HOME
The Info List - Pee Wee Reese





Harold Peter Henry "Pee Wee" Reese (July 23, 1918 – August 14, 1999) was an American professional baseball player. He played in Major League Baseball
Baseball
as a shortstop for the Brooklyn and Los Angeles Dodgers from 1940 to 1958.[1] A ten-time All Star, Reese contributed to seven National League
National League
championships for the Dodgers and was inducted into the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame in 1984. Reese is also famous for his support of his teammate Jackie Robinson, the first modern African American
African American
player in the major leagues, especially in Robinson's difficult first years.

Contents

1 Early life 2 Baseball
Baseball
career

2.1 Early playing career 2.2 Jackie Robinson 2.3 Later career

3 Career statistics 4 Broadcasting career 5 Later life and death 6 Awards and honors 7 Personal life 8 In popular culture 9 See also 10 References 11 External links

Early life[edit] Reese's nickname originated in his childhood, as he was a champion marbles player (a "pee wee" is a small marble). Reese was born in Ekron, Meade County, Kentucky, and raised there until he was nearly eight years old, when his family moved to racially segregated Louisville. In high school, Reese was so small that he did not play baseball until senior year, at which time he weighed only 120 pounds and played just six games as a second baseman.[2] He graduated from duPont Manual High School in 1937.[citation needed] He worked as a cable splicer for the Louisville phone company, only playing amateur baseball in a church league. When Reese's team reached the league championship, the minor league Louisville Colonels allowed them to play the championship game on their field. Reese impressed Colonels owner Cap Neal, who signed him to a contract for a $200 bonus.[2] While playing for the Colonels, he was affectionately referred to by his teammates as "The Little Colonel."[3] Baseball
Baseball
career[edit]

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

By 1938, Reese was the Colonels' regular shortstop and one of the top prospects in the minors, and so impressed Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
farm director Billy Evans
Billy Evans
that he recommended the Red Sox buy the team. Evans and owner Tom Yawkey
Tom Yawkey
both knew that the Red Sox' regular shortstop, Joe Cronin, was nearing the end of his career.[2][4] However, Cronin was also the Red Sox' manager, and still thought of himself as a regular shortstop.[citation needed] When Yawkey sent Cronin to Louisville to scout Reese, Cronin realized that he was being asked to scout his own replacement. Cronin deliberately downplayed Reese's talent and suggested Reese be traded.[citation needed] It took a while to find a buyer, since the other teams assumed something had to be wrong with Reese if the Red Sox wanted to get rid of him. However, on July 18, 1939, Reese was sent to Brooklyn for $35,000 and four players to be named later. This trade is now considered one of the most lopsided deals in baseball history. As it turned out, Cronin was only a part-time player after 1941.[4] Reese stayed in Louisville for the rest of the 1939 season, and was called up to Brooklyn in time for the 1940 season. In an ironic twist, he walked into a situation where his manager was also the regular shortstop—in this case, Leo Durocher. Unlike Cronin, however, Durocher was willing to give up his spot in the lineup to Reese. Early playing career[edit]

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Reese with the Dodgers.

Reese's rookie season in 1940 was curtailed by a broken heel bone that limited him to 84 games in what had looked to be a promising season (.272 batting average with 58 runs scored). He had a thrilling moment that year, hitting a grand slam in the bottom of the ninth inning to beat the New York Giants. In 1941, he hit .229 and led the league with 47 errors. Even playing in the World Series
World Series
that year was a forgettable experience for Reese, as he batted .200 and made three errors in the five-game Yankee win. It was in the 1942 campaign that he truly established himself, making the National League
National League
All-Star team for the first of ten consecutive years and leading National League shortstops in both putouts and assists. Like many players of his era, he missed three seasons due to military service. Reese enlisted in the United States Navy
United States Navy
in 1943 and shipped out to fight in the Pacific theater of World War II. While Reese was in the service, the Dodgers languished, finishing no better than third place and as poorly as 42 games out (in seventh place) in 1943. Upon his return in 1946, Reese immediately righted the ship as the Dodgers battled the St. Louis Cardinals in a tight pennant race. The two teams ended the season tied for first place and met in the 1946 National League tie-breaker series.[5] It was the first playoff tiebreaker in Major League Baseball
Baseball
history.[6] The Cardinals won the first two games of the best-of-three game series to capture the National League pennant.[5] Jackie Robinson[edit]

This section needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve this article by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may be challenged and removed. (September 2017) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)

Reese was a strong supporter and good friend of the first ever black Major League Baseball
Baseball
player, Jackie Robinson. He was serving a stint in the Navy when the news of Robinson's signing came. Although he had little or no experience interacting with minorities—according to Reese, his meeting Robinson marked the first time in his life that he had shaken hands with a black man—he had no particular prejudices, either. It is reported that his father had made him starkly aware of racial injustice by showing him a tree where a lynching had occurred.[7] The modest Reese, who typically downplayed his pioneering role in helping to ease the breaking of the 60-year-old color line, said that his primary concern with regard to Robinson's arrival was the possibility of Reese losing his shortstop job. Robinson was assigned to play as the team's first baseman, and Reese retained his position. Reese refused to sign a petition that threatened a boycott if Robinson joined the team. When a sportswriter asked Reese if he was threatened by Robinson taking his position of shortstop, Reese simply responded, "If he can take my job, he's entitled to it." When Robinson joined the Dodgers in 1947 and traveled with them during their first road trip, he was heckled by fans in Cincinnati. A myth has persisted that during pre-game infield practice at Crosley Field
Crosley Field
(the then-home of the Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Reds), Reese, the captain of the team, went over to Robinson, engaged him in conversation, and put his arm around his shoulder in a gesture of support which silenced the crowd. This incident however actually occurred in 1948 in Boston.[1] The gesture is depicted in a bronze sculpture of Reese and Robinson, created by sculptor William Behrends, which was placed at MCU Park
MCU Park
in Brooklyn and unveiled on November 1, 2005. Throughout that difficult first year in the major leagues, Reese helped keep Robinson's morale up amid all the abuse. As the 1947 season wore on, there was tacit acceptance of the fact that blacks were now playing big league ball and were probably there to stay. Robinson still got pitches thrown at him, but, as Reese recounted to author Roger Kahn, "I told him, 'You know Jack, some of these guys are throwing at you because you're black. But others are doing it just because they plain don't like you.'" His role in nurturing Jackie Robinson aside, 1947 was a superb year for Reese, as he batted .284 with a league-leading 104 walks. He also had a career best slugging average of .426. Their rapport soon led shortstop Reese and second baseman Robinson to become one of the most effective defensive pairs in the sport's history. The friendship between Reese and Robinson is prominent in Roger Kahn's classic work, The Boys of Summer. Later career[edit]

Pee Wee helped make my boyhood dream come true to play in the majors, the World Series. When Pee Wee reached out to Jackie, all of us in the Negro League smiled and said it was the first time that a white guy had accepted us. When I finally got up to Brooklyn, I went to Pee Wee and said, "Black people love you. When you touched Jackie, you touched all of us." With Pee Wee, it was No. 1 on his uniform and No. 1 in our hearts. “ ”

Joe Black, another major league baseball black pioneer, at Reese's funeral.[8]

In 1949, Reese had his only league lead in a significant batting category, topping all National Leaguers with 132 runs scored. The Dodgers won the pennant again that year, but the Yankees continued to dominate in the World Series, winning in five games despite Reese's .316 Series average and team-leading five hits. Reese became Dodgers' team captain in 1950. In 1951, he had his career high in RBI, with 84. In 1952, he led the National League
National League
in stolen bases with 30. That year, Reese had his best Series, batting .345 with 10 hits, one home run and four RBI. In Game 3, Robinson and Reese pulled off a double steal, with both later scoring on a passed ball. The 1953 Dodgers won the National League
National League
pennant with a mark of 105–49 for a .682 winning percentage. Reese was a mainstay for the team, with 108 runs scored and a .271 batting average. The Yankees, however, again defeated the Dodgers in the 1953 World Series, four games to two. After the season, the Dodgers offered Reese the position of manager; when Reese declined the promotion, the Dodgers hired Walter Alston, who remained manager for more than two decades. In 1954, Reese batted .309, the only season in which he hit over .300. Though 36 years old, he was still going strong during the 1955 season, scoring 99 runs. In that year, the Dodgers won their first World Series. Reese had two RBIs in Game 2. In Game 7, he singled and scored an insurance run. While on the field, he doubled Gil McDougald
Gil McDougald
off first base after Sandy Amorós
Sandy Amorós
made a sensational catch of a Yogi Berra fly ball in left field and relayed the throw to Reese to help preserve the victory. In 1957, Reese yielded his starting role to another black ballplayer, Charlie Neal. As the Dodgers moved west in 1958, Reese joined them as a backup infielder, retiring that year after batting .224 in 59 games. He coached for the Dodgers in the 1959 season, earning a second World Series ring. Career statistics[edit] In a 16-year major league career, Reese played in 2,166 games, accumulating 2,170 hits in 8,058 at bats for a .269 career batting average along with 126 home runs, 885 runs batted in and an on-base percentage of .366. He retired with a .962 fielding percentage. Other than his Navy time between 1943 and 1945, Reese had no breaks in service and played at least 140 games in every year from 1941 to 1956. Consistently productive, he scored at least 75 runs from 1942 through 1956 and amassed 1338 lifetime, best of any Dodger. Though he never won a Most Valuable Player Award, eight times he ranked in the top ten of the Most Valuable Player Award balloting. He also was a home run threat during a time when shortstops seldom hit home runs. Reese amassed 252 stolen bases in a period when steals were not an integral part of the game. Defensively, he was an outstanding gloveman, leading National League
National League
shortstops four times in putouts and ranking in the top 10 all-time in putouts and double plays. One of the most popular players with both his teammates and the fans, the "Little Colonel" was the Dodgers' team captain, and he, not the manager, brought out the line-up card at the start of their games. Reese and Elston Howard
Elston Howard
have the dubious distinction of playing on the most losing World Series
World Series
teams (six each). Reese's only World Series win as a player, with the Dodgers in the 1955 World Series, occurred against Howard's New York Yankees during Howard's first World Series. No other non-Yankee ballplayer has appeared in that many World Series for the same team. Broadcasting career[edit]

Reese in a television commercial for Gillette
Gillette
razors, ca. 1956.

Following his retirement as a player, Reese enjoyed considerable success as a baseball play-by-play announcer. He called Game of the Week telecasts on CBS
CBS
from 1960 to 1965 (with Dizzy Dean) and for NBC from 1966 to 1968 (with Curt Gowdy). Reese also broadcast the 1967 and 1968 World Series
World Series
for NBC Radio, called Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Reds telecasts in 1969–1970, and served as a part-time television analyst for the Montreal Expos
Montreal Expos
in 1972. Later life and death[edit] In his later years, Reese was employed at Hillerich & Bradsby, makers of Louisville Slugger baseball bats. He battled prostate and lung cancer during the final years of his life, and died on August 14, 1999 at his Louisville home. He is interred at Resthaven Memorial Park Cemetery in Louisville. Awards and honors[edit]

Pee Wee Reese's number 1 was retired by the Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
in 1984.

In 1984, Reese was inducted into the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame and Museum along with Rick Ferrell. On his entry, his support of Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson
was cited as well as his playing performance as a testament to his worthiness of the Hall. A statue of Reese was erected in front of the main entrance of Louisville Slugger Field.[when?] A statue of Reese and Jackie Robinson
Jackie Robinson
was erected in Brooklyn, New York in November 2005, in front of KeySpan Park (now MCU Park) where the Mets (minor league) Class A Cyclones play. Their widows both attended the ceremony for the statue which memorializes the gesture of Reese and his teammates overcoming the racial barrier.[9] Personal life[edit] Reese was married to Dorothy "Dottie" Walton on March 29, 1942, who survived him in death. They had two children. Dottie died on March 7, 2012. In popular culture[edit]

Film – In the film 42, Reese is played by Lucas Black. The moment when he put his arm around Robinson is also depicted. Comics – The Chabad
Chabad
Lubavitch Hasidic movement commissioned a comic strip featuring a character based on Pee Wee Reese, the style of the strip was in the visual style of Chester Gould's Dick Tracy.[10]

See also[edit]

Biography portal Baseball
Baseball
portal

List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career hits leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career runs scored leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
career stolen bases leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
annual runs scored leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
annual stolen base leaders List of Major League Baseball
Baseball
players who spent their entire career with one franchise List of people from the Louisville metropolitan area

References[edit]

^ McHale, Matt. " Pee Wee Reese
Pee Wee Reese
Dies; Ex-Dodgers Captain Led Brooklyn Team to '55 Championship" – Los Angeles Daily News – (c/o TheFreeLibrary.com) – August 15, 1999 ^ a b c Baseball
Baseball
Digest, 1948, by Arthur Daley of The New York Times. ^ Worldwide, CMG. "Biography." Pee Wee Reese. CMG Worldwide, n.d. Web. 10 June 2017. ^ a b Neyer, Rob (2006). Rob Neyer's Big Book of Baseball
Baseball
Blunders. New York City: Fireside. ISBN 0-7432-8491-7.  ^ a b "1946 National League
National League
Team Statistics and Standings". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved October 15, 2011.  ^ " Tiebreaker Playoff Results". ESPN.com. September 30, 2008. Retrieved October 15, 2011.  ^ "Harold "Pee Wee" Reese – Youth In Kentucky". jrank.org.  ^ "Rachel Robinson Recalls How the Late Pee Wee Reese
Pee Wee Reese
Helped Jackie Robinson Integrate Baseball". Jet Magazine
Jet Magazine
(c/o FindArticles), September 13, 1999. ^ Berkow, Ira (November 2, 2005). "Two Men Who Did the Right Thing". The New York Times. Retrieved September 7, 2016.  ^ Seeman, Don. "Publishing Godliness: The Lubavitcher Rebbe's Other Revolution." Jewish Review of Books. July 16, 2014.

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Pee Wee Reese.

Pee Wee Reese
Pee Wee Reese
at the Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Career statistics and player information from Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball
Baseball
Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors) Pee Wee Reese
Pee Wee Reese
at Find a Grave Pee Wee's page @ Baseball
Baseball
Library.com Pee Wee's page @ Baseball
Baseball
Almanac.com The SPORT Gallery Classic photo of Pee Wee Reese
Pee Wee Reese
and the Boys of Summer

Preceded by Joe Garagiola Lead color commentator, Major League Baseball
Baseball
on NBC 1966–1968 Succeeded by Tony Kubek

v t e

Brooklyn Dodgers 1955 World Series
World Series
champions

1 Pee Wee Reese 4 Duke Snider 6 Carl Furillo 8 George Shuba 10 Rube Walker 12 Frank Kellert 14 Gil Hodges 15 Sandy Amorós 17 Carl Erskine 18 Jim Hughes 19 Jim Gilliam 23 Don Zimmer 30 Billy Loes 32 Sandy Koufax 34 Russ Meyer 36 Don Newcombe 37 Ed Roebuck 39 Roy Campanella
Roy Campanella
(NL MVP) 40 Roger Craig 41 Clem Labine 42 Jackie Robinson 43 Don Hoak 45 Johnny Podres
Johnny Podres
( World Series
World Series
MVP) 46 Don Bessent 48 Karl Spooner 54 Dixie Howell

Manager 24 Walter Alston

Coaches 22 Billy Herman 31 Jake Pitler 33 Joe Becker

1955 Brooklyn Dodgers season Dodgers–Yankees rivalry Subway Series

v t e

Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
1959 World Series
World Series
champions

2 Don Demeter 4 Duke Snider 5 Norm Larker 6 Carl Furillo 8 Ron Fairly 9 Wally Moon 14 Gil Hodges 16 Danny McDevitt 19 Jim Gilliam 20 Rip Repulski 22 Johnny Podres 23 Don Zimmer 29 Chuck Essegian 30 Maury Wills 32 Sandy Koufax 35 Johnny Klippstein 38 Roger Craig 40 Stan Williams 41 Clem Labine 43 Charlie Neal 44 Johnny Roseboro 45 Chuck Churn 51 Larry Sherry ( World Series
World Series
MVP) 53 Don Drysdale 58 Joe Pignatano

Manager 24 Walter Alston

Coaches 1 Pee Wee Reese 7 Chuck Dressen 31 Greg Mulleavy 33 Joe Becker

Regular season

v t e

Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
retired numbers

1 Pee Wee Reese 2 Tommy Lasorda 4 Duke Snider 19 Jim Gilliam 20 Don Sutton 24 Walter Alston 32 Sandy Koufax 39 Roy Campanella 42 Jackie Robinson 53 Don Drysdale MIC Vin Scully

v t e

Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Dodgers

Formerly the Brooklyn Robins and the Brooklyn Dodgers. Based in Los Angeles, California

Franchise

History in Brooklyn History in Los Angeles Seasons Award winners Records No-hitters Players First-round draft picks Managers Owners and executives Coaches Broadcasters Los Angeles Dodgers
Los Angeles Dodgers
Radio Network SportsNet LA Hall of Famers Opening Day starting pitchers

Ballparks

Washington Park Eastern Park Ridgewood Park Washington Park Ebbets Field Roosevelt Stadium Proposed domed stadium Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Memorial Coliseum Dodger Stadium Spring training: Whittington Park Majestic Park Barrs Field Tinker Field Clearwater Athletic Field City Island Ball Park Gran Stadium de La Habana Holman Stadium Camelback Ranch

Culture

Dodger Dog The First Rick Monday saves the American flag Chavez Ravine Dodger blue "I Love L.A." Roy Campanella
Roy Campanella
Award Historic Dodgertown Vin Scully Tommy Lasorda Nancy Bea Hilda Chester 2011 bankruptcy 42

Lore

Chronicle-Telegraph Cup 1955 World Series Fernandomania Kirk Gibson's 1988 World Series
World Series
home run Orel Hershiser's scoreless innings streak Sandy Koufax's perfect game "Shot Heard 'Round the World" NL tie-breaker games/series

1946 NL tie-breaker series 1951 NL tie-breaker series 1959 NL tie-breaker series 1962 NL tie-breaker series 1980 NL West tie-breaker game

Rivalries

San Francisco Giants Los Angeles
Los Angeles
Angels New York Yankees

Subway Series

Hall of Fame members

Walter Alston Roy Campanella Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Burleigh Grimes Willie Keeler Sandy Koufax Vin Scully Tommy Lasorda Walter O'Malley Pee Wee Reese Branch Rickey Jackie Robinson Wilbert Robinson Duke Snider Don Sutton Dazzy Vance Zack Wheat

Key personnel

Owner: Guggenheim Baseball
Baseball
Management President: Stan Kasten President of Baseball
Baseball
Operations: Andrew Friedman General Manager: Farhan Zaidi Manager: Dave Roberts

World Series Championships (6)

1955 1959 1963 1965 1981 1988

League pennants (23)

American Association: 1889 National League: 1890 1899 1900 1916 1920 1941 1947 1949 1952 1953 1955 1956 1959 1963 1965 1966 1974 1977 1978 1981 1988 2017

Division titles (16)

1974 1977 1978 1981 (first half) 1983 1985 1988 1995 2004 2008 2009 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017

Wild card berths (2)

1996 2006

Minor league affiliates

AAA: Oklahoma City Dodgers AA: Tulsa Drillers A Adv.: Rancho Cucamonga Quakes A: Great Lakes Loons Rookie Adv.: Ogden Raptors Rookie: AZL Dodgers DSL Dodgers 1 DSL Dodgers 2 Minor League Rosters

Seasons (136)

1880s

1880 · 1881 · 1882 · 1883 1884 1885 1886 1887 1888 1889

1890s

1890 1891 1892 1893 1894 1895 1896 1897 1898 1899

1900s

1900 1901 1902 1903 1904 1905 1906 1907 1908 1909

1910s

1910 1911 1912 1913 1914 1915 1916 1917 1918 1919

1920s

1920 1921 1922 1923 1924 1925 1926 1927 1928 1929

1930s

1930 1931 1932 1933 1934 1935 1936 1937 1938 1939

1940s

1940 1941 1942 1943 1944 1945 1946 1947 1948 1949

1950s

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959

1960s

1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969

1970s

1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979

1980s

1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

1990s

1990 1991 1992 1993 1994 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

2000s

2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009

2010s

2010 2011 2012 2013 2014 2015 2016 2017 2018

v t e

National League
National League
season stolen base leaders

1886: Andrews 1887: Ward 1888: Hoy 1889: Fogarty 1890: Hamilton 1891: Hamilton 1892: Ward 1893: Brown 1894: Hamilton 1895: Hamilton 1896: Kelley 1897: Lange 1898: Delahanty 1899: Sheckard 1900: Donovan & Van Haltren 1901: Wagner 1902: Wagner 1903: Chance & Sheckard 1904: Wagner 1905: Devlin & Maloney 1906: Chance 1907: Wagner 1908: Wagner 1909: Bescher 1910: Bescher 1911: Bescher 1912: Bescher 1913: Carey 1914: Burns 1915: Carey 1916: Carey 1917: Carey 1918: Carey 1919: Burns 1920: Carey 1921: Frisch 1922: Carey 1923: Carey 1924: Carey 1925: Carey 1926: Cuyler 1927: Frisch 1928: Cuyler 1929: Cuyler 1930: Cuyler 1931: Frisch 1932: Klein 1933: Martin 1934: Martin 1935: Galan 1936: Martin 1937: Galan 1938: Hack 1939: Hack & Handley 1940: Frey 1941: Murtaugh 1942: Reiser 1943: Vaughan 1944: Barrett 1945: Schoendienst 1946: Reiser 1947: Robinson 1948: Ashburn 1949: Robinson 1950: Jethroe 1951: Jethroe 1952: Reese 1953: Bruton 1954: Bruton 1955: Bruton 1956: Mays 1957: Mays 1958: Mays 1959: Mays 1960: Wills 1961: Wills 1962: Wills 1963: Wills 1964: Wills 1965: Wills 1966: Brock 1967: Brock 1968: Brock 1969: Brock 1970: Tolan 1971: Brock 1972: Brock 1973: Brock 1974: Brock 1975: Lopes 1976: Lopes 1977: F. Taveras 1978: Moreno 1979: Moreno 1980: LeFlore 1981: Raines 1982: Raines 1983: Raines 1984: Raines 1985: Coleman 1986: Coleman 1987: Coleman 1988: Coleman 1989: Coleman 1990: Coleman 1991: Grissom 1992: Grissom 1993: Carr 1994: Biggio 1995: Veras 1996: Young, Sr. 1997: Womack 1998: Womack 1999: Womack 2000: Castillo 2001: Pierre & Rollins 2002: Castillo 2003: Pierre 2004: Podsednik 2005: Reyes 2006: Reyes 2007: Reyes 2008: W. Taveras 2009: Bourn 2010: Bourn 2011: Bourn 2012: Cabrera 2013: Young Jr. 2014: Gordon 2015: Gordon 2016: Villar 2017: Gordon

v t e

Lou Gehrig
Lou Gehrig
Memorial Award

1955: Dark 1956: Reese 1957: Musial 1958: McDougald 1959: Hodges 1960: Groat 1961: Spahn 1962: Roberts 1963: Richardson 1964: Boyer 1965: Law 1966: Robinson 1967: Banks 1968: Kaline 1969: Rose 1970: Aaron 1971: Killebrew 1972: Parker 1973: Santo 1974: Stargell 1975: Bench 1976: Sutton 1977: Brock 1978: Kessinger 1979: Niekro 1980: Pérez 1981: John 1982: Cey 1983: Schmidt 1984: Garvey 1985: Murphy 1986: Brett 1987: Sutcliffe 1988: Bell 1989: Smith 1990: Davis 1991: Hrbek 1992: Ripken, Jr. 1993: Mattingly 1994: Larkin 1995: Schilling 1996: Butler 1997: Molitor 1998: Gwynn 1999: McGwire 2000: Stottlemyre 2001: Franco 2002: Graves 2003: Moyer 2004: Thome 2005: Smoltz 2006: Hoffman 2007: Timlin 2008: Victorino 2009: Pujols 2010: Jeter 2011: Zimmerman 2012: Zito 2013: Hamilton 2014: Beltre 2015: Granderson 2016: Harvey 2017: Altuve

v t e

Major League Baseball
Baseball
on CBS

Related programs

Major League Baseball
Baseball
Game of the Week (1955–1965; 1990–1993) Major League Baseball
Baseball
on CBS
CBS
Radio (1927–1941; 1976–1997) College World Series
World Series
on CBS
CBS
(1988–2002, broadcasters) The Franchise (2011-2012)

Related articles

World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts

1964 season

Baltimore Orioles Chicago Cubs New York Yankees Philadelphia Phillies St. Louis Cardinals

CBS
CBS
TV Stations

WJZ 13 (Baltimore Orioles, 1954) WBZ 4 (Boston Braves, 1948-1949; Boston Red Sox, 1948-1954) W CBS
CBS
2 (Brooklyn Dodgers, 1946–1949; New York Yankees, 2002-2004) KPIX 5 (Oakland Athletics, 1975-1981; 1985-1992) WPTZ 3 (later KYW) (Philadelphia Athletics, 1947-1954) KDKA 2 (Pittsburgh Pirates, 1958-1995)

Sponsors

Falstaff Brewing Corporation

Commentators

All-Star Game ALCS NLCS World Series

Key figures

Red Barber Jack Buck Dizzy Dean Connie Desmond Bill Geist Greg Gumbel George Kell Gene Kirby Sean McDonough Don Robertson Dick Stockton Jack Whitaker

Color commentators

Buddy Blattner Frankie Frisch Gabby Hartnett Jim Kaat Tim McCarver Jim McKay Pee Wee Reese Frank Reynolds

Hosts & field reporters

James Brown Jerry Coleman Jim Gray Andrea Joyce Pat O'Brien Lesley Visser

Guest commentators

Johnny Bench Tommy Lasorda Steve Stone

World Series

1947 (Games 3-4) 1948 1949 1950 1990 1991 1992 1993

AL Championship

1990 1991 1992 1993

NL Championship

1990 1991 1992 1993

All-Star Game

1949 1990 1991 1992 1993

Lore

1951 National League
National League
tie-breaker series (Game 1) Nasty Boys ( Cincinnati
Cincinnati
Reds) (1990) "And we'll see you tomorrow night!" (1991) "The Slide" (1992) "Touch 'em all Joe!" (1993)

Music

"The Boys of Summer" "The Famous Final Scene" "Famous Last Words" "Right Now"

Instrumentals

"Desert Ride" Jurassic Park (film score) "Overture" "The Walk Home"

Seasons

Early World Series
World Series
coverage

1947 1948 1949

Initial Game of the Week era

1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (New York Yankees games only)

Exclusive network package

1990 1991 1992 1993

Website: MLB Baseball
Baseball
- CBSSports.com

v t e

Major League Baseball
Baseball
on NBC

Related programs

Baseball
Baseball
Night in America (1994–1995) Major League Baseball: An Inside Look (1979–1989) Major League Baseball
Baseball
Game of the Week (1957–1964; 1966–1989) Major League Baseball
Baseball
on NBC Radio (1927–1938; 1957–1975) Monday Night Baseball
Baseball
(1967–1975)

Misc. programs

Gillette
Gillette
Cavalcade of Sports USA Thursday Game of the Week (1979–1983)

Related articles

The Baseball
Baseball
Network World Series
World Series
television ratings Television contracts

NBC's owned & operated TV stations

W2XBS (later WNBT) (New York Yankees, 1939–1945) WCAU
WCAU
10 (Philadelphia Phillies, 2014–present) KCST 39 (later KNSD) (San Diego Padres, 1971–1972; 1984–1986) KNTV
KNTV
11 (San Francisco Giants, 2008–present)

NBC Sports

Bay Area (San Francisco Giants) California (Oakland Athletics) Chicago (Chicago Cubs & White Sox) Philadelphia (Philadelphia Phillies) New York (New York Mets)

Sponsors

Ford Gillette National Bohemian

Commentators

The Baseball
Baseball
Network All-Star Game ALCS ALDS NLCS NLDS World Series

Key figures

Mel Allen Jim Britt Jack Buck Skip Caray Bob Carpenter Bob Costas Dick Enberg Bill Enis Joe Garagiola Curt Gowdy Greg Gumbel Merle Harmon Ernie Harwell Charlie Jones George Kell Jon Miller Monte Moore Bob Neal Lindsey Nelson Bill O'Donnell Jay Randolph Ted Robinson Vin Scully Jim Simpson Chuck Thompson Gary Thorne Pete van Wieren Bob Wolff Jim Woods

Color commentators

Sal Bando Bucky Dent Larry Dierker Don Drysdale Leo Durocher Joe Garagiola Ken Harrelson Fred Haney Tommy Hutton Jim Kaat Sandy Koufax Tony Kubek Ron Luciano John Lowenstein Mickey Mantle Tim McCarver Joe Morgan Bobby Murcer Wes Parker Pee Wee Reese Al Rosen Tom Seaver Mike Shannon Joe Torre Bob Uecker Bill Veeck Maury Wills

Guest commentators

Rick Dempsey Barry Larkin Ronald Reagan Mike Schmidt Don Sutton Bobby Valentine

Hosts

Mike Adamle Marv Albert Len Berman Jimmy Cefalo Gayle Gardner Bryant Gumbel Bill Macatee Keith Olbermann Ahmad Rashād Hannah Storm

Field reporters

Johnny Bench Jim Gray Jimmy Roberts Craig Sager Bob Wischusen

Lore

Regular season games

#715 (1974) "The Sandberg Game" (1984)

Tie-breaker games

1951 National League
National League
tie-breaker series (Games 2-3) 1962 National League
National League
tie-breaker series

LCS games

"Go crazy folks!" (1985) Jeffrey Maier (1996) "Grand Slam Single" (1999)

World Series games

Subway Series "The Catch (1954)" Don Larsen's Perfect Game (1956) "Shoe polish incident" (1969) "Fisk Waves it Fair" (1975) Michael Sergio (1986) "It gets through Buckner!" (1986) Kirk Gibson's home run (1988) All-Century Team (1999)

Music

"Broken Wings" "Don't Let Me Be Misunderstood" "Don't Look in My Eyes" "Fame" "Limelight" "One Moment in Time" "The Stuff That Dreams Are Made Of"

Instrumentals

The Adventures of Brisco County, Jr. "Chase" "Don't Turn Away" "Take Me Out to the Ball Game" The Untouchables

World Series

1947 (Games 1 & 5) 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1978 1980 1982 1984 1986 1988 1995 (Games 2–3, & 6) 1997 1999

AL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–6) 1996 1998 2000

NL Championship

1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1995 (Games 3–4) 1997 1999

AL Division Series

1995 1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

NL Division Series

1981 1995 1996 1997 1998 1999

All-Star Game

1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956 1957 1958 1959: First–Second 1960: First–Second 1961: First–Second 1962: First–Second 1963 1964 1965 1966 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1977 1979 1981 1983 1985 1987 1989 1994 1996 1998 2000

Seasons

Pre-Game of the Week

1947 1948 1949 1950 1951 1952 1953 1954 1955 1956

Game of the Week era

1957 1958 1959 1960 1961 1962 1963 1964 1965 (All-Star Game and World Series
World Series
only) 1966 (exclusive coverage begins) 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 1975 1976 1977 1978 1979 1980 1981 1982 1983 1984 1985 1986 1987 1988 1989

The Baseball
Baseball
Network era

1994 1995

No regular season coverage

1996 1997 1998 1999 2000

v t e

Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame Class of 1984

BBWAA Vote

Luis Aparicio
Luis Aparicio
(84.6%) Don Drysdale
Don Drysdale
(78.4%) Harmon Killebrew
Harmon Killebrew
(83.1%)

Veterans Committee

Rick Ferrell Pee Wee Reese

J. G. Taylor Spink Award

Ken Smith

Ford C. Frick Award

Curt Gowdy

v t e

Members of the National Baseball
Baseball
Hall of Fame

Pitchers

Alexander Bender Blyleven M. Brown R. Brown Bunning Carlton Chesbro Clarkson Cooper Coveleski Cummings Day Dean Dihigo Drysdale Eckersley Faber Feller Fingers Ford B. Foster Galvin B. Gibson Glavine Gomez Gossage Grimes Grove Haines Hoffman Hoyt Hubbell Hunter Jenkins R. Johnson W. Johnson Joss Keefe Koufax Lemon Lyons Maddux Marichal Marquard Martínez Mathewson McGinnity Méndez Morris Newhouser Nichols Niekro Paige Palmer Pennock Perry Plank Radbourn Rixey Roberts Rogan Ruffing Rusie Ryan Seaver H. Smith Smoltz Spahn Sutter Sutton Vance Waddell Walsh Welch Wilhelm J. Williams Willis Wynn Young

Catchers

Bench Berra Bresnahan Campanella Carter Cochrane Dickey Ewing Ferrell Fisk J. Gibson Hartnett Lombardi Mackey Piazza Rodríguez Santop Schalk

First basemen

Anson Bagwell Beckley Bottomley Brouthers Cepeda Chance Connor Foxx Gehrig Greenberg G. Kelly Killebrew Leonard McCovey Mize Murray Pérez Sisler Suttles Taylor Terry Thomas Thome

Second basemen

Alomar Biggio Carew E. Collins Doerr Evers Fox Frisch Gehringer Gordon Grant Herman Hornsby Lajoie Lazzeri Mazeroski McPhee Morgan J. Robinson Sandberg Schoendienst

Third basemen

Baker Boggs Brett J. Collins Dandridge J. Johnson Jones Kell Lindstrom Mathews Molitor B. Robinson Santo Schmidt Traynor J. Wilson D. White

Shortstops

Aparicio Appling Bancroft Banks Boudreau Cronin Davis T. Jackson Jennings Larkin Lloyd Maranville Reese Ripken Jr. Rizzuto Sewell O. Smith Tinker Trammell Vaughan Wagner Wallace Ward Wells Yount

Outfielders

Aaron Ashburn Averill Bell Brock W. Brown Burkett Carey Charleston Clarke Clemente Cobb Combs Crawford Cuyler Dawson Delahanty DiMaggio Doby Duffy Flick Goslin Griffey Jr. Guerrero Gwynn Hafey Hamilton Heilmann Henderson Hill Hooper Irvin R. Jackson Kaline Keeler Kelley K. Kelly Kiner Klein Mantle Manush Mays T. McCarthy Medwick Musial O'Rourke Ott Puckett Raines J. Rice S. Rice F. Robinson Roush Ruth Simmons Slaughter Snider Speaker Stargell Stearnes Thompson Torriente L. Waner P. Waner Wheat B. Williams T. Williams H. Wilson Winfield Yastrzemski Youngs

Managers

Alston Anderson Cox Durocher Hanlon Harris Herzog Huggins La Russa Lasorda López Mack J. McCarthy McGraw McKechnie W. Robinson Selee Southworth Stengel Torre Weaver D. Williams

Executives / pioneers

Barrow Bulkeley Cartwright Chadwick Chandler Comiskey Dreyfuss R. Foster Frick Giles Gillick Griffith Harridge Hulbert B. Johnson Kuhn Landis La. MacPhail Le. MacPhail Manley O'Malley Pompez Posey Rickey Ruppert Schuerholz Selig Spalding Veeck Weiss S. White Wilkinson G. Wright H. Wright Yawkey

Umpires

Barlick Chylak Conlan Connolly Evans Harvey Hubbard Klem McGowan O'Day

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 21287759 LCCN: n89642356 SN

.