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These are small crosses made up of palm on occasion of palm Sunday.

Palm Sunday
Sunday
is a Christian moveable feast that falls on the Sunday before Easter. The feast commemorates Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem, an event mentioned in each of the four canonical Gospels.[3] In many Catholic, Episcopal denominations and the Ethiopian Orthodox Church, worship services on Palm Sunday
Sunday
include a procession of the faithful carrying palms, representing the palm branches the crowd scattered in front of Jesus
Jesus
as he rode into Jerusalem. The difficulty of procuring palms in unfavorable climates led to their substitution with branches of native trees, including box, olive, willow, and yew. The Sunday
Sunday
was often named after these substitute trees, as in Yew Sunday, or by the general term Branch Sunday.

Contents

1 Biblical basis and symbolism 2 Observance in the liturgy

2.1 Eastern and Oriental Christianity 2.2 Western Christianity

3 Customs

3.1 Belgium 3.2 Bulgaria 3.3 England 3.4 Ethiopia 3.5 Finland 3.6 India 3.7 Italy 3.8 Latvia 3.9 Lithuania 3.10 The Levant 3.11 Malta 3.12 Netherlands 3.13 Philippines 3.14 Poland 3.15 Romania
Romania
and Moldova 3.16 Spain 3.17 Syria 3.18 Wales

4 See also 5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External links

Biblical basis and symbolism[edit]

Events in the

Life of Jesus according to the Gospels

Early life

Annunciation

Visitation

Nativity

Virgin birth Adoration of the Shepherds

Circumcision Presentation Adoration of the Magi Flight into Egypt

Massacre of the Innocents

Return to Nazareth Finding in the Temple

Ministry

Baptism Temptation Commissioning the Twelve Sermon on the Mount
Sermon on the Mount
/ Plain Miracles Parables Rejection Transfiguration

Passion

Triumphal entry into Jerusalem Temple cleansing Second coming prophecy Anointing Last Supper

Farewell Discourse Paraclete
Paraclete
promised

Agony in the Garden

Kiss of Judas Arrest

Sanhedrin trial Mocking Herod's court Pilate's court

Flagellation Crown of Thorns Via Dolorosa

Crucifixion

Descent from the Cross

Entombment Harrowing of Hell

Resurrection

Empty tomb Appearances

Noli me tangere Road to Emmaus Great Commission Ascension

In rest of the NT

Road to Damascus John's vision

Portals: Christianity
Christianity
Bible  Book:Life of Jesus

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Main article: Triumphal entry into Jerusalem

Triumphal entry into Jerusalem, byzantine icon (Cathedral of the Annunciation, Moscow)

In the accounts of the four canonical Gospels, Jesus' triumphal entry into Jerusalem
Jerusalem
takes place a week before his Resurrection.[4][5][6][7] Only the Gospel[8] of John shows a timeline of the event, dated six days before the Passover
Passover
(John 12:1). Before this, Jesus
Jesus
talked to two of his disciples, claiming himself with the Ancient Greek word of Lord[9] (Κύριος, trasl. Kýrios), written with the capital letter in the original text,[10] as it was a proper noun. The raising of Lazarus is referred only by the Gospel of John
Gospel of John
in the previous chapter. The Eastern Orthodox Church
Eastern Orthodox Church
and the Eastern Catholic Churches which follows the Byzantine Rite, commemorates it on the Lazarus Saturday, following the text of the Gospel. Infact, the Jewish calendar dates begins at sundown of the night beforehand, and conclude at nightfall.[11] Christian theologians believe that the symbolism is captured prophetically in the Old Testament: Zechariah 9:9 "The Coming of Zion's King – See, your king comes to you, righteous and victorious, lowly and riding on a donkey, on a colt, the foal of a donkey", which is quoted in the Gospels. It suggests that Jesus
Jesus
was declaring he was the King of Israel
Israel
to the anger of the Sanhedrin. According to the Gospels, Jesus
Jesus
Christ rode a donkey into Jerusalem, and the celebrating people there laid down their cloaks and small branches of trees in front of him, and sang part of Psalm 118: 25–26 – ... Blessed is He who comes in the name of the Lord. We bless you from the house of the Lord ....[2][4][5][6] The symbolism of the donkey may refer to the Eastern tradition that it is an animal of peace, versus the horse, which is the animal of war.[1] A king would have ridden a horse when he was bent on war and ridden a donkey to symbolize his arrival in peace. Jesus' entry to Jerusalem
Jerusalem
would have thus symbolized his entry as the Prince of Peace, not as a war-waging king.[1][2] Thus there has been two different meanings (or more level of biblical hermeneutics): an historical meaning, truely happened according to the Gospels, and a secondary meaning which is the symbolism.

"Flevit super illam" (He wept over it); by Enrique Simonet, 1892.

In Luke 19:41 as Jesus
Jesus
approaches Jerusalem, he looks at the city and weeps over it (an event known as Flevit super illam in Latin), foretelling his next Passion and the suffering that awaits the city in the events of the destruction of the Second Temple. In many lands in the ancient Near East, it was customary to cover in some way the path of someone thought worthy of the highest honour. The Hebrew Bible
Hebrew Bible
(2 Kings 9:13) reports that Jehu, son of Jehoshaphat, was treated this way. Both the Synoptic Gospels
Synoptic Gospels
and the Gospel of John report that people gave Jesus
Jesus
this form of honour. In the synoptics the people are described as laying their garments and cut rushes on the street, whereas John specifies fronds of palm (Greek phoinix). In Jewish tradition, the palm is one of the Four Species
Four Species
carried for Sukkot, as prescribed for rejoicing at Leviticus 23:40. In the Greco-Roman culture of the Roman Empire, which strongly influenced Christian tradition, the palm branch was a symbol of triumph and victory. It became the most common attribute of the goddess Nike or Victory.[12] For contemporary Roman observers, the procession would have evoked the Roman triumph,[13] when the triumphator laid down his arms and wore the toga, the civilian garment of peace that might be ornamented with emblems of the palm.[14] Although the Epistles of Paul
Epistles of Paul
refer to Jesus
Jesus
as "triumphing", the entry into Jerusalem
Jerusalem
may not have been regularly pictured as a triumphal procession in this sense before the 13th century.[15] In ancient Egyptian religion, the palm was carried in funeral processions and represented eternal life. The palm branch later was used as a symbol of Christian martyrs and their spiritual victory or triumph over death.[16] In Revelation 7:9, the white-clad multitude stand before the throne and Lamb holding palm branches.

Observance in the liturgy[edit]

Dates for Palm Sunday 2011–2025 In Gregorian dates

Year Western Eastern

2011 April 17

2012 April 1 April 8

2013 March 24 April 28

2014 April 13

2015 March 29 April 5

2016 March 20 April 24

2017 April 9

2018 March 25 April 1

2019 April 14 April 21

2020 April 5 April 12

2021 March 28 April 25

2022 April 10 April 17

2023 April 2 April 9

2024 March 24 April 28

2025 April 13

Eastern and Oriental Christianity[edit] Palm Sunday, or the "Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem," as it is often called in some Orthodox Churches, is one of the Twelve Great Feasts
Twelve Great Feasts
of the liturgical year. The day before Palm Sunday, Lazarus Saturday, believers often prepare palm fronds by knotting them into crosses in preparation for the procession on Sunday. The hangings and vestments in the church are changed to a festive color – most commonly green. The Troparion
Troparion
of the Feast (a short hymn) indicates that the resurrection of Lazarus is a prefiguration of Jesus's own Resurrection:

O Christ our God When Thou didst raise Lazarus from the dead before Thy Passion, Thou didst confirm the resurrection of the universe. Wherefore, we like children, carry the banner of triumph and victory, and we cry to Thee, O Conqueror of love, Hosanna in the highest! Blessed is He that cometh in the Name of the Lord.

In the Russian Orthodox Church, Ukrainian Orthodox Church, Ukrainian Catholic Church, Ruthenian Catholic Church, Polish, Bavarian and Austrian Roman Catholics, and various other Eastern European peoples, the custom developed of using pussy willow instead of palm fronds because the latter are not readily available that far north. There is no canonical requirement as to what kind of branches must be used, so some Orthodox believers use olive branches. Whatever the kind, these branches are blessed and distributed together with candles either during the All-Night Vigil on the Eve of the Feast (Saturday night), or before the Divine Liturgy
Divine Liturgy
on Sunday
Sunday
morning. The Great Entrance
Great Entrance
of the Divine Liturgy
Divine Liturgy
commemorates the "Entry of the Lord into Jerusalem", so the meaningfulness of this moment is punctuated on Palm Sunday
Sunday
as everyone stands, holding their branches and lit candles. The faithful take these branches and candles home with them after the service, and keep them in their icon corner as an evloghia (blessing). In Russia, donkey walk processions took place in different cities, but most importantly in Novgorod
Novgorod
and, since 1558 until 1693, in Moscow. It was prominently featured in testimonies by foreign witnesses and mentioned in contemporary Western maps of the city. The Patriarch of Moscow, representing Christ, rode on a "donkey" (actually a horse draped in white cloth); the Tsar of Russia
Tsar of Russia
humbly led the procession on foot. Originally, Moscow processions began inside the Kremlin and terminated at Trinity Church, now known as Saint Basil's Cathedral, but in 1658 Patriarch Nikon
Patriarch Nikon
reversed the order of procession. Peter I, as a part of his nationalisation of the church, terminated the custom; it has been occasionally recreated in the 21st century. In Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
churches, palm fronds are distributed at the front of the church at the sanctuary steps, in India the sanctuary itself having been strewn with marigolds, and the congregation proceeds through and outside the church.

The Palm Sunday
Sunday
in Eastern and Oriental Christianity

Palm Sunday
Sunday
procession, Moscow, with Tsar Alexei Michaelovich (painting by Vyacheslav Schwarz, 1865)

Palm Sunday
Sunday
in Moscow, 1654. Caption on the illustration: Abrieß der Muscowitischen Prozession am Palmsontag

The congregation in an Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
church in India collects palm fronds for the Palm Sunday
Sunday
procession (the men of the congregation on the left of the sanctuary in the photo; the women of the congregation are collecting their fronds on the right of the sanctuary, outside the photo).

Eastern Orthodox
Eastern Orthodox
fresco in Nativity of the Theotokos Church, Bitola, Republic of Macedonia

Western Christianity[edit] In ancient times, palm branches symbolized goodness and victory. They were often depicted on coins and important buildings. Solomon had palm branches carved into the walls and doors of the temple (1 Kings 6:29). Again at the end of the Bible, people from every nation raise palm branches to honor Jesus
Jesus
(Revelation 7:9). Palm Sunday
Sunday
commemorates the entrance of Jesus
Jesus
into Jerusalem
Jerusalem
(Matthew 21:1–9), when palm branches were placed in his path, before his arrest on Holy Thursday and his crucifixion on Good Friday. It thus marks the beginning of Holy Week, the final week of Lent. In the Roman Catholic Church, as well as among many Anglican
Anglican
and Lutheran
Lutheran
congregations, palm fronds (or in colder climates some kind of substitutes) are blessed with an aspergillum outside the church building in an event called the "blessing of palms" if using palm leaves (or in cold climates in the narthex when Easter
Easter
falls early in the year). A solemn procession also takes place, and may include the normal liturgical procession of clergy and acolytes, the parish choir, or the entire congregation. In the Catholic Church
Catholic Church
and the Episcopal Church, this feast now coincides with that of Passion Sunday, which is the focus of the Mass which follows the service of the blessing of palms. The palms are saved in many churches to be burned on Shrove Tuesday
Shrove Tuesday
the following year to make ashes used in Ash Wednesday
Ash Wednesday
services. The Catholic Church considers the blessed palms to be sacramentals. The vestments for the day are deep scarlet red, the colour of blood, indicating the supreme redemptive sacrifice Christ was entering the city to fulfill: his Passion and Resurrection in Jerusalem.

Blessing
Blessing
of palms outside an Episcopal Church in the United States.

In the Episcopal and many other Anglican
Anglican
churches and in Lutheran churches, as well, the day is nowadays officially called "The Sunday of the Passion: Palm Sunday"; in practice, though, it is usually termed "Palm Sunday" as in the 1928 American Book
Book
of Common Prayer and in earlier Lutheran
Lutheran
liturgies and calendars, to avoid undue confusion with the penultimate Sunday
Sunday
of Lent
Lent
in the traditional calendar, which was "Passion Sunday". In the Church of Pakistan (a member of the Anglican
Anglican
Communion), the faithful on Palm Sunday
Sunday
carry palm branches into the church as they sing Psalm 24. In many Protestant churches, children are given palms, and then walk in procession around the inside of the church .[citation needed] In traditional usage of the Methodist Church, The Book
Book
of Worship for Church and Home (1965) provides the following Collect
Collect
for Palm Sunday:[17]

Almighty and everlasting God, who, of thy tender love toward mankind hast sent thy Son our Savior Jesus
Jesus
Christ to take upon him our flesh, and to suffer death upon the cross, that all mankind should follow the example of his great humility: Mercifully grant that we may both follow the example of his patience and also be made partakers of his resurrection; through the same Jesus
Jesus
Christ our Lord. Amen.[17]

In Spanish, it is sometimes called Pascua florida, and it was from this day in 1512 that the state of Florida received its name.[18] Customs[edit]

Part of a series on

Death and Resurrection of Jesus

Passion

Last Supper Arrest Trial

Pilate's court Flagellation Mocking Crown of thorns Via Dolorosa

Crucifixion and Death Burial Resurrection

Empty tomb

Appearances

Noli me tangere Road to Emmaus Great Commission Ascension

Hypotheses

Instrument of crucifixion Resurrection Stolen body Swoon Vision Lost body

Holy Week

Palm Sunday Maundy Thursday Good Friday Holy Saturday Easter
Easter
Sunday

Related

Substitutionary atonement Crucifixion darkness Roza Bal Talpiot Tomb Islamic view

Portals: Christianity
Christianity
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It is customary in many churches for worshippers to receive fresh palm leaves on Palm Sunday. In parts of the world where this has historically been impractical, substitute traditions have arisen. Belgium[edit] In Hoegaarden, one of the last remaining Palm Sunday
Sunday
processions takes place every year. A fellowship of Twelve Apostles carries a wooden statue of Christ around the town, while children go door to door offering the palms (box) for coins.[citation needed][19] Bulgaria[edit] In Bulgaria, Palm Sunday
Sunday
is known as Tsvetnitsa (tsvete, "flower") or Vrabnitsa (varba, "willow"), or Flower's Day. People with flower-related names (e.g., Lilia, Margarita, Nevena, Ralitsa, Rosa, Temenuzhka, Tsvetan, Tsvetana, Tsvetelin, Tsvetelina, Tsvetko, Violeta, Yavor, Zdravko, Zjumbjul, etc.) celebrate this day as their name day.[citation needed] England[edit] In the 15th through the 17th centuries in England, Palm Sunday
Sunday
was frequently marked by the burning of Jack-'o'- Lent
Lent
figures. This was a straw effigy which would be stoned and abused on Ash Wednesday, and kept in the parish for burning on Palm Sunday. The symbolism was believed to be a kind of revenge on Judas Iscariot, who had betrayed Christ. The effigy could also have represented the hated figure of Winter, whose destruction prepares the way for Spring.[20] Ethiopia[edit] In Orthodox Ethiopia, this holiday is referred to as Hosanna. Palm leaves are used to create crucifixes, rings and other ornaments. Finland[edit]

Easter
Easter
witches in Finland.

In Finland, it is popular for children to dress up as Easter
Easter
witches and go door to door in neighborhoods and trade decorated pussy willow branches for coins and candy. This is an old Karelian custom called virpominen. It is customary for the children to chant, with some variation, "Virvon varvon tuoreeks, terveeks, tulevaks vuodeks, vitsa sulle, palkka mulle!"[21] which translates as "I'm wishing you a fresh, healthy upcoming year, a branch for you, a prize for me!" The chant has been translated in Juha Vuorinen's novel Totally Smashed! as " Willow
Willow
switch, I'm the Easter
Easter
witch! I wish you health and a love that's rich! From me I bring some luck today, for this branch what will you pay?"[22] India[edit] In most of the Catholic Churches in India the Palms are blessed by the Priest on Palm Sunday
Sunday
and then distributed among the people after the Holy Mass. There is a tradition of folding Palm Fronds
Fronds
into Palm Crosses which are kept at the altar till the next Ash Wednesday.

Flowers (in this instance marigolds) strewn about the sanctuary in an Oriental Orthodox
Oriental Orthodox
church in Mumbai, India on Palm Sunday.

In the South Indian state of Kerala
Kerala
(and in Indian Orthodox, Church of South India
South India
(CSI), Syro-Malankara Catholic Church, and Syriac Orthodox Church (Jacobite) congregations elsewhere in India and throughout the West), flowers are strewn about the sanctuary on Palm Sunday
Sunday
during the reading of the Gospel, at the words uttered by the crowd welcoming Jesus, "Hosanna! Blessed is he who is come and is to come in the name of the Lord God". These words are read to the congregation thrice. The congregation then repeats, "Hosanna!", and the flowers are scattered. This is adapted from the older Hindu
Hindu
custom of scattering flowers on festive occasions, as well as the honour shown to Jesus
Jesus
upon his entry into Jerusalem. Indian Orthodoxy traces its roots to the arrival in India of Saint Thomas the Apostle
Thomas the Apostle
(traditionally dated to AD 52) and his evangelism among both the Brahmans of the Malabar Coast
Malabar Coast
and the ancient Jewish community there. Its rites and ceremonies are both Hindu
Hindu
and Jewish, as well as Levantine Christian, in origin. In Syro-Malabar Catholic Church's palm leaves are blessed during Palm Sunday
Sunday
ceremony and a Procession
Procession
takes place holding the palms.[23] There is no actual proof that Saint Thomas visited the Malabar Coast
Malabar Coast
or converted the Brahmans. The Vatican has not categorically stated that Saint Thomas visited India. Italy[edit] In Italy, palm leaves are used along with small olive branches, readily available in the Mediterranean climate. These are placed at house entrances (for instance, hanging above the door) to last until the following year's Palm Sunday. For this reason, usually palm leaves are not used whole, due to their size; instead, leaf strips are braided into smaller shapes. Small olive branches are also often used to decorate traditional Easter
Easter
cakes, along with other symbols of birth, like eggs.[citation needed] Latvia[edit] In Latvia, Palm Sunday
Sunday
is called "Pussy Willow
Willow
Sunday", and pussy willows – symbolizing new life – are blessed and distributed to the faithful.[24] Children are often awakened that morning with ritualistic swats of a willow branch.[citation needed] Lithuania[edit] When Christianity
Christianity
came to Lithuania, the plants which sprouted earliest were honored during spring feasts. The name "Palm Sunday" is a misnomer; the "verba" or "dwarfed spuce" is used instead. According to tradition, on the Saturday before Palm Sunday
Sunday
the Lithuanians take special care in choosing and cutting well-formed branches, which the women-folk decorate with flowers. The flowers are meticulously tied onto the branches, making the "Verba".[citation needed] The Levant[edit] In Israel, Jordan, Lebanon, Palestine, and Syria, Palm Sunday (Shaa'nineh in Arabic) Is perhaps the best-attended service in the Christian Calendar, among the Orthodox, Catholic ( Latin Church
Latin Church
and Eastern Catholic Churches), and Anglican
Anglican
Churches, perhaps because it is notably a family occasion.[citation needed] On this day, children attend church with branches from olive and palm trees. Also, there will be carefully woven crosses and other symbols made from palm fronds and roses and a procession at the beginning of the service, during which at some point, the priest will take an olive branch and splash holy water on the faithful.[citation needed] Malta[edit] All the parishes of Malta
Malta
and Gozo
Gozo
on Palm Sunday
Sunday
(Maltese: Ħadd il-Palm) bless the palm leaves and the olive leaves. Those parishes that have the statues of Good Friday
Good Friday
bless the olive tree they put on the statues of " Jesus
Jesus
prays in the Olive
Olive
Garden" (Ġesù fl-Ort) and the "Betrayal of Judas" (il-Bewsa ta' Ġuda). Also, many people take a small olive branch to their homes because it is a sacramental.[citation needed] Netherlands[edit] In the Saxon regions of the Netherlands, crosses are decorated with candy and bread, made in the form of a rooster. In the Diocese of Groningen-Leeuwarden, a great procession with oil lamps is held the night before Palm Sunday
Sunday
in honour of the Sorrowful Mother of Warfhuizen.[citation needed] Philippines[edit] See also: Holy Week
Holy Week
in the Philippines

A priest blesses palm fronds in Santiago Apostol Church in Plaridel, Bulacan, Philippines.

In the Philippines, communities re-enact Jesus' triumphal entry with a procession. A statue of Christ riding a donkey (the Humenta), or the officiating priest on horseback, is brought to the local church by congregants, who wave palaspás (ornately woven palm branches). At houses and chapels, white-clad children scatter flowers as they sing the antiphon Hosanna Filio David in the vernacular and to traditional tunes. Tapis (heirloom "aprons" made for this ritual) or large cloths are spread along the processional route, to be tread upon by the Humenta or the priest. Once blessed, the palaspás are brought home and placed on altars, doorways, and windows. The Church teaches that this is meant to welcome Christ, but many Filipinos believe blessed palaspás to be apotropaic, deterring evil spirits, lightning, and fires. Another folk custom is to feed pieces of blessed palaspás to roosters used in sabong (cockfighting); this was strongly discouraged by the Archbishop of Manila, Cardinal Luis Antonio Tagle.[citation needed] In other provinces, the flowers strewn by the angels during the procession are added to the rice seeds being planted, in the belief that these will ensure a bountiful harvest. Poland[edit]

A palm in Łyse, Poland.

Many Polish towns and villages (the best known are Lipnica Murowana
Lipnica Murowana
in Lesser Poland
Poland
and Łyse) organize artificial palm competitions. The biggest of those reach above 30 meters in length; for example, the highest palm in 2008 was 33.39 meters.[25] Romania
Romania
and Moldova[edit] In Romania
Romania
and Moldova, Palm Sunday
Sunday
is known as Duminica Floriilor or simply Florii, translating Flowers' Sunday.[citation needed] Spain[edit] See also: Holy Week
Holy Week
in Spain In Spain, there is a tradition at the Palmeral of Elche (Europe's largest Palm Grove) where local people cover palm leaves from the sun to allow them to whiten, and then they tie and braid them in to intricate shapes. [26] A Spanish rhyming proverb states: Domingo de Ramos, quien no estrena algo, se le caen las manos ("On Palm Sunday, the hands drop off of those who fail to wear something new"). On Palm Sunday, it is customary to don new clothing or shoes.[27] Syria[edit] In Syria, it is popular for children to dress up as Easter
Easter
witches and go door to door in neighborhoods for coins and candy

Palm Day Syria

Wales[edit] In Welsh Palm Sunday
Sunday
in called 'Sul y Blodau' ('Flowering Sunday') and it is traditional to decorate graves with flowers on that day, especially in the industrial towns and villages of south Wales. See also[edit]

Christianity
Christianity
portal Holidays portal

Crucifixion eclipse Palm branch (symbol) Palm Sunday
Sunday
church bombings

References[edit]

^ a b c Matthew 19–28 by William David Davies, Dale C. Allison 2004 ISBN 0-567-08375-6 page 120 ^ a b c John 12–21 by John MacArthur 2008 ISBN 978-0-8024-0824-2 pages 17–18 ^ Mark 11:1–11, Matthew 21:1–11, Luke 19:28–44, and John 12:12–19. ^ a b The people's New Testament
New Testament
commentary by M. Eugene Boring, Fred B. Craddock 2004 ISBN 0-664-22754-6 pages 256–258 ^ a b The Bible Knowledge Background Commentary: Matthew–Luke, Volume 1 by Craig A. Evans 2003 ISBN 0-7814-3868-3 page 381-395 ^ a b The Synoptics: Matthew, Mark, Luke by Ján Majerník, Joseph Ponessa, Laurie Watson Manhardt 2005 ISBN 1-931018-31-6 pages 133–134 ^ The Bible knowledge background commentary: John's Gospel, Hebrews–Revelation by Craig A. Evans ISBN 0-7814-4228-1 pages 114–118 ^ Matthew 21:1–11, Mark 11:1–11, Luke 19:28–44, John 12:1–19 ^ Mark 11:3-4; Luke 19:3,34; Matthew 21:3 ^ Gospel of Mark, chapter 11, with Greek interlinear text on Biblehub.com. URL Retrieved on April 5, 2018. ^ "When Is Passover
Passover
in 2018, 2019, 2020 and 2021?". Archived from the original on 18 March 2018. Retrieved 2 April 2018.  ^ Reidar Hvalvik, "Christ Proclaiming His Law to the Apostles: The Traditio Legis-Motif in Early Christian Art and Literature," in The New Testament
New Testament
and Early Christian Literature in Greco-Roman Context: Studies in Honor of David E. Aune (Brill, 2006), p. 432; Guillermo Galán Vioque, Martial, Book
Book
VII: A Commentary, translated by J.J. Zoltowski (Brill 2002), pp. 61, 206, 411; Anna Clark, Divine Qualities: Cult and Community in Republican Rome (Oxford University Press, 2007), p. 162. ^ Warren W. Wiersbe, The Wiersbe Bible Commentary (David C. Cook, 2007), p. 272. ^ Vioque, Martial, Book
Book
VII: A Commentary, p. 61. ^ John Pairman Brown, Israel
Israel
and Hellas (De Gruyter, 2000), vol. 2, pp. 254ff. ^ Fernando Lanzi and Gioia Lanzi, Saints and Their Symbols: Recognizing Saints in Art and in Popular Images (Liturgical Press, 2004), p. 25. ^ a b The Book
Book
of Worship for Church and Home: With Orders of Worship, Services for the Administration of the Sacraments and Other Aids to Worship According to the Usages of the Methodist Church. Methodist Publishing House. 1964. p. 101. Retrieved 25 March 2017.  ^ Mershman, Francis. "Palm Sunday." The Catholic Encyclopedia
Catholic Encyclopedia
Vol. 11. New York: Robert Appleton Company, 1911. 24 March 2018 ^ Towers), Cooper, Gordon (Charles Gordon (1994). Festivals of Europe. Detroit: Omnigraphics. ISBN 9780780800052. OCLC 28422673.  ^ Frood & Graves p. 10 ^ Väänänen, Vuokko (March 21, 2016). "Virvon varvon tuoreeks terveeks…". Värtsilän verkkolehti. Värtsilän verkkolehti. Retrieved September 25, 2017.  ^ Vuorinen, Juha (2017). Totally Smashed!. Translated by Leonard Pearl. Diktaatori. p. 165. ISBN 978-9525474756.  ^ "NATIONAL / KERALA : Traditional services mark Palm Sunday". The Hindu. 2011-04-18. Retrieved 2012-06-10.  ^ "Archives". Mirabilis.ca. June 2012. Archived from the original on 27 October 2007.  ^ "The Easter
Easter
Palm Sunday
Sunday
- :". Realpoland.eu. Retrieved 2018-04-05.  ^ "The city of Elche, known for its arts and crafts tradition, in Spain is Culture". Spainisculture.com. Retrieved 2018-04-05.  ^ "Palm Sunday". New World Encyclopedia. Retrieved 2018-04-05. 

Bibliography[edit]

Frood, J. D.; Graves, M. A. R. (1992). Seasons and Ceremonies: Tudor-Stuart England. Elizabethan Promotions.  Вход Господень в Иерусалим. Богослужебные указания для священнослужителей. (Составитель протоиерей Виталий Грищук) – СПб.: Санкт-Петербургская православная духовная академия, 2013г. (в формате iBooks).

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Palm Sunday.

An Order of Service for Palm Sunday Learn how to make a cross out of palms Palm Sunday
Sunday
(Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of Australia) Palm Sunday
Sunday
according to the Byzantine Rite
Byzantine Rite
Tradition Palm Sunday
Sunday
2015  Herbermann, Charles, ed. (1913). "Palm Sunday". Catholic Encyclopedia. New York: Robert Appleton Company. 

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Easter
Epic Ecclesiastical new moon Paschal Full Moon Pussy willow Reform of the date of Easter

Related events

Divine Mercy Sunday Easter
Easter
Monday Easter
Easter
Tuesday Easter
Easter
Wednesday Easter
Easter
Thursday Easter
Easter
Friday Easter
Easter
Saturday Eastertide Easter
Easter
Triduum Easter
Easter
Week Good Friday Holy Saturday Maundy Thursday Mid-Pentecost Octave of Easter Palm Sunday Pentecost Pre-Lenten Season Trinity Sunday

Society

Ēostre Maslenitsa Salzburg Easter
Easter
Festival

v t e

Liturgical year
Liturgical year
of the Catholic Church

Based on the General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
(1969)

Advent

Advent
Advent
Sunday Immaculate Conception^ Gaudete Sunday (O Antiphons)

Christmastide

Christmas
Christmas
(Nativity of Jesus)^ Holy Family Solemnity
Solemnity
of Mary, Mother of God^ Epiphany^ Baptism of the Lord

Ordinary Time
Ordinary Time
I

Presentation of Jesus at the Temple
Presentation of Jesus at the Temple
(Candlemas) Feast of the Annunciation (Carnival)

Lent

Ash Wednesday Saint Joseph's Day^ Laetare Sunday Holy Week: Palm Sunday, Holy Wednesday, Maundy Thursday
Maundy Thursday
(Mass of the Chrism)

Paschal Triduum

Maundy Thursday
Maundy Thursday
(Mass of the Lord's Supper) Good Friday

Liturgy of the Word, Adoration of the Cross, Holy Communion

Holy Saturday Easter
Easter
Vigil

Eastertide

Easter
Easter
Sunday: Resurrection of Jesus Octave of Easter
Easter
(Divine Mercy Sunday) Feast of the Ascension^ Pentecost

Ordinary Time
Ordinary Time
II

Trinity Sunday Corpus Christi^ Sacred Heart Visitation of Mary Saint John the Baptist Feast of Saints Peter and Paul^ Transfiguration of Jesus Assumption of Mary^ Nativity of Mary Feast of the Cross All Saints' Day^ All Souls' Day Presentation of Mary Feast of Christ the King

Legend ^ = Holy days of obligation (10) Catholicism portal See also: Computus Liturgical colours Solemnity

Older calendars: General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
of 1960 General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
of Pope Pius XII of 1950 General Roman Calendar
General Roman Calendar
of 1954 Tridentine Calendar

v t e

Holidays, observances, and celebrations in the United States

January

New Year's Day
New Year's Day
(federal) Martin Luther King Jr. Day
Martin Luther King Jr. Day
(federal)

Confederate Heroes Day (TX) Fred Korematsu Day
Fred Korematsu Day
(CA, FL, HI, VA) Idaho Human Rights Day (ID) Inauguration Day (federal quadrennial, DC area) Kansas Day (KS) Lee–Jackson Day
Lee–Jackson Day
(formerly Lee–Jackson–King Day) (VA) Robert E. Lee Day
Robert E. Lee Day
(FL) Stephen Foster Memorial Day (36) The Eighth (LA, former federal)

January–February

Super Bowl Sunday

February American Heart Month Black History Month

Washington's Birthday/Presidents' Day (federal) Valentine's Day

Georgia Day (GA) Groundhog Day Lincoln's Birthday
Lincoln's Birthday
(CA, CT, IL, IN, MO, NJ, NY, WV) National Girls and Women in Sports Day National Freedom Day (36) Primary Election Day (WI) Ronald Reagan Day
Ronald Reagan Day
(CA) Rosa Parks Day
Rosa Parks Day
(CA, MO) Susan B. Anthony Day
Susan B. Anthony Day
(CA, FL, NY, WI, WV, proposed federal)

February–March

Mardi Gras

Ash Wednesday
Ash Wednesday
(religious) Courir de Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras
(religious) Super Tuesday

March Irish-American Heritage Month National Colon Cancer Awareness Month Women's History Month

St. Patrick's Day (religious) Spring break
Spring break
(week)

Casimir Pulaski Day
Casimir Pulaski Day
(IL) Cesar Chavez Day
Cesar Chavez Day
(CA, CO, TX, proposed federal) Evacuation Day (Suffolk County, MA) Harriet Tubman Day
Harriet Tubman Day
(NY) Holi
Holi
(NY, religious) Mardi Gras
Mardi Gras
(AL (in two counties), LA) Maryland Day
Maryland Day
(MD) National Poison Prevention Week
National Poison Prevention Week
(week) Prince Jonah Kūhiō Kalanianaʻole Day (HI) Saint Joseph's Day
Saint Joseph's Day
(religious) Seward's Day (AK) Texas Independence Day
Texas Independence Day
(TX) Town Meeting Day (VT)

March–April

Easter
Easter
(religious)

Palm Sunday
Sunday
(religious) Passover
Passover
(religious) Good Friday
Good Friday
(CT, NC, PR, religious) Easter
Easter
Monday (religious)

April Confederate History Month

420 Day April Fools' Day Arbor Day Confederate Memorial Day
Confederate Memorial Day
(AL, MS) Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust
Days of Remembrance of the Victims of the Holocaust
(week) Earth Day Emancipation Day
Emancipation Day
(DC) Thomas Jefferson's Birthday
Jefferson's Birthday
(AL) Pascua Florida (FL) Patriots' Day
Patriots' Day
(MA, ME) San Jacinto Day
San Jacinto Day
(TX) Siblings Day Walpurgis Night
Walpurgis Night
(religious)

May Asian Pacific American Heritage Month Jewish American Heritage Month

Memorial Day
Memorial Day
(federal) Mother's Day (36) Cinco de Mayo

Harvey Milk Day
Harvey Milk Day
(CA) Law Day (36) Loyalty Day (36) Malcolm X Day
Malcolm X Day
(CA, IL, proposed federal) May Day Military Spouse Day National Day of Prayer
National Day of Prayer
(36) National Defense Transportation Day (36) National Maritime Day (36) Peace Officers Memorial Day
Memorial Day
(36) Truman Day
Truman Day
(MO)

June Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Pride Month

Father's Day (36)

Bunker Hill Day
Bunker Hill Day
(Suffolk County, MA) Carolina Day
Carolina Day
(SC) Emancipation Day
Emancipation Day
In Texas / Juneteenth
Juneteenth
(TX) Flag Day (36, proposed federal) Helen Keller Day
Helen Keller Day
(PA) Honor America Days (3 weeks) Jefferson Davis Day
Jefferson Davis Day
(AL, FL) Kamehameha Day
Kamehameha Day
(HI) Odunde Festival
Odunde Festival
(Philadelphia, PA) Senior Week (week) West Virginia Day
West Virginia Day
(WV)

July

Independence Day (federal)

Lā Hoʻihoʻi Ea (HI, unofficial) Parents' Day
Parents' Day
(36) Pioneer Day (UT)

July–August

Summer vacation

August

American Family Day (AZ) Barack Obama Day
Barack Obama Day
(IL) Bennington Battle Day (VT) Hawaii Admission Day / Statehood Day (HI) Lyndon Baines Johnson Day
Lyndon Baines Johnson Day
(TX) National Aviation Day
National Aviation Day
(36) Service Reduction Day (MD) Victory over Japan Day (RI, former federal) Women's Equality Day
Women's Equality Day
(36)

September Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

Labor Day
Labor Day
(federal)

California Admission Day
California Admission Day
(CA) Carl Garner Federal Lands Cleanup Day (36) Constitution Day (36) Constitution Week (week) Defenders Day
Defenders Day
(MD) Gold Star Mother's Day
Gold Star Mother's Day
(36) National Grandparents Day
National Grandparents Day
(36) National Payroll Week (week) Native American Day (CA, TN, proposed federal) Patriot Day
Patriot Day
(36)

September–October Hispanic Heritage Month

Oktoberfest

Rosh Hashanah
Rosh Hashanah
(religious) Yom Kippur
Yom Kippur
(religious)

October Breast Cancer Awareness Month Disability Employment Awareness Month Filipino American History Month LGBT History Month

Columbus Day
Columbus Day
(federal) Halloween

Alaska Day (AK) Child Health Day (36) General Pulaski Memorial Day German-American Day Indigenous Peoples' Day
Indigenous Peoples' Day
(VT) International Day of Non-Violence Leif Erikson Day
Leif Erikson Day
(36) Missouri Day (MO) National School Lunch Week Native American Day (SD) Nevada Day
Nevada Day
(NV) Sweetest Day White Cane Safety Day
White Cane Safety Day
(36)

October–November

Diwali
Diwali
(religious)

November Native American Indian Heritage Month

Veterans Day
Veterans Day
(federal) Thanksgiving (federal)

Day after Thanksgiving (24) Election Day (CA, DE, HI, KY, MT, NJ, NY, OH, PR, WV, proposed federal) Family Day (NV) Hanukkah
Hanukkah
(religious) Lā Kūʻokoʻa (HI, unofficial) Native American Heritage Day (MD, WA) Obama Day
Obama Day
(Perry County, AL)

December

Christmas
Christmas
(religious, federal)

Alabama Day (AL) Christmas
Christmas
Eve (KY, NC, SC) Day after Christmas
Christmas
(KY, NC, SC, TX) Festivus Hanukkah
Hanukkah
(religious, week) Indiana Day
Indiana Day
(IN) Kwanzaa
Kwanzaa
(religious, week) National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
National Pearl Harbor Remembrance Day
(36) New Year's Eve Pan American Aviation Day (36) Rosa Parks Day
Rosa Parks Day
(OH, OR) Wright Brothers Day (36)

Varies (year round)

Eid al-Adha
Eid al-Adha
(religious) Eid al-Fitr
Eid al-Fitr
(religious) Ramadan
Ramadan
(religious, month)

Legend: (federal) = federal holidays, (state) = state holidays, (religious) = religious holidays, (week) = weeklong holidays, (month) = monthlong holidays, (36) = Title 36 Observances and Ceremonies Bold indicates major holidays commonly celebrated in the United States, which often represent the major celebrations of the month. See also: Lists of holidays, Hallmark holidays, public holidays in the United States, New Jersey, New York, Puerto Rico and the United Stat

.