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National Grandparents Day
National Grandparents Day
is a secular holiday celebrated in the United States of America
United States of America
since 1978 and officially recognized in a number of countries on various days of the year, either as one holiday or sometimes as a separate Grandmothers' Day and Grandfathers' Day (for the first time Grandma's Day was celebrated in Poland
Poland
in 1965,[1]see below for dates by country). One celebrates both paternal and maternal grandparents.

Contents

1 History 2 Music of the U.S.A. National Grandparents Day 3 Flower of U.S. National Grandparents Day 4 Grandparents' Day[s] around the world

4.1 Australia 4.2 Canada 4.3 Estonia 4.4 France 4.5 Germany 4.6 Hong Kong 4.7 Italy 4.8 Mexico 4.9 Poland 4.10 Singapore 4.11 South Sudan 4.12 Spain 4.13 Taiwan 4.14 United Kingdom 4.15 United States

5 References 6 External links

History[edit] Marian McQuade of Oak Hill, West Virginia, has been recognized nationally by the United States Senate
United States Senate
– in particular by Senators Jennings Randolph;[2] and Robert Byrd – and by President Jimmy Carter, as the founder of National Grandparents Day. McQuade made it her goal to educate the youth in the community[clarification needed] about the important contributions seniors have made throughout history. She also urged the youth to "adopt" a grandparent, not just for one day a year, but rather for a lifetime. Co-founder Cynthia Bennett, who worked for Marian's husband, contributed by writing letters of verification. In 1973, Senator Jennings Randolph
Jennings Randolph
(D-WV) introduced a resolution to the senate to make Grandparents' Day a national holiday. West Virginia's Governor Arch Moore had proclaimed an annual Grandparents' Day for the state, at the urging of Marian McQuade. When Senator Randolph's resolution in the U.S. Senate died in committee, Marian McQuade organized supporters and began contacting governors, senators, and congressmen in all fifty states. She urged each state to proclaim their own Grandparents' Day. Within three years, she had received Grandparents' Day proclamations from forty-three states. She sent copies of the proclamations to Senator Randolph.[citation needed] In February 1977, Senator Randolph, with the concurrence of many other senators, introduced a joint resolution to the senate requesting the president to "issue annually a proclamation designating the first Sunday of September after Labor Day
Labor Day
of each year as 'National Grandparents' Day'." Congress passed the legislation proclaiming the first Sunday after Labor Day
Labor Day
as National Grandparents' Day and, on August 3, 1978, then-President Jimmy Carter
Jimmy Carter
signed the proclamation.[3][4] The statute cites the day's purpose: "...to honor grandparents, to give grandparents an opportunity to show love for their children's children, and to help children become aware of strength, information, and guidance older people can offer". Music of the U.S.A. National Grandparents Day[edit]

A Song for Grandma and Grandpa

Sample of A Song for Grandma and Grandpa.

Problems playing this file? See media help.

In 2004, the National Grandparents Day
National Grandparents Day
Council of Chula Vista, California announced that A Song for Grandma and Grandpa by Johnny Prill would be their official song of the U.S. National Grandparents Day holiday.[5][6][7] The National Grandparents' Day Council presented Prill with an award in recognition of his composition: A Song for Grandma and Grandpa.[8] Flower of U.S. National Grandparents Day[edit]

Forget-me-not

The flower of the U.S. National Grandparents Day
National Grandparents Day
is the forget-me-not which blooms in the spring. As a result, seasonal flowers are given in appreciation to grandparents on this day.[citation needed] Grandparents' Day[s] around the world[edit]

This section needs expansion with: Surely missing many countries. See sidebar - interwiki links may hint at needed additions.. You can help by adding to it. (September 2010)

Australia[edit] The state Queensland
Queensland
celebrates Grandparents' Day on the first Sunday in October.[9] New South Wales held their first Grandparents' Day on Sunday 30 October 2011, and will celebrate it each year on the last Sunday of October. This year's Grandparents' Day is being led by Council on the Ageing NSW (COTA NSW). The Australian Capital Territory and Western Australia held their first Grandparents' Day in 2012. Canada[edit] National Grandparents' Day began in Canada
Canada
in 1995 but was discontinued in 2014. Motion number 273 submitted in the House of Commons by Mr. Sarkis Assadourian
Sarkis Assadourian
read:

That, in the opinion of this House, the government should consider designating the second Sunday in September of each year as Grandparents' Day in order to acknowledge their importance to the structure of the family in the nurturing, upbringing and education of children.[10]

Estonia[edit] In Estonia, Grandparents' Day (Vanavanemate päev) is celebrated on the second Sunday in September.[11] France[edit] In France, Grandmothers' Day (La fête des grands-mères) was launched in 1987 by a brand of coffee (Café Grand'Mère), part of the Kraft Jacobs Suchard Group. The date is now included in French calendars and is celebrated on the first Sunday in March.[12] Germany[edit] In Germany, Grandmothers' Day was established in 2010 and is celebrated on the second Sunday in October.[citation needed] Hong Kong[edit] Junior Chamber International Victoria introduced the first Grandparents' Day in Hong Kong
Hong Kong
in 1990. It is celebrated on the second Sunday in October. Italy[edit] In Italy, Grandparents' Day (officially Festa Nazionale dei Nonni, "National Grandparents' Feast") was established in 2005 and is celebrated on October 2,[13] Guardian Angels' Day in the Roman Catholic Church. Mexico[edit] In Mexico, Grandparents' Day (Spanish: Día del Abuelo) is celebrated on August 28. Poland[edit] In Poland, "Grandma's Day" (Polish: Dzień Babci) was created in 1964 by the Kobieta i Życie magazine, and popularized from 1965 onwards. It is celebrated on January 21. "Grandpa's Day" (Polish: Dzień Dziadka) is celebrated a day later, on January 22.[14] Singapore[edit] Singapore
Singapore
started celebrating Grandparents' Day in 1979, a year after the U.S. started. It is celebrated on the fourth Sunday in November. South Sudan[edit] South Sudan
South Sudan
started celebrating Grandparents' Day in 2013 and celebrated on the 2nd Sunday in November. Spain[edit] In Spain, Grandparents' Day (Spanish: Día del Abuelo) is celebrated on July 26, the feast day of Saint Joachim
Saint Joachim
and Saint Anne, parents of Mary, the mother of Jesus. Taiwan[edit] The Ministry of Education (Republic of China)
Ministry of Education (Republic of China)
initiated Grandparents' Day (祖父母節, Zǔfùmǔ Jié) in Taiwan
Taiwan
on 29 August 2010, on the last Sunday in August annually, shortly before schoolchildren would start a new semester.[15] United Kingdom[edit] The celebration was introduced to the UK in 1990 by the charity Age Concern. It has been celebrated on the first Sunday in October since 2008,[16] although it is not widely advertised and has not been as commercially successful as Mother's and Father's Day. Businesses specialising in gifts and greeting cards have started merging the respective grandparents days with Mother's Day
Mother's Day
and Father's Day
Father's Day
to try to boost sales. United States[edit] National Grandparents' Day in the U.S. is the first Sunday after Labor Day, in September. References[edit]

^ "Dzień Babci wymyślono w Poznaniu". wp.pl. Retrieved 2014-01-21.  ^ Congressional Record, February 21, 1977, Joint Resolution S.J. Res. 24, 95th Congress, 1st Session ^ Jimmy Carter: Proclamation
Proclamation
4580 - National Grandparents Day, 1950 ^ Carter, Jimmy. Greeting to Johnny Prill. 2010. National Grandparents Day. Web. <http://www.nationalgrandparentsday.com/PresidentJimmyCarter.html>. ^ "Gratitude for grandparents". The Roanoke Times. 2014-09-04. Archived from the original on 2015-01-13. Retrieved 2015-01-13. It is appropriate, then, that the official flower of Grandparents Day is the forget-me-not. “A Song for Grandma and Grandpa,” written by Johnny Prill, was named the official song of the holiday in 2004.  ^ Coleman, Marilyn J.; Ganong, Lawrence H. (2014). The Social History of the American Family: An Encyclopedia. Sage Publications. p. 641. ISBN 1452286159. Retrieved 2015-01-21. Since 2004, there has been an official Grandparents Day song, "A Song for Grandma and Grandpa", by Johnny Prill, a singer-songwriter in the folk-polka traditions and a lifelong volunteer performer at nursing homes.  ^ Barber, Lorin (2011). 28 Tips to Become a Great Grandpa. Cedar Fort, Inc. p. 36. ISBN 1462100554. Retrieved 2015-01-21. For example, the first Sunday after Labor Day
Labor Day
is designated "Grandparents Day" in the United States. The official "Grandparents Day" has an official song, "A Song for Grandma and Grandpa," and an official flower, the forget-me-not.  ^ National Grandparents Council. Johnny Prill Wins National Songwriter's Award. National Grandparents Day. 14 August 2004. Web. <http://www.nationalgrandparentsday.com/NationalSongwritersAward.html>. ^ https://www.communities.qld.gov.au/communityservices/seniors/grandparents-day ^ "Debates (No. 247)". Debates of the House of Commons: 35th Parliament, 1st Session. House of Commons of Canada. October 25, 1995. Retrieved May 11, 2008.  ^ https://m.riigikogu.ee/en/sitting-reviews/riigikogu-passed-act-providing-grandparents-day/ ^ KJS lance la 13e Fête des grand'mères », Stratégies, 17 février 1999 ^ ""Istituzione della Festa nazionale dei nonni", Legge 31 luglio 2005, n. 159" (in Italian).  ^ "Dzień Dziadka". Retrieved 2014-01-21.  ^ (in Chinese) 教育部 99年第一屆「祖父母節」記者會活動 ^ Grandparents Day has moved to Sunday October 5, 2008 - Age Concern 2008-02-26

External links[edit]

National Grandparents Day
National Grandparents Day
Council official page (U.S.) U.S. Code 36 U.S.C. § 125, the law establishing the U.S. National Grandparents Day

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