HOME
The Info List - National Association Of Intercollegiate Athletics


--- Advertisement ---



The National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
(NAIA) is an athletic association that organizes college and university-level athletic programs, primarily across the United States but also outside the US. The NAIA began accepting members from Canada in 1972, which made it the only international intercollegiate athletic association in North America until 2009. Today there are three Canadian members. As of July 1, 2016, the NAIA reports having 246 member institutions.[3] The NAIA, whose headquarters is in Kansas City, Missouri,[4] sponsors 25 national championships. The CBS Sports Network, formerly called CSTV, serves as the national media outlet for the NAIA.[5] In 2014, ESPNU
ESPNU
began carrying the NAIA National Football Championship.

Contents

1 History

1.1 African-American participation 1.2 Female participation 1.3 Champions of Character 1.4 Other firsts

2 Championship sports

2.1 Basketball championships 2.2 Other championship sports 2.3 Discontinued championships 2.4 Invitational sports 2.5 Emerging sports

3 Conferences

3.1 Multi-sport conferences 3.2 Football-only conferences

4 Awards and honors 5 See also 6 References 7 External links

History[edit]

NAIA headquarters near the Power and Light District
Power and Light District
and Sprint Center in Downtown Kansas City.

In 1937, Dr. James Naismith
James Naismith
and local leaders staged the first National College
College
Basketball Tournament at Municipal Auditorium in Kansas City—one year before the first National Invitation Tournament and two years before the first NCAA Tournament. The goal of the tournament was to establish a forum for small colleges and universities to determine a national basketball champion. The original eight-team tournament expanded to 32 teams in 1938. On March 10, 1940, the National Association for Intercollegiate Basketball (NAIB) was formed in Kansas City, Missouri. In 1952, the NAIB was transformed into the NAIA, and with that came the sponsorship of additional sports such as men's golf, tennis and outdoor track and field.[6] Football in the NAIA was split into two divisions in 1970, based on enrollment (Div. I & Div. II); it was consolidated back into a single division in 1997. African-American participation[edit] In 1948, the NAIB became the first national organization to open their intercollegiate postseason to black student-athletes. That same year, Indiana State coach John Wooden, later to become a coaching legend at UCLA, brought the first African-American student athlete to play at the national tournament. The association furthered its commitment to African-American athletes when, in 1953, it became the first collegiate association to invite historically black colleges and universities into its membership. In 1957, Tennessee A&I (now Tennessee State) became the first historically black institution to win a collegiate basketball national championship. Female participation[edit] The NAIA began sponsoring intercollegiate championships for women in 1980, the second coed national athletics association to do so, offering collegiate athletics championships to women in basketball, cross country, gymnastics, indoor and outdoor track and field, softball, swimming and diving, tennis and volleyball. The National Junior College
College
Athletic Association had established a women's division in the spring of 1975 and held the first women's national championship volleyball tournament that fall. In 1997, Liz Heaston became the first female college athlete to play and score in a college football game when she kicked two extra points during the 1997 Linfield vs. Willamette football game.[7] Champions of Character[edit] Launched in 2000 by the NAIA, the Champions of Character program promotes character and sportsmanship through athletics. The Champions of Character conducts clinics and has developed an online training course to educate athletes, coaches, and athletic administrators with the skills necessary to promote character development in the context of sport. Other firsts[edit] Membership – The NAIA was the first association to admit colleges and universities from outside the United States. The NAIA began admitting Canadian members in 1999. Football – The NAIA was the first association to send a football team to Europe to play. In the summer of 1976, the NAIA sent Henderson State and Texas A&I to play 5 exhibition games in West Berlin, Vienna, Nuremberg, Mannheim and Paris.[8] Championship sports[edit] The NAIA sponsors 14 sports in which it conducts 25 annual championships (13 for men, 12 for women). The NAIA recognizes three levels of competitions: "emerging" (15 or more institutions sponsoring as varsity and declared), "invitational" (25 or more institutions sponsoring as varsity and declared for postseason, Approval of the National Administrative Council), and "championship" (40 or more institutions sponsoring as varsity, Minimum of two Invitationals held, Approval of the National Administrative Council).[9] The association conducts, or has conducted in the past, championship tournaments in the following sports (year established).[10] Basketball championships[edit]

Men's Basketball

Division I (1937) Division II (1992)

Women's Basketball

Division I (1981) Division II (1992)

The NAIA men's basketball championship is the longest-running collegiate National Championship of any sport in the United States. The tournament was the brainchild of Dr. James Naismith, creator of the game of basketball; Emil Liston, athletic director at Baker University; and Frank Cramer, founder of Cramer Athletic Products. The event began in 1937 with the inaugural tournament at Municipal Auditorium in Kansas City, MO. The 2017 men's championship marked the 80th edition of what has been tabbed College
College
Basketball’s Toughest Tournament. The tournament has awarded the Chuck Taylor Most Valuable Player award since 1939, as well as the Charles Stevenson Hustle Award ("Charlie Hustle"), which was the basis for Pete Rose's nickname, given to him by Whitey Ford. Basketball is currently the only NAIA sport in which the organization's member institutions are aligned into divisions. Other championship sports[edit]

Baseball (1957) Competitive Cheer and Dance (2016) Cross Country

Men's (1956) Women's (1980)

Football (1956) Golf

Men's (1952) Women's (1995)

Soccer

Men's (1959) Women's (1984)

Softball (1981) Swimming

Men's (1957) Women's (1981)

Tennis

Men's (1952) Women's (1981)

Indoor and Outdoor Track

Men's Indoor (1966) Men's Outdoor (1952) Women's Indoor (1981) Women's Outdoor (1981)

Volleyball

Women's Volleyball
Volleyball
(1980)[citation needed] Men's Volleyball
Volleyball
(original run 1969–1980[citation needed] / considered a "recognized" but nonetheless "unofficial" sport since 1999[11])

Wrestling (1956)

Discontinued championships[edit]

Bowling
Bowling
(1962–1978)[12] Gymnastics

Men's (1964–1985)[citation needed] Women's (1981–1988)

Ice Hockey (1968–1984) Water Polo[citation needed]

Invitational sports[edit]

Men's Lacrosse Women's Lacrosse Men's Volleyball[11]

Emerging sports[edit]

Men's Bowling[13] Women's Bowling[13]

Conferences[edit] The NAIA has 21 member conferences, including 9 that sponsor football, and the Association of Independent Institutions. Multi-sport conferences[edit] See also: Category:NAIA baseball by conference.

American Midwest Conference
American Midwest Conference
(AMC) Appalachian Athletic Conference
Appalachian Athletic Conference
(AAC) California Pacific Conference
California Pacific Conference
(CAL-PAC) Cascade Collegiate Conference
Cascade Collegiate Conference
(CCC) Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference
Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference
(CCAC) Crossroads League
Crossroads League
(CL) Frontier Conference Golden State Athletic Conference
Golden State Athletic Conference
(GSAC) Great Plains Athletic Conference
Great Plains Athletic Conference
(GPAC) Gulf Coast Athletic Conference
Gulf Coast Athletic Conference
(GCAC) Heart of America Athletic Conference
Heart of America Athletic Conference
(HAAC)

Association of Independent Institutions (AII) Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference
Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference
(KCAC) Mid-South Conference
Mid-South Conference
(MSC) North Star Athletic Association
North Star Athletic Association
(NSAA) Red River Athletic Conference (RRAC) River States Conference
River States Conference
(RSC) Sooner Athletic Conference
Sooner Athletic Conference
(SAC) Southern States Athletic Conference
Southern States Athletic Conference
(SSAC) Sun Conference
Sun Conference
(TSC) Wolverine–Hoosier Athletic Conference
Wolverine–Hoosier Athletic Conference
(WHAC)

Football-only conferences[edit]

Central States Football League
Central States Football League
(CSFL) Mid-States Football Association
Mid-States Football Association
(MSFA)

Awards and honors[edit] Al Ortolani Scholarship (ATA) The $500 undergraduate scholarship is awarded to an outstanding student trainer who is at least a junior and has maintained a GPA of 3.00. Athletic Trainer of the Year Presented to the NAIA-ATA member Athletic Trainer who has provided substantial service to student-athletes, the association or the member institution. Charles Morris Award The award was initiated in memory and honor of past Associate Executive Director Charles Morris. The award is presented annually to recognize Conference, Region and a National Administrator of the Year. The recipient should exemplify the loyalty and enthusiasm Charles Morris had for the NAIA. Nominees must be active as an administrator at a member institution or in conference/regional committee organizations. Clarence "Ike" Pearson (SIDA) Given annually to a member of the NAIA-Sports Information Directors Association to honor outstanding contributions to the profession. The award is named for the former statistical crew chief of the NAIA men's basketball national tournament in Kansas City, Missouri. Coach of Character Award The NAIA Coach of Character Award is an annual award given to a head coach of an NAIA institution. The nominee must be employed by the institution a minimum of 5 years and must be clearly outstanding in embracing the five core values of the NAIA Champions of Character initiative, methods of teaching character through sport, and community leadership through volunteering, service or other means. A.O. Duer Award Named in honor of the NAIA's former executive secretary for his 26 years of service to the Association. The A.O. Duer Award emphasizes our policy of scholarship in athletic programs. The award is presented annually to a junior men's and women's student-athlete in any sport who has excelled academically as well as athletically. To be eligible, a student-athlete must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.75 (on a 4.00 scale) and be in her/his junior year academically. Emil S. Liston Award The founder of the NAIB and the first executive secretary of the NAIA, Mr. Liston was a prime mover behind the men's basketball tournament. The award is annually presented to a junior men's and women's basketball player who has shown athletic and scholastic achievement. To be eligible, a student-athlete must have an overall grade point average of at least 3.50 (on a 4.00 scale) and be in her/his junior year academically. Each award consists of a $1,000 scholarship presented to the recipient’s institution to be used for tuition and approved expenses and an appropriate award is presented to the honoree. Hall Of Fame The NAIA Hall of Fame Award is the highest honor presented by the National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Nominees must be persons of outstanding quality, high moral character, fine leadership ability and must be held in high esteem by their colleagues, former coaches and former athletes. Larry Lady Officiating Award The NAIA Larry Lady Officiating Award is presented annually to an official of any sport recognized by the NAIA. It is named in honor of Larry Lady, current NAIA Supervisor of Officials for basketball, football and baseball. Nominees must be persons of outstanding quality, high moral character, fine officiating ability and be held in high esteem by their colleagues, administrators and athletes. The recipient will receive an award of $500 to be used by recipient, a member of the recipient’s family or family friend who attends an NAIA institution. NAIA-CTSA "All That's Right in Sport" Award The Citizenship through Sports Alliance (CTSA) and the NAIA have partnered to annually honor one NAIA institution, team or individual for actions that have clear connections to sportsmanship, and bring with them outstanding stories that motivate and inspire. All Buffalo Funds Five Star Champions of Character Team Award Winners, as well as institutional nominations, are eligible for this special recognition. The recipient (up to 2 team/institutional representatives) will be provided round-trip transportation to the awards ceremony held in conjunction with the annual CTSA Awards Banquet. Dr. Leroy Walker Character Award This award was created to honor Dr. LeRoy Walker a former president of the NAIA and President emeritus of the United States Olympic Committee. The nominee must be a representative of an NAIA institution as a student-athlete. The nominee must be at least a junior academic status at the nominating institution at the time of nomination, and must be “outstanding” in academic achievement (3.0 G.P.A or higher), campus leadership, community leadership, embracing the five core character values of the NAIA Champions of Character initiative, athletic achievement and future ambition. The recipient will receive a $1,000 cash award to the institution scholarship fund of recipient’s choice. The recipient also receives a specially engraved plaque/revere bowl as a permanent memento of the award. Wally Schwartz Award The Faculty Athletic Representative Association has initiated this award to honor past Vice-President of Legislative Services, Wally Schwartz. The Award will annually recognize Conference, Independent and a National FAR of the Year. The recipient should exemplify the loyalty, enthusiasm, and honesty that Wally Schwartz had, and still has, shown on behalf of the NAIA. Athletic Director of the Year Presented annually to the top athletic director who excels in the areas of budget development, facility development, promotion of student-athlete academic achievement, involvement in the Champions of Character initiative, athletic success, and service to the NAIA or community. Pattison Champions of Character Scholarships Sponsored by Dr. Phil and Mary Pattison, longtime NAIA supporters, awarded $2,000 scholarships to five NAIA student-athletes that participate in the NAIA DI Men's basketball tournament, and display the five core values of the Champions of Character program-respect, responsibility, integrity, servant leadership and sportsmanship. See also[edit]

List of NAIA conferences List of NAIA institutions List of NAIA regions List of college athletic programs by U.S. state NACDA Directors' Cup

References[edit]

^ "Site Map - NAIA - National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics". Naia.org. Retrieved 23 December 2017.  ^ " National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics
Education & Training > Extra Curricular Activities from". AllBusiness.com. Retrieved 2009-12-14.  ^ "NAIA Member Schools". Naia.org. Retrieved 23 December 2017.  ^ "Refreshing to..." Naia.cstv.com. Retrieved 23 December 2017.  ^ "Refreshing to..." Naia.cstv.com. Retrieved 23 December 2017.  ^ "NAIA History". Naiahoops.com. Archived from the original on 21 November 2011. Retrieved 23 December 2017.  ^ "Woman Kicks Extra Points". New York Times. October 20, 1997. Retrieved April 20, 2011.  ^ Deckelbaum, Kyle. "From Arkadelphia to Europe: the trip that transformed football". Katv.com. Retrieved 23 December 2017.  ^ "NAIA EMERGING SPORTS" (PDF). National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved December 22, 2014.  ^ "NAIA History". Archived from the original on June 21, 2006.  ^ a b "Refreshing to..." Naia.cstv.com. Retrieved 23 December 2017.  ^ Conrad, Ashley (February 4, 2012). "A New Kind of Game - Tabor College
College
creates opportunities for collegiate bowlers". National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Retrieved December 22, 2014.  ^ a b [1][dead link]

External links[edit]

Official website

v t e

National Association of Intercollegiate Athletics

NAIA

Conferences Institutions Regions

Sports and championships

Division I

Basketball

Men Women

Division II

Basketball

Men Women

Single division

Baseball

World Series

Competitive cheer & dance

Championship

Cross country

Men Women

Football

Championship

Golf

Men Women

Soccer

Men Women

Softball

Championship

Swimming & Diving

Men Women

Tennis

Men Women

Track & Field

Men's Indoor and Outdoor Women's Indoor and Outdoor

Volleyball

Women

Wrestling

Men

Invitation/ Emerging

Bowling

Men Women

Ice Hockey

Men

Lacrosse

Men Women

Volleyball

Men

Discontinued

Bowling Football

Division I Division II

Gymnastics

Women

Water Polo

v t e

NAIA conferences

Football conferences

Central States Football League Frontier Conference Great Plains Athletic Conference Heart of America Athletic Conference Kansas Collegiate Athletic Conference Mid-South Conference Mid-States Football Association North Star Athletic Association The Sun Conference NAIA independent football schools

Non-football conferences

American Midwest Conference Appalachian Athletic Conference California Pacific Conference Cascade Collegiate Conference Chicagoland Collegiate Athletic Conference Crossroads League Golden State Athletic Conference Gulf Coast Athletic Conference Red River Athletic Conference River States Conference Sooner Athletic Conference Southern States Athletic Conference Wolverine–Hoosier Athletic Conference NAIA independent schools

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 126797998 LCCN: n90652936 ISNI: 0

.