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The Info List - Paschal Offering





The Passover
Passover
sacrifice (Hebrew: קרבן פסח‬ Korban
Korban
Pesakh), also known as the "sacrifice of Passover", the Paschal Lamb, or the Passover
Passover
Lamb, is the sacrifice that the Torah
Torah
mandates Jews
Jews
and Samaritans
Samaritans
to ritually slaughter on the eve of Passover, and eat on the first night of the holiday with bitter herbs and matzo. According to the Torah, it was first offered on the night of the Israelites' Exodus from Egypt. Although practiced by Jews
Jews
in ancient times, the ritual is today only practiced by Samaritans
Samaritans
at Mount Gerizim.[1]

Contents

1 Torah
Torah
(Hebrew Bible) 2 Rabbinical interpretation

2.1 The sacrificial animal 2.2 Timing: Passover
Passover
Eve on the Sabbath 2.3 The three groups of lay people 2.4 The Home Ceremony

3 Modern attempts to revive the sacrifice 4 Christianity 5 See also 6 References

Torah
Torah
(Hebrew Bible)[edit] The blood of this sacrifice sprinkled on the door-posts of the Israelites
Israelites
was to be a sign to God, when passing through the land to slay the first-born of the Egyptians
Egyptians
that night, that he should pass by the houses of the Israelites
Israelites
(Exodus 12:1-28) In the Mishnah
Mishnah
this is called the " Passover
Passover
of Egypt" (Pesaḥ Miẓrayim in M. Pesach
Pesach
ix. 5). It was ordained, furthermore (Exodus 12:24-27), that this observance should be repeated annually for all time once the Israelites
Israelites
entered into their promised land. Exodus 12:25 "It will come to pass when you come to the land which the Lord will give you, just as He promised, that you shall keep this service (NKJV). This so-called "Pesaḥ Dorot," the Passover
Passover
of succeeding generations ( Mishnah
Mishnah
Pesach
Pesach
l.c.), differs in many respects from the Passover
Passover
of Egypt (Pesaḥ Miẓrayim). In the pre-exilic period, however, Passover
Passover
was rarely sacrificed in accordance with the legal prescriptions (comp. II Chron.
II Chron.
xxxv. 18).

The Lord spoke to Moses in the wilderness of Sinai, on the first new moon of the second year following the exodus from the land of Egypt, saying: Let the Israelite people offer the passover sacrifice at its set time: you shall offer it on the fourteenth day of this month, at twilight, at its set time; you shall offer it in accordance with all its rites and rules —  Num.
Num.
9:1–3, JPS translation

Rabbinical interpretation[edit] According to Rashi, on Numbers 9:1, only once during their forty years of wandering in the wilderness, one year after the Exodus, was the sacrifice offered. For the next 39 years there was no offering, according to Rashi, as God stipulated that it could only be offered after the Children of Israel had entered the Land of Israel. In fact, the bringing of the Pesach
Pesach
sacrifice resumed only after the Israelites had taken possession of the land, and then the sacrifice was made annually until during the times when Solomon's Temple
Solomon's Temple
and the Second Temple stood and functioned. During this time there was a definite ritual for the offering, in addition to the regulations prescribed by the Law. The following is a brief summary of the principal ordinances and of the ritual accompanying the sacrifice: The sacrificial animal[edit] The sacrificial animal, which was either a lamb or goat, was necessarily a male, one year old, and without blemish. Each family or society offered one animal together, which did not require the "semikah" (laying on of hands), although it was obligatory to determine who were to take part in the sacrifice that the killing might take place with the proper intentions. Only those who were circumcised and clean before the Law might participate, and they were forbidden to have leavened food in their possession during the act of killing the paschal lamb. The animal was slain on the eve of the Passover, on the afternoon of the 14th of Nisan,[2] after the Tamid sacrifice had been killed, i.e., at three o'clock, or, in case the eve of the Passover
Passover
fell on Friday, at two.[3] The sacrificial service took place in the courtyard of the Temple at Jerusalem. Strictly speaking, slaughtering could be performed by a layman, but in practice was performed by priests. The blood had to be collected by a priest, and rows of priests with gold or silver cups in their hands stood in line from the Temple court to the altar, where the blood was sprinkled. These cups were rounded on the bottom, so that they could not be set down; for in that case the blood might coagulate. The priest who caught the blood as it dropped from the animal then handed the cup to the priest next to him, receiving from him an empty one, and the full cup was passed along the line until it reached the last priest, who sprinkled its contents on the altar. The lamb was then hung upon special hooks or sticks and skinned; but if the eve of the Passover
Passover
fell on a Sabbath, the skin was removed down to the breast only. The abdomen was then cut open, and the fatty portions intended for the altar were taken out, placed in a vessel, salted, and offered by the priest on the altar, while the remaining entrails likewise were taken out and cleansed.[3] While the required quorum for most activities requiring a quorum is usually ten, the Korban
Korban
Pesach
Pesach
must be offered before a quorum of 30. (It must be performed in front of kahal adat yisrael, the assembly of the congregation of Israel. Ten are needed for the assembly, ten for the congregation, and ten for Israel.) According to some Talmudic authorities, such as Rav Kahana IV, women counted in the minyan for offering the passover sacrifice (B. Pesachim 79b). Timing: Passover
Passover
Eve on the Sabbath[edit] Even if the eve of the Passover
Passover
fell on a Sabbath, the paschal lamb was killed in the manner described above, the blood was sprinkled on the altar, the entrails removed and cleansed, and the fat offered on the altar; for these four ceremonies in the case of the paschal lamb, and these alone, were exempt from the prohibition against working on the Sabbath. This regulation, that the Sabbath yielded the precedence to the Passover, was not definitely determined until the time of Hillel, who established it as a law and was in return elevated to the dignity of nasi by Judah ben Bathyra.(B. Pesachim 68a). The three groups of lay people[edit] The people taking part in the sacrifice were divided into three groups. The first of these filled the court of the Temple, so that the gates had to be closed, and while they were killing and offering their paschal lambs the Levites on the platform (dukan) recited the "Hallel" (Psalms 113-118), accompanied by instruments of brass. If the Levites finished their recitation before the priests had completed the sacrifice, they repeated the "Hallel," although it never happened that they had to repeat it twice. As soon as the first group had offered their sacrifice, the gates were opened to let them out, and their places were taken by the second and third groups successively. All three groups offered their sacrifice in the manner described, while the "Hallel" was recited; but the third group was so small that it had always finished before the Levites reached Psalm
Psalm
116. It was called the "group of the lazy" because it came last. Even if the majority of the people were ritually unclean on the eve of the Passover, the sacrifice was offered on the 14th of Nisan. Other sacrifices, on the contrary, called "ḥagigah," which were offered together with the paschal lamb, were omitted if the eve of the Passover
Passover
fell on a Sabbath, or if the sacrifice was offered in a state of uncleanness, or if the number of participants was so small that they could not consume all the meat. When the sacrifice was completed and the animal was ready for roasting, each one present carried his lamb home, except when the eve of the Passover
Passover
fell on a Sabbath, in which case it might not be taken away.[3] The Home Ceremony[edit] If the 14th of Nissan fell on the Sabbath, the first group stationed itself on the mount of the Temple in Jerusalem, the second group in the "ḥel," the space between the Temple wall and the Temple hall, while the third group remained in the Temple court, thus awaiting the evening, when they took their lambs home and roasted them on a spit of pomegranate-wood, On all other days, they could do it before nightfall (and if the 15th of Nissan fell to be on the Sabbath they would have to). No bones might be broken either during the cooking or during the eating. The lamb was set on the table at the evening banquet (see Passover
Passover
Seder), and was eaten by the assembled company after all had satisfied their appetites with the ḥagigah or other food. The sacrifice had to be consumed entirely that same evening, nothing being allowed to remain overnight. While eating it, the entire company of those who partook was obliged to remain together, and every participant had to take a piece of the lamb at least as large as an olive. Women and girls also might take part in the banquet and eat of the sacrifice. The following benediction was pronounced before eating the lamb: "Blessed be Thou, the Eternal, our God, the King of the world, who hast sanctified us by Thy commands, and hast ordained that we should eat the Passover." The "Hallel" was recited during the meal, and when the lamb had been eaten the meaning of the custom was explained, and the story of the Exodus was told (see Passover Seder).[3] The paschal sacrifice belongs to the shelamim, thus forming one of the sacrifices in which the meal is the principal part and indicates the community between God and man. It is really a house or family sacrifice, and each household is regarded as constituting a small community in itself, not only because the lamb is eaten at home, but also because every member of the family is obliged to partake of the meal, on pain of ritual excommunication, although each man must be circumcised and all must be ritually clean. The fact that the paschal lamb might be killed only at the central sanctuary of Jerusalem, on the other hand, implies that each household was but a member of the larger community; this is indicated also by the national character of the sacrifice, which kept alive in the memory of the nation the preservation and liberation of the entire people.[3] Modern attempts to revive the sacrifice[edit] In 2007, a group of rabbis led by Adin Steinsalz
Adin Steinsalz
and supported by the Temple Mount Faithful and the New Sanhedrin Council identified a Kohen who was a butcher, made plans for conducting a Passover
Passover
sacrifice on the Temple Mount, and petitioned the Israeli High Court of Justice for permission. The Court sided with the government and rejected the request, holding that such an event would inflame religious tensions and would threaten security. The incident was a successor to a series of earlier attempts by various groups to perform such a sacrifice, either openly or by subterfuge.[4][5] In 2008, animal rights group Tnoo Lachayot Lichyot ("Let the Animals Live") sued the Temple Institute, claiming its conduct of a practice Passover
Passover
sacrifice demonstration would constitute animal cruelty. An Israeli court rejected the claim.[6] In 2016, Jewish activists pushing for a third temple in Jerusalem attempted to ascend the Temple Mount
Temple Mount
carrying baby goats intended to be used as Passover
Passover
sacrifices on Friday afternoon, as they do every year. Jerusalem
Jerusalem
police detained ten suspects in the Old City for interrogation, and seized four sacrificial goat kids. Among those arrested were Kach activist Noam Federman, who attempts make the sacrifice every year, and Rafael Morris, an activist in the Temple Mount Faithful movement.[citation needed] Christianity[edit] Main article: Passover
Passover
(Christian holiday) See also: Easter controversy

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Easter is the most important part of the Christian Calendar and should align with the ancient Passover
Passover
festival. For Christians the historic sacrifice and consumption of the passover lamb was an attempt to atone for sin. The Passover
Passover
lambs slain in Solomon's Temple
Solomon's Temple
were born and bred in the City of David. They were well-treated and only those without blemish were allowed to be sacrificed. However the prophet Isaiah tells us that God was sickened by these sacrifices (Isaiah 1) and described how the Messiah will provide perfect redemption (Isaiah 53). According to traditional Christianity, Jesus was born from a virgin without sin. He lived a life without sin and died without sin at the prime of his life. His crucifixion was the perfect sacrifice which Isaiah had prophesied would please God and provide redemption. This is why Christ is known as the Lamb of God (Agnus Dei). During the Last Supper, a Passover
Passover
meal the night before his crucifixion, Christ told his apostles to remember him by eating bread which was his flesh and drinking wine which was his blood. Traditional Christians celebrate Mass throughout the year. The priests offer gifts of bread and wine to God in remembrance of Christ's perfect sacrifice. The priests repeat the words of Christ from the last supper. After this the congregation eat the host and drink the blood of Christ. Most Christian denominations perform elements of this rite. See also[edit]

Korban

References[edit]  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Singer, Isidore; et al., eds. (1901–1906). " Passover
Passover
Sacrifice". Jewish Encyclopedia. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company. 

^ Members of the Samaritan sect in Israel skewer sheep for the traditional Passover
Passover
ceremony in West Bank city of Nablus ^ Leviticus 23 ^ a b c d e  This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Executive Committee of the Editorial Board, Jacob Zallel Lauterbach
Jacob Zallel Lauterbach
(1901–1906). "Passover Sacrifice". In Singer, Isidore; et al. Jewish Encyclopedia. New York: Funk & Wagnalls Company.  ^ Shargai, Nadav; Barkat, Amiram (2007-02-04), "Court prevents groups from sacrificing live animals at Temple Mount", Haaretz, retrieved 2008-10-07  ^ "Rabbis aim to renew animal sacrifices", Jerusalem
Jerusalem
Post, 2007-02-28, archived from the original on 2012-01-11, retrieved 2008-10-07  ^ Judge Rules Paschal Sacrifice Practice 'Proper,' Appeal Filed, Israeli National News, 2008-04-08, retrieved 2008-10-07 

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Passover
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Passover
sacrifice Chol HaMoed Mimouna Isru Chag Pesach
Pesach
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