001: Bonds 2002: Rodriguez 2003: Pujols 2004: Bonds 2005: Jones 2006: Howard 2007: Rodriguez 2008: Pujols 2009: Pujols 2010: Hamilton 2011: Verlander 2012: Cabrera 2013: Cabrera 2014: Kershaw 2015: Donaldson 2016: Altuve 2017: Altuve

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Edgar Martínez
Edgar Martínez
Award

1973: Cepeda 1974: T. Davis 1975: Horton 1976: McRae 1977: Rice 1978: Staub 1979: Horton 1980: McRae 1981: Luzinski 1982: McRae 1983: Luzinski 1984: Kingman 1985: Baylor 1986: Baylor 1987: Baines 1988: Baines 1989: Parker 1990: Parker 1991: C. Davis 1992: Winfield 1993: Molitor 1995: E. Martínez 1996: Molitor 1997: E. Martínez 1998: E. Martínez 1999: Palmeiro 2000: E. Martínez 2001: E. Martínez 2002: Burks 2003: Ortiz 2004: Ortiz 2005: Ortiz 2006: Ortiz 2007: Ortiz 2008: Huff 2009: Lind 2010: Guerrero 2011: Ortiz 2012: Butler 2013: Ortiz 2014: V. Martínez 2015: Morales 2016: Ortiz

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500 home run club

Barry Bonds Hank Aaron Babe Ruth Alex Rodriguez Willie Mays Ken Griffey Jr. Albert Pujols Jim Thome Sammy Sosa Frank Robinson Mark McGwire Harmon Killebrew Rafael Palmeiro Reggie Jackson Manny Ramirez Mike Schmidt David Ortiz Mickey Mantle Jimmie Foxx Willie McCovey Frank Thomas Ted Williams Ernie Banks Eddie Mathews Mel Ott Gary Sheffield Eddie Murray

Italics denotes active player

Book:500 home run club

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3,000 hit club

Pete Rose Ty Cobb Hank Aaron Stan Musial Tris Speaker Derek Jeter Honus Wagner Carl Yastrzemski Paul Molitor Eddie Collins Willie Mays Eddie Murray Nap Lajoie Cal Ripken Jr. George Brett Paul Waner Robin Yount Tony Gwynn Alex Rodriguez Dave Winfield Cap Anson Ichiro Suzuki Craig Biggio Rickey Henderson Rod Carew Adrián Beltré Lou Brock Rafael Palmeiro Wade Boggs Al Kaline Roberto Clemente

Italics denotes active player

Book:3,000 hit club

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Members of the National College Baseball Hall of Fame

Players

Jim Abbott Steve Arlin Joe Arnold Eddie Bane Sal Bando Alan Bannister Floyd Bannister Lance Berkman Bill Bordley Tom Borland Lou Brock Joe Carter Will Clark Matt DeSalvo Darren Dreifort Kirk Dressendorfer J. D. Drew Alex Fernandez Mike Fiore Terry Francona Eddy Furniss Nomar Garciaparra Ralph Garr Danny Goodwin Dick Groat Neal Heaton Don Heinkel Al Holland Burt Hooton Bob Horner Dick Howser Pete Incaviglia Tim Jorgensen Mike Kelly Brooks Kieschnick Fred Lynn Barry Larkin Tino Martinez William Clarence Matthews Ben McDonald Oddibe McDowell Dave Magadan Rick Monday Keith Moreland John Olerud Tom Paciorek Rafael Palmeiro Rick Reichardt Roy Smalley III Phil Stephenson Mickey Sullivan B. J. Surhoff Greg Swindell Derek Tatsuno Robin Ventura Frank Viola Tim Wallach Todd Walker Brad Wilkerson Dave Winfield Rich Wortham

Coaches

Bob Bennett Skip Bertman Robert Braddy Chuck Brayton Jim Brock Ed Cheff Rod Dedeaux Bibb Falk Ron Fraser Augie Garrido Gordie Gillespie Wayne Graham Cliff Gustafson Larry Hays Bill Holowaty Ralph Waldo Emerson Jones Wally Kincaid Jerry Kindall Demie Mainieri Ron Polk Frank Sancet Don Schaly Dick Siebert Gene Stephenson Mickey Sullivan Tommy Thomas Bob Todd Gary Ward Bill Wilhelm John Winkin Bobby Winkles

Veterans

Jack Barry Owen Carroll Billy Disch Lou Gehrig Christy Mathewson Branch Rickey Jackie Robinson Joe Sewell George Sisler Charles Teague

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 558955

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