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1 French Land Register data, which excludes lakes, ponds, glaciers > 1 km2 (0.386 sq mi or 247 acres) and river estuaries. 2 Population without double counting: residents of multiple communes (e.g., students and military personnel) only counted once.

Montauban
Montauban
(French pronunciation: ​[mɔ̃tobɑ̃]; Occitan: Montalban) is a commune in the Tarn-et-Garonne
Tarn-et-Garonne
department in the Occitanie
Occitanie
region in southern France. It is the capital of the department and lies 50 kilometres (31 mi) north of Toulouse. Montauban
Montauban
is the most populated town in Tarn-et-Garonne, and the sixth most populated of Occitanie
Occitanie
behind Toulouse, Montpellier, Nîmes, Perpignan
Perpignan
and Béziers. In 2013, there were 57,921 inhabitants, called “Montalbanais”. The town has been classified “Ville d’art et d’histoire” (City of art and history) since 2015. The town, built mainly of a reddish brick, stands on the right bank of the Tarn at its confluence with the Tescou.

Contents

1 History 2 Climate 3 Sights 4 Economy 5 Demographics 6 Transport 7 Monument 8 Sport 9 Movies 10 Personalities 11 Institutions 12 Sister cities 13 See also 14 References 15 External links

History[edit]

Arcade at Place Nationale in Montauban

Montauban
Montauban
is the second oldest (after Mont-de-Marsan) of the bastides of southern France. Its foundation dates from 1144 when Count Alphonse Jourdain of Toulouse, granted it a liberal charter. The inhabitants were drawn chiefly from Montauriol, a village which had grown up around the neighbouring monastery of St Théodard. In the 13th century the town suffered much from the ravages of the Albigensian war
Albigensian war
and from the Inquisition, but by 1317 it had recovered sufficiently to be chosen by John XXII as the head of a diocese of which the basilica of St Théodard became the cathedral.

Redition of Montauban, 21 August 1629. Château de Richelieu.

In 1360, under the Treaty of Brétigny, it was ceded to the English; they were expelled by the inhabitants in 1414. In 1560 the bishops and magistrates embraced Protestantism, expelled the monks, and demolished the cathedral. Ten years later it became one of the four Huguenot strongholds under the Peace of Saint-Germain, and formed a small independent republic. It was the headquarters of the Huguenot rebellion of 1621, and successfully withstood an 86-day siege by Louis XIII. It did not submit to royal authority until after the fall of La Rochelle in 1629, when its fortifications were destroyed by Cardinal Richelieu. The Protestants again suffered persecution after the revocation of the Edict of Nantes
Edict of Nantes
in 1685. In the 17th century, the King of France
France
revoked “l’Édit de Nantes”. Montauban
Montauban
was considered as an intellectual city. Because Montauban
Montauban
was a Protestant town, it started to resist and hold its position against the royal power and it refused to give allegiance to the Catholic King. To scare off the King’s opponents and speed up the end of the siege, 400 cannonballs were fired, but Montauban resisted and the royal army was vanquished. Saint Jacques church is still marked by the cannonballs, and every year in September, the city celebrates “les 400 coups” (the 400 shots), which has become a common phrase in French. During World War II, Leonardo da Vinci's Mona Lisa
Mona Lisa
was briefly hidden in a secret vault behind a wine cellar at Montauban. Climate[edit]

Climate data for Montauban
Montauban
(1981–2010 averages, extremes 1885–present)

Month Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec Year

Record high °C (°F) 18.5 (65.3) 23.6 (74.5) 28.0 (82.4) 30.3 (86.5) 35.5 (95.9) 38.9 (102) 40.0 (104) 41.8 (107.2) 36.2 (97.2) 32.0 (89.6) 24.8 (76.6) 19.4 (66.9) 41.8 (107.2)

Average high °C (°F) 9.2 (48.6) 11.4 (52.5) 15.1 (59.2) 17.7 (63.9) 21.8 (71.2) 25.5 (77.9) 28.3 (82.9) 28.1 (82.6) 24.8 (76.6) 19.8 (67.6) 13.1 (55.6) 9.5 (49.1) 18.7 (65.7)

Daily mean °C (°F) 5.6 (42.1) 6.8 (44.2) 9.8 (49.6) 12.3 (54.1) 16.2 (61.2) 19.8 (67.6) 22.2 (72) 22.0 (71.6) 18.7 (65.7) 14.7 (58.5) 9.2 (48.6) 6.0 (42.8) 13.6 (56.5)

Average low °C (°F) 1.9 (35.4) 2.2 (36) 4.5 (40.1) 6.9 (44.4) 10.7 (51.3) 14.1 (57.4) 16.2 (61.2) 15.9 (60.6) 12.6 (54.7) 9.6 (49.3) 5.3 (41.5) 2.6 (36.7) 8.6 (47.5)

Record low °C (°F) −20.0 (−4) −18.0 (−0.4) −9.3 (15.3) −3.0 (26.6) −1.0 (30.2) 2.0 (35.6) 6.0 (42.8) 3.0 (37.4) 1.0 (33.8) −3.2 (26.2) −9.4 (15.1) −11.0 (12.2) −20.0 (−4)

Average precipitation mm (inches) 56.5 (2.224) 54.9 (2.161) 50.0 (1.969) 75.1 (2.957) 72.7 (2.862) 64.8 (2.551) 45.1 (1.776) 50.5 (1.988) 60.7 (2.39) 61.2 (2.409) 58.7 (2.311) 61.7 (2.429) 711.9 (28.028)

Average precipitation days (≥ 1.0 mm) 10.2 8.4 8.7 10.2 9.8 7.3 5.7 6.8 6.7 8.7 9.6 10.0 102.0

Mean monthly sunshine hours 87.4 117.5 177.2 187.0 217.5 239.4 263.6 251.4 209.2 149.8 88.7 77.5 2,066.1

Source: Météo France[1][2][3]

Montauban’s climate is temperate and oceanic. Temperatures are rather mild in winter and hot in summer. The town experienced severe droughts in 2003, 2006, 2012 and 2015. On August 31, 2015, the Tarn-et-Garonne
Tarn-et-Garonne
area was particularly struck by a wave of violent storms. These storms, accompanied by very strong winds, created a tornado, which caused considerable damage in a large part of the department. Montauban
Montauban
was particularly affected, with winds measured between 130 and 150 kilometers per hour (a record) in the city center. Sights[edit] Its fortifications have been replaced by boulevards beyond which extend numerous suburbs, while on the left bank of the Tarn is the suburb of Villebourbon, which is connected to the town by a remarkable bridge of the early 14th century. This bridge is known as Pont Vieux (i.e. "Old Bridge"). King Philip the Fair of France
France
officially launched the building of the bridge in 1303 while on a tour to Toulouse. The project took 30 years to complete, and the bridge was inaugurated in 1335. The main architects were Étienne de Ferrières and Mathieu de Verdun. It is a pink brick structure over 205 metres (224 yards) in length, but while its fortified towers have disappeared, it is otherwise in a good state of preservation. The bridge was designed to resist the violent floods of the Tarn, and indeed it successfully withstood the two terrible millennial floods of 1441 and 1930. The bridge is a straight level bridge, which is quite unusual for Medieval Europe, where lack of technological skills meant that most bridges were of the humpback type.

The Great Warrior of Montauban

The Musée Ingres, on the site of a castle of the Counts of Toulouse and once the residence of the bishops of Montauban, stands at the east end of the bridge. It belongs chiefly to the 17th century, but some portions are much older, notably an underground chamber known as the Hall of the Black Prince
Black Prince
(Salle du Prince Noir). It comprises most of the work (including his "Jesus among the Teachers of the Law") of Jean Ingres, the celebrated painter, whose birth in Montauban
Montauban
is commemorated by an elaborate monument. It is the largest museum of Ingres paintings in the world. The museum also contains some sculptures by famous sculptor Antoine Bourdelle, another native of Montauban, as well as collections of antiquities (Greek vases) and 18th and 19th ceramics. The Place Nationale is a square of the 17th century, entered at each corner by gateways giving access to a large open space surrounded by pink brick houses supported by double rows of arcades. The préfecture is located in the palace built by the intendant of Montauban
Montauban
(the equivalent of a préfet before the French Revolution), and is a large elegant 18th century mansion, built of pink bricks and white stone, with a steep roof of blue gray slates, in a style combining northern and southern French styles of architecture. The chief churches of Montauban
Montauban
are the cathedral, remarkable only for the possession of the "Vow of Louis XIII", one of the masterpieces of Ingres, and the church of St Jacques (14th and 15th centuries), dedicated to Saint James of Compostela, the façade of which is surmounted by a handsome octagonal tower, the base of which is in Romanesque style, while the upper levels, built later, are in Gothic style. [Montauban:[1] Economy[edit] The commercial importance of Montauban
Montauban
is due rather to its trade in agricultural produce, horses, game and poultry, than to its industries, which include nursery-gardening, cloth-weaving, cloth-dressing, flour-milling, wood-sawing, and the manufacture of furniture, silk-gauze and straw hats. However, due to the proximity of Toulouse
Toulouse
and the cheaper cost of industrial grounds, more and more mechanical products are being manufactured there. Demographics[edit] Population:

1906: town, 16,813; commune, 28,688 1962: 41,002 1968: 45,872 1975: 48,028 1982: 50,682 1990: 51,224 1999: 51,855 2006: 55,927 2009: 45,000

Aire urbaine:

2008: 60,075

Transport[edit] The town is a railway junction, and the station Gare de Montauban-Ville-Bourbon offers connections with Toulouse, Bordeaux, Paris, Brive-la-Gaillarde, Marseille
Marseille
and several regional destinations. Montauban
Montauban
communicates with the Garonne
Garonne
via the Canal de Montech. Monument[edit]

Town hall

Ingres Museum

Cathedral

Founded in 1144 by the Comte de Toulouse, the town of Montauban
Montauban
has some particularities: its center’s red brick streets intersect at right angles and meet at the National Square (Place Nationale) which is ranked among the most beautiful squares of France. Some buildings and architectural complexes are distinguished, such as “le Musée Ingres”, “la Place Nationale”, “le Pont vieux”, “L’église Saint Jacques”, “ la Cathédrale Notre Dame”, «  l’Ancien Collège des Jésuites », « le Muséum ». Sport[edit] The town is home of the rugby union club US Montauban. The team gained promotion from the Pro D2 competition for the 2006–07 Top 14
Top 14
season. The whole town supports rugby, but the athletic club is also very efficient and national results have been regular since 2007. Some athletes in Montauban’s athletic club are international athletes. Every year, since 2004, the Rene Arcuset cross country race has been organized in the city. Movies[edit] In the movie “Les Tontons Flingueurs” a French classic by Georges Lautner, shot and released in 1963, Lino Ventura's character is a businessman from Montauban. Called to Paris
Paris
for a personal case, he is nicknamed by Bernard Blier’s character “Le gugusse de Montauban” (the guy from Montauban.) The “gugusse” will later answer: “one should never leave Montauban”. Recently, a round-about in the center of the town was renamed “Tonton Flingueurs’ round-about” and placards with drawings of the actors have been displayed. Personalities[edit] Montauban
Montauban
was the birthplace of:

Jean-Baptiste Massip (1676–1751), 18th-century French playwright, poet, libretist Marquis Jean-Jacques Lefranc of Pompignan (1709–1784), poet Jacques Antoine Hippolyte, Comte de Guibert (1743–1790), general and military writer Olympe de Gouges
Olympe de Gouges
(1748–1793), playwright and journalist whose feminist writings reached a large audience Jean Bon Saint-André
Jean Bon Saint-André
(1749–1813), French revolutionary Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, (1780–1867), painter Adrien Joseph Prax-Paris
Adrien Joseph Prax-Paris
(1829–1909), Bonapartist deputy for Tarn-et-Garonne
Tarn-et-Garonne
during the Second French Empire and the French Third Republic. Joseph Lachaud de Loqueyssie (1848–1896), deputy of Tarn-et-Garonne in 1877–81. Antoine Bourdelle
Antoine Bourdelle
(1861–1929), sculptor and teacher Léon Bourjade
Léon Bourjade
(1889–1924), French fighter pilot during World War One and Catholic missionary Daniel Cohn-Bendit
Daniel Cohn-Bendit
(1943–), leader of May '68
May '68
student protests and MEP Vincent de Swarte (1963–2006), writer Didier Rous
Didier Rous
(1970–), cyclist Mathieu Perget
Mathieu Perget
(1984–), cyclist Camille Gardelle (1866–1947), architect who designed many famous buildings in Uruguay Alexis Palisson
Alexis Palisson
(1987–), rugby union player

Montauban
Montauban
was the deathplace of:

Manuel Azaña
Manuel Azaña
(1880–1940), the last President of the Second Spanish Republic (1931–1939), died in exile

Institutions[edit] Montauban
Montauban
is the seat of a bishop and a court of assize. It has tribunals of first instance and of commerce, a chamber of commerce and a board of trade arbitration, lycées and a training college, schools of commerce and viticulture, a branch of the Bank of France, and a faculty of Protestant theology. Sister cities[edit]

Pawhuska, Oklahoma, USA Gourbeyre, France Yokneam, Israel Khemisset, Morocco Kozarac, Bosnia and Herzegovina Prokuplje, Serbia

See also[edit]

Communes of the Tarn-et-Garonne
Tarn-et-Garonne
department

References[edit]

^ "Données climatiques de la station de Montauban" (in French). Meteo France. Retrieved January 8, 2016.  ^ "Climat Midi-Pyrénées" (in French). Meteo France. Retrieved January 8, 2016.  ^ " Montauban
Montauban
(82)" (PDF). Fiche Climatologique: Statistiques 1981–2010 et records (in French). Meteo France. Archived from the original (PDF) on 30 March 2018. Retrieved 30 March 2018. 

INSEE Philip Conner, Huguenot
Huguenot
Heartland: Montauban
Montauban
and Southern French Calvinism during the Wars of Religion (Aldershot, 2002) (St Andrews Studies in Reformation History).

Attribution

 This article incorporates text from a publication now in the public domain: Chisholm, Hugh, ed. (1911). "Montauban". Encyclopædia Britannica (11th ed.). Cambridge University Press. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Montauban.

Official website

v t e

Prefectures of departments of France

Bourg-en-Bresse
Bourg-en-Bresse
(Ain) Laon
Laon
(Aisne) Moulins (Allier) Digne-les-Bains
Digne-les-Bains
(Alpes-de-Haute-Provence) Gap (Hautes-Alpes) Nice
Nice
(Alpes-Maritimes) Privas
Privas
(Ardèche) Charleville-Mézières
Charleville-Mézières
(Ardennes) Foix
Foix
(Ariège) Troyes
Troyes
(Aube) Carcassonne
Carcassonne
(Aude) Rodez
Rodez
(Aveyron) Marseille
Marseille
(Bouches-du-Rhône) Caen
Caen
(Calvados) Aurillac
Aurillac
(Cantal) Angoulême
Angoulême
(Charente) La Rochelle
La Rochelle
(Charente-Maritime) Bourges
Bourges
(Cher) Tulle
Tulle
(Corrèze) Ajaccio
Ajaccio
(Corse-du-Sud) Bastia
Bastia
(Haute-Corse) Dijon
Dijon
(Côte-d'Or) Saint-Brieuc
Saint-Brieuc
(Côtes-d'Armor) Guéret
Guéret
(Creuse) Périgueux
Périgueux
(Dordogne) Besançon
Besançon
(Doubs) Valence (Drôme) Évreux
Évreux
(Eure) Chartres
Chartres
(Eure-et-Loir) Quimper
Quimper
(Finistère) Nîmes
Nîmes
(Gard) Toulouse
Toulouse
(Haute-Garonne) Auch
Auch
(Gers) Bordeaux
Bordeaux
(Gironde) Montpellier
Montpellier
(Hérault) Rennes
Rennes
(Ille-et-Vilaine) Châteauroux
Châteauroux
(Indre) Tours
Tours
(Indre-et-Loire) Grenoble
Grenoble
(Isère) Lons-le-Saunier
Lons-le-Saunier
(Jura) Mont-de-Marsan
Mont-de-Marsan
(Landes) Blois
Blois
(Loir-et-Cher) Saint-Étienne
Saint-Étienne
(Loire) Le Puy-en-Velay
Le Puy-en-Velay
(Haute-Loire) Nantes
Nantes
(Loire-Atlantique) Orléans
Orléans
(Loiret) Cahors
Cahors
(Lot) Agen
Agen
(Lot-et-Garonne) Mende (Lozère) Angers
Angers
(Maine-et-Loire) Saint-Lô
Saint-Lô
(Manche) Châlons-en-Champagne
Châlons-en-Champagne
(Marne) Chaumont (Haute-Marne) Laval (Mayenne) Nancy (Meurthe-et-Moselle) Bar-le-Duc
Bar-le-Duc
(Meuse) Vannes
Vannes
(Morbihan) Metz
Metz
(Moselle) Nevers
Nevers
(Nièvre) Lille
Lille
(Nord) Beauvais
Beauvais
(Oise) Alençon
Alençon
(Orne) Arras
Arras
(Pas-de-Calais) Clermont-Ferrand
Clermont-Ferrand
(Puy-de-Dôme) Pau (Pyrénées-Atlantiques) Tarbes
Tarbes
(Hautes-Pyrénées) Perpignan
Perpignan
(Pyrénées-Orientales) Strasbourg
Strasbourg
(Bas-Rhin) Colmar
Colmar
(Haut-Rhin) Lyon
Lyon
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Vesoul
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Mâcon
(Saône-et-Loire) Le Mans
Le Mans
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Chambéry
(Savoie) Annecy
Annecy
(Haute-Savoie) Paris
Paris
(Paris) Rouen
Rouen
(Seine-Maritime) Melun
Melun
(Seine-et-Marne) Versailles (Yvelines) Niort
Niort
(Deux-Sèvres) Amiens
Amiens
(Somme) Albi
Albi
(Tarn) Montauban
Montauban
(Tarn-et-Garonne) Toulon
Toulon
(Var) Avignon
Avignon
(Vaucluse) La Roche-sur-Yon
La Roche-sur-Yon
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Limoges
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Épinal
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Auxerre
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Nanterre
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Bobigny
(Seine-Saint-Denis) Créteil
Créteil
(Val-de-Marne) Cergy, Pontoise
Pontoise
(Val-d'Oise)

Overseas departments

Basse-Terre
Basse-Terre
(Guadeloupe) Fort-de- France
France
(Martinique) Cayenne
Cayenne
(French Guiana) Saint-Denis (Réunion) Mamoudzou
Mamoudzou
(Mayotte)

v t e

Communes of the Tarn-et-Garonne
Tarn-et-Garonne
department

Albefeuille-Lagarde Albias Angeville Asques Aucamville Auterive Auty Auvillar Balignac Bardigues Barry-d'Islemade Les Barthes Beaumont-de-Lomagne Beaupuy Belbèze-en-Lomagne Belvèze Bessens Bioule Boudou Bouillac Bouloc-en-Quercy Bourg-de-Visa Bourret Brassac Bressols Bruniquel Campsas Canals Castanet Castelferrus Castelmayran Castelsagrat Castelsarrasin Castéra-Bouzet Caumont Le Causé Caussade Caylus Cayrac Cayriech Cazals Cazes-Mondenard Comberouger Corbarieu Cordes-Tolosannes Coutures Cumont Dieupentale Donzac Dunes Durfort-Lacapelette Escatalens Escazeaux Espalais Esparsac Espinas Fabas Fajolles Faudoas Fauroux Féneyrols Finhan Garganvillar Gariès Gasques Génébrières Gensac Gimat Ginals Glatens Goas Golfech Goudourville Gramont Grisolles L'Honor-de-Cos Labarthe Labastide-de-Penne Labastide-du-Temple Labastide-Saint-Pierre Labourgade Lacapelle-Livron Lachapelle Lacour Lacourt-Saint-Pierre Lafitte Lafrançaise Laguépie Lamagistère Lamothe-Capdeville Lamothe-Cumont Lapenche Larrazet Lauzerte Lavaurette Lavit Léojac Lizac Loze Malause Mansonville Marignac Marsac Mas-Grenier Maubec Maumusson Meauzac Merles Mirabel Miramont-de-Quercy Moissac Molières Monbéqui Monclar-de-Quercy Montagudet Montaigu-de-Quercy Montaïn Montalzat Montastruc Montauban Montbarla Montbartier Montbeton Montech Monteils Montesquieu Montfermier Montgaillard Montjoi Montpezat-de-Quercy Montricoux Mouillac Nègrepelisse Nohic Orgueil Parisot Perville Le Pin Piquecos Pommevic Pompignan Poupas Puycornet Puygaillard-de-Lomagne Puygaillard-de-Quercy Puylagarde Puylaroque Réalville Reyniès Roquecor Saint-Aignan Saint-Amans-de-Pellagal Saint-Amans-du-Pech Saint-Antonin-Noble-Val Saint-Arroumex Saint-Beauzeil Saint-Cirice Saint-Cirq Saint-Clair Sainte-Juliette Saint-Étienne-de-Tulmont Saint-Georges Saint-Jean-du-Bouzet Saint-Loup Saint-Michel Saint-Nauphary Saint-Nazaire-de-Valentane Saint-Nicolas-de-la-Grave Saint-Paul-d'Espis Saint-Porquier Saint-Projet Saint-Sardos Saint-Vincent-d'Autéjac Saint-Vincent-Lespinasse La Salvetat-Belmontet Sauveterre Savenès Septfonds Sérignac Sistels Touffailles Tréjouls Vaïssac Valeilles Valence Varen Varennes Vazerac Verdun-sur-Garonne Verfeil Verlhac-Tescou Vigueron Villebrumier La Ville-Dieu-du-Temple Villemade

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 126552114 LCCN: n50005126 ISNI: 0000 0001 2248 1958 GND: 4102157-5 SUDOC: 034264639 BNF: cb1527


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