HOME
The Info List - Pete Runnels





As player

Washington Senators (1951–1957) Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
(1958–1962) Houston Colt .45's
Houston Colt .45's
(1963–1964)

As manager

Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
(1966)

Career highlights and awards

5× All-Star (1959–1960², 1962²) 2× AL batting champion (1960, 1962) Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
Hall of Fame

James Edward "Pete" Runnels (January 28, 1928 – May 20, 1991) was an American Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
infielder who played for the Washington Senators (1951–57), Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
(1958–62) and Houston Colt .45s (1963–64). Runnels won two American League
American League
batting average championships while a member of the Red Sox.

Contents

1 Major League playing and coaching career 2 Post-baseball life 3 Honors 4 See also 5 References 6 External links

Major League playing and coaching career[edit] Born in Lufkin, Texas, the 6 ft (1.8 m), 170 lb (77 kg) Runnels batted left-handed and threw right-handed. A master at handling the bat, he was a notorious singles hitter who had one of the best eyes in the game, compiling an outstanding 1.35 walk-to-strikeout ratio (844-to-627). Altogether, he batted over .300 six times, once with the Senators, five with the Red Sox. Despite winning the batting title in 1960, he drove in just 35 runs, a record low for a batting title winner. Solid and versatile with the glove, Runnels started as a shortstop with the Senators, but ultimately played 644 games at first base, 642 at second, 463 at shortstop, and 49 at third. Twice he led the American League
American League
in fielding percentage, at second base in 1960 (.986), and at first base in 1961 (.995). He was not a good base stealer: in 1952 he set the record for most attempted steals with no successes, at 10. In his career he stole 37 bases and was caught 51 times. In five seasons with Boston, Runnels never hit less than .314 (1959), winning two batting crowns in 1960 (.320) and 1962 (.326), and just missed the 1958 American League
American League
Batting Crown by six points to his teammate Ted Williams
Ted Williams
on the final day of the 1958 season (.328 to .322). On August 30, 1960, in a double-header against the Tigers, Runnels hit 6-for-7 in the first game (including a game-winning RBI–double in the 15th inning) and 3-for-4 in the second, tying a Major League record for hits in a double-header (9). In 1962, Runnels played in his third All-Star Game for the American League
American League
and hit a home run off the Philadelphia Phillies' Art Mahaffey.[1] He went on to win the American League
American League
batting title that year. But after the season, Runnels was traded to the Houston Colt .45s
Houston Colt .45s
(forerunners of the Astros) in exchange for outfielder Román Mejías.[2] Runnels was released by Houston early in the 1964 season. Runnels was a career .291 hitter (1854-for-6373) with 49 home runs, 630 RBI, 876 runs, 282 doubles, 64 triples, 37 stolen bases, and a .375 on-base percentage in 1799 games. He was selected an All-Star in 1959, 1960 and 1962. He also coached for the Red Sox in 1965–1966, serving as an interim manager for the last 16 games of the 1966 season. Under Runnels, the Sox played .500 baseball and escaped last place by one-half game. However, he was replaced by Dick Williams
Dick Williams
for the 1967 season. Post-baseball life[edit] After leaving Major League Baseball, Runnels returned to his native state and opened a sporting goods store in Pasadena, Texas. He helped found and operate a co-ed camp, Camp Champions in Marble Falls, Texas, which is still in existence.[3] After suffering a stroke while golfing on May 17, 1991, Pete Runnels died three days later at Bayshore Hospital in Pasadena, Texas. He was buried at Forest Park East Cemetery in Houston.[4] Honors[edit] Runnels was inducted into the Texas Sports Hall of Fame in 1982.[5] He was also inducted into the Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
Hall of Fame in November 2004.[6] See also[edit]

List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
batting champions List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
single-game hits leaders

References[edit]

^ The Baseball Page.com, "Pete Runnels". http://www.thebaseballpage.com/players/runnepe01/bio . Retrieved September 2, 2013. ^ Baseball-Reference.com, "Pete Runnels". https://www.baseball-reference.com/players/r/runnepe01.shtml . Retrieved September 2, 2013. ^ The Baseball Page.com, ibid. ^ Baseball Page.com, ibid; Associated Press, "Pete Runnels" (obituary), The New York Times, May 21, 1991. ^ Texas Sports Hall of Fame, "Inductees: Pete Runnels". http://tshof.org/inductees/?staff_id=245 . Retrieved September 2, 2013. ^ Boston Red Sox, "Red Sox Hall of Fame". http://boston.redsox.mlb.com/bos/history/feature_hall_of_fame.jsp . Retrieved September 2, 2013.

External links[edit]

Baseball-Reference.com – career playing statistics and managing record Baseball Library Baseball Page Camp Champions [1]

Sporting positions

Preceded by Harry Malmberg Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
first-base coach 1965–1966 Succeeded by Bobby Doerr

v t e

American League
American League
batting champions

1901: Lajoie 1902: Disputed 1903: Lajoie 1904: Lajoie 1905: Flick 1906: Stone 1907: Cobb 1908: Cobb 1909: Cobb 1910: Disputed 1911: Cobb 1912: Cobb 1913: Cobb 1914: Cobb 1915: Cobb 1916: Speaker 1917: Cobb 1918: Cobb 1919: Cobb 1920: Sisler 1921: Heilmann 1922: Sisler 1923: Heilmann 1924: Ruth 1925: Heilmann 1926: Manush 1927: Heilmann 1928: Goslin 1929: Fonseca 1930: Simmons 1931: Simmons 1932: Alexander 1933: Foxx 1934: Gehrig 1935: Myer 1936: Appling 1937: Gehringer 1938: Foxx 1939: DiMaggio 1940: DiMaggio 1941: T. Williams 1942: T. Williams 1943: Appling 1944: Boudreau 1945: Stirnweiss 1946: Vernon 1947: T. Williams 1948: T. Williams 1949: Kell 1950: Goodman 1951: Fain 1952: Fain 1953: Vernon 1954: Ávila 1955: Kaline 1956: Mantle 1957: T. Williams 1958: T. Williams 1959: Kuenn 1960: Runnels 1961: Cash 1962: Runnels 1963: Yastrzemski 1964: Oliva 1965: Oliva 1966: Robinson 1967: Yastrzemski 1968: Yastrzemski 1969: Carew 1970: Johnson 1971: Oliva 1972: Carew 1973: Carew 1974: Carew 1975: Carew 1976: Brett 1977: Carew 1978: Carew 1979: Lynn 1980: Brett 1981: Lansford 1982: Wilson 1983: Boggs 1984: Mattingly 1985: Boggs 1986: Boggs 1987: Boggs 1988: Boggs 1989: Puckett 1990: Brett 1991: Franco 1992: Martínez 1993: Olerud 1994: O'Neill 1995: Martínez 1996: Rodriguez 1997: Thomas 1998: B. Williams 1999: Garciaparra 2000: Garciaparra 2001: Suzuki 2002: Ramirez 2003: Mueller 2004: Suzuki 2005: Young 2006: Mauer 2007: Ordóñez 2008: Mauer 2009: Mauer 2010: Hamilton 2011: Cabrera 2012: Cabrera 2013: Cabrera 2014: Altuve 2015: Cabrera 2016: Altuve 2017: Altuve

v t e

Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
managers

Jimmy Collins
Jimmy Collins
(1901–1906) Chick Stahl
Chick Stahl
(1906) Cy Young
Cy Young
(1907) Bob Unglaub
Bob Unglaub
(1907) George Huff (1907) Deacon McGuire
Deacon McGuire
(1907–1908) Fred Lake
Fred Lake
(1908–1909) Patsy Donovan
Patsy Donovan
(1910–1911) Jake Stahl
Jake Stahl
(1912–1913) Bill Carrigan
Bill Carrigan
(1913–1916) Jack Barry (1917) Ed Barrow
Ed Barrow
(1918–1920) Hugh Duffy
Hugh Duffy
(1921–1922) Frank Chance
Frank Chance
(1923) Lee Fohl
Lee Fohl
(1924–1926) Bill Carrigan
Bill Carrigan
(1927–1929) Heinie Wagner
Heinie Wagner
(1930) Shano Collins
Shano Collins
(1931–1932) Marty McManus
Marty McManus
(1932–1933) Bucky Harris
Bucky Harris
(1934) Joe Cronin
Joe Cronin
(1935–1947) Joe McCarthy (1948–1950) Steve O'Neill
Steve O'Neill
(1950–1951) Lou Boudreau
Lou Boudreau
(1952–1954) Pinky Higgins
Pinky Higgins
(1955–1959) Rudy York
Rudy York
(1959) Billy Jurges
Billy Jurges
(1959–1960) Del Baker
Del Baker
(1960) Pinky Higgins
Pinky Higgins
(1960–1962) Johnny Pesky
Johnny Pesky
(1963–1964) Billy Herman
Billy Herman
(1964–1966) Pete Runnels
Pete Runnels
(1966) Dick Williams
Dick Williams
(1967–1969) Eddie Popowski (1969) Eddie Kasko
Eddie Kasko
(1970–1973) Eddie Popowski (1973) Darrell Johnson (1974–1976) Don Zimmer
Don Zimmer
(1976–1980) Johnny Pesky
Johnny Pesky
(1980) Ralph Houk
Ralph Houk
(1981–1984) John McNamara (1985–1988) Joe Morgan (1988–1991) Butch Hobson
Butch Hobson
(1992–1994) Kevin Kennedy (1995–1996) Jimy Williams
Jimy Williams
(1997–2001) Joe Kerrigan
Joe Kerrigan
(2001) Grady Little (2002–2003) Terry Francona
Terry Francona
(2004–2011) Bobby Valentine
Bobby Valentine
(2012) John Farrell (2013–2017) Alex Cor

.