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The Info List - Mo Vaughn





Maurice Samuel "Mo" Vaughn (born December 15, 1967), nicknamed "The Hit Dog", is a former Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
first baseman. He played from 1991 to 2003. Vaughn was a three-time All-Star selection and won the American League
American League
MVP award in 1995 with the Boston
Boston
Red Sox.

Contents

1 Early life and education 2 Professional career

2.1 Boston
Boston
Red Sox

2.1.1 Last season with the Sox

2.2 Anaheim Angels 2.3 New York Mets

3 Post-playing career 4 Hall of Fame candidacy 5 Performance-enhancing drugs 6 See also 7 References 8 External links

Early life and education[edit] Vaughn attended New Canaan Country School in New Canaan, Connecticut.[1] He played baseball for Trinity-Pawling School
Trinity-Pawling School
in Pawling, New York.[2][3] He then moved on to play baseball at Seton Hall for head coach Mike Sheppard. While there he set the school record for home runs with 28. In his three years at Seton Hall he hit a total of 57 home runs and 218 RBIs, both team records.[4] His teammates included seven-time All-Star and Hall of Famer Craig Biggio and Red Sox teammate John Valentin. Vaughn earned the Jack Kaiser Award as MVP of the 1987 Big East Conference Baseball Tournament while keying the Pirates' championship run.[5] Professional career[edit] Boston
Boston
Red Sox[edit] Vaughn became the centerpiece of the Red Sox's line-up in 1993, hitting 29 home runs and contributing 101 RBIs. In 1995, he established a reputation as one of the most feared hitters in the American League
American League
when he hit 39 home runs with 126 RBIs and a .300 average. He also garnered 11 stolen bases. His efforts, which led the Red Sox to the playoffs (only to lose to the Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
in the American League
American League
Division Series), were rewarded with the American League MVP award. Vaughn had his career year with the Red Sox in 1996, batting an average of .326, playing in 161 games, with 44 home runs, and 143 RBIs. In a May 30, 1997 game against the Yankees, Vaughn went 4-for-4 with three solo homers in the Red Sox's 10-4 win. Vaughn continued to improve over the next several seasons, batting .315 or higher from 1996 to 1998 and averaging 40 home runs and 118 RBIs. The Red Sox lost in the American League
American League
Division Series in 1998, once again to the Cleveland Indians, although Vaughn played well, hitting two home runs and driving in seven runs in game one. He was noted for "crowding the plate"; his stance was such that his front elbow often appeared to be hovering in the strike zone, which intimidated pitchers into throwing outside pitches. Last season with the Sox[edit] Though Vaughn's powerful personality and extensive charity work made him a popular figure in Boston, he had many issues with the Red Sox management and local media; his disagreements with Boston Globe
Boston Globe
sports columnist Will McDonough and Red Sox general manager Dan Duquette
Dan Duquette
were particularly acute. As an outspoken clubhouse leader, Vaughn repeatedly stated that the conservative Sox administration did not want him around. Incidents in which he allegedly punched a man in the mouth outside of a nightclub and crashed his truck while returning home from a strip club in Providence led to further rifts with the administration. Vaughn hit a walk-off grand slam in the ninth inning of Opening Day
Opening Day
at Fenway Park
Fenway Park
against the Seattle Mariners
Seattle Mariners
in 1998. Vaughn was one half of a formidable middle of the lineup with shortstop Nomar Garciaparra. The two combined for 75 home runs in 1998, Vaughn's final year with the club. After the Cleveland Indians
Cleveland Indians
knocked Boston
Boston
out of the playoffs in the first round, Vaughn became a free agent. Almost immediately, he signed a six-year, $80-million deal with the Anaheim Angels,[6] the highest contract in the game at that time. Anaheim Angels[edit] While he hit well for Anaheim when he played—he hit 30-plus home runs and knocked in over 100 runs in both 1999 and 2000—Vaughn was plagued by injuries in 1999 and didn't play a single game in the 2001 season. He started his Anaheim career by falling down the visitor's dugout steps on his first play of his first game, badly spraining his ankle. Vaughn was nevertheless seen as a viable middle of the line-up producer before the 2002 season and was traded to the New York Mets
New York Mets
on December 27, 2001 for Kevin Appier. Following Vaughn's departure from Anaheim, Angels closer Troy Percival took a shot at him, saying "We may miss Mo's bat, but we won't miss his leadership. Darin Erstad
Darin Erstad
is our leader." This prompted the normally mild-mannered Vaughn to go off on a profanity-laced tirade, saying that Percival and the Angels "ain't done (expletive) in this game." He remarked "They ain't got no flags hanging at friggin' Edison Field, so the hell with them." Ironically, the Angels would go on to win the World Series that year and hang a World Series flag at Edison Field.[7] New York Mets[edit] With the Mets, Vaughn was counted upon to be a key catalyst in a revamped lineup that featured imports Roger Cedeño, Jeromy Burnitz, and Roberto Alomar. Vaughn got off to a slow start in 2002, was ridiculed in local sports columns and on sports talk radio shows, and was clearly not in the same shape he was during his signature seasons in Boston—he weighed 268 pounds during his first season in New York. A late surge after the all star break that saw him hit one of the most memorable home runs in Shea Stadium
Shea Stadium
history (in the middle of the "Bud" Sign on the monstrous Shea scoreboard) on July 28 was one of the few highlights in a mostly disastrous season for Vaughn. However, in 2002, he hit his 300th career home run on April 3, against Pittsburgh Pirates starting pitcher Kip Wells, and a game winning three-run home run in the 8th inning of a game on June 16 that gave the Mets a 3–2 win over the Yankees. Looking for a comeback in 2003, he played less than a month in 2003 before a knee injury ended the season for him.[8] Post-playing career[edit] Vaughn is a Managing Director of OMNI New York LLC along with Eugene Schneur which has bought and rehabilitated 1,142 units of distressed housing in the New York metropolitan area. The company also manages these properties to provide low cost housing using government tax credits. He recently purchased the Noble Drew Ali Plaza in Brownsville, Brooklyn
Brownsville, Brooklyn
for $21 million, and plans to add massive security upgrades and renovate it.[9] He has also been involved in refurbishing the Whitney Young
Whitney Young
Manor in Yonkers, New York, a development first constructed by a company owned by his hero Jackie Robinson. Besides the New York metropolitan area, his company is also involved in projects in Cheyenne, Miami and Las Vegas and has expressed an interest in Boston.[10] In January 2009 it had been reported by WCVB-TV
WCVB-TV
in Boston
Boston
that Vaughn had recently committed to investing "$6 million in improvements to the 168-unit Sycamore Village complex that will include new appliances and exterior renovations. Vaughn said his company does not tolerate guns, drugs and criminal behavior. Planning Director Michael Sweeney said Omni's purchase is a 'major reinvestment' in the city" of Lawrence, Massachusetts. Vaughn is the president of a trucking company ( Mo Vaughn Transport) in Solon, Ohio.[11] His cousin Greg Vaughn has a son named Cory Vaughn who is in the minor leagues playing for the Arizona Diamondbacks organization currently.[12] However, Cory was initially drafted by the New York Mets organization in the 4th round of the 2010 June amateur draft out of San Diego State University where he played under Tony Gwynn.[13] On April 18, 2013, Vaughn bought an advertisement section of The Boston Globe
Boston Globe
and used it to salute those involved in helping the victims of the April 15, 2013 Patriots Day Bombing in Boston. "You are all heroes in my eyes", wrote Vaughn, " Boston
Boston
will march on." Hall of Fame candidacy[edit] Vaughn became eligible for the National Baseball Hall of Fame
National Baseball Hall of Fame
in 2009. 75% of the vote was necessary for induction, and 5% was necessary to stay on the ballot. He received 1.1% of the vote and dropped off the ballot. Performance-enhancing drugs[edit] It was revealed on December 13, 2007 in the report by Senator George J. Mitchell that Vaughn had purchased steroids or other performance-enhancing drugs from Kirk Radomski, who said he delivered the drugs to him personally. Radomski produced three checks, one for $2,200 and two more for $3,200, from Vaughn, one of the latter dated June 1, 2001, and another dated June 19, 2001. Radomski said that the higher checks were for two kits of HGH, while the lower one was for one and a half kits. Vaughn's name, address and telephone number were listed in an address book seized from Radomski's house by federal agents. Vaughn's trainer instructed him to take HGH in attempt to recover from injury. Mitchell requested a meeting with Vaughn in order to provide Vaughn with the information about these allegations and to give him an opportunity to respond, but Vaughn never agreed to set a meeting.[14] See also[edit]

List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career home run leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
career runs batted in leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
annual runs batted in leaders List of Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
players named in the Mitchell Report

References[edit]

^ https://www.nytimes.com/1999/03/22/sports/baseball-vaughn-brings-bat-and-leadership.html ^ "Mo Vaughn". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved April 23, 2013.  ^ "Dedication of Mo Vaughn '86 Baseball Field". Trinity-Pawling school via YouTube. September 29, 2012.  ^ 1991 Score card # 750.  ^ 2012 Big East Baseball Media Guide. Big East Conference. p. 66. Retrieved January 21, 2013.  ^ "Risk of further injury is too high". ESPN.com. January 25, 2004. Retrieved 2008-11-08.  ^ Vaughn Blasts Percival, Team – The Los Angeles Times ^ BASEBALL; Vaughn Is Out for the Year And Is Unlikely to Return – The New York Times ^ RICH CALDER (2007-01-10). "MO'S THE MAN OF THE HOUSE". New York Post. Archived from the original on 2007-04-02. Retrieved 2007-06-17.  ^ Stan Grossfeld (2007-06-17). "Vaughn is in rebuilding mode". Boston Globe. Retrieved 2007-06-17.  ^ McIntyre, Michael K. (2011-08-28). "'Divine intervention' lands a baseball buyer for Ken Lanci's posh pad: Michael K. McIntyre's Tipoff". The Plain Dealer. Cleveland, Ohio. Retrieved 2011-09-01.  ^ "Cory Vaughn". Baseball Reference. Retrieved 12 May 2016.  ^ TIM ROHAN (February 20, 2014). "Like Father Like Son? The Mets Can Only Hope". NY Times. Retrieved 12 May 2016.  ^ Mitchell, George (December 13, 2007). "Report to the Commissioner of Baseball of an Independent Investigation into the Illegal Use of Steroids
Steroids
and Other Performance Enhancing Substances by Players in Major League Baseball" (PDF). MLB.com. Retrieved 25 June 2012. 

External links[edit]

Career statistics and player information from ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube USA Today article

Preceded by Frank Thomas American League
American League
Player of the Month May 1996 Succeeded by Mark McGwire

v t e

Big East Conference
Big East Conference
Baseball Player of the Year

1985: Ford 1986: Haggerty 1987: Robinson 1988: Vaughn 1989: Scott 1990: McCaffery 1991: Neill 1992: Tinnerello 1993: Merloni & Stanczak 1994: Tyler 1995: O'Toole 1996: Grabowski 1997: Kim 1998: Ust 1999: Reed 2000: Fenster 2001: Scott & Stanley 2002: Stanley 2003: Rine & Tugwell 2004: Hiser 2005: McGuire 2006: Cooper 2007: Frazier 2008: Dominguez & Harrison 2009: Dominguez 2010: Leonard 2011: Springer 2012: Kivlehan 2013: Jagielo 2014: Fowler & Ruhlman 2015: Collins 2016: Jernigan 2017: Bannon

v t e

1989 Major League Baseball
Major League Baseball
Draft First Round Selections

Ben McDonald Tyler Houston Roger Salkeld Jeff Jackson Donald Harris Paul Coleman Frank Thomas Earl Cunningham Kyle Abbott Charles Johnson Calvin Murray Jeff Juden Brent Mayne Steve Hosey Kiki Jones Greg Blosser Cal Eldred Willie Greene Eddie Zosky Scott Bryant Greg Gohr Tom Goodwin Mo Vaughn Alan Zinter Chuck Knoblauch Scott Burrell Todd Jones Jamie McAndrew Kevin Morton Gordon Powell

v t e

Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
first-round draft picks

1965: Conigliaro 1966: Brett 1967: Garman 1968: Maggard 1969: Jenks 1970: Hacker 1971: Rice 1972: Bishop 1973: Cox 1974: Ford 1975: Foster 1976: Hurst 1977: Madden 1978: None 1979: None 1980: None 1981: Lyons, Burrell 1982: Horn, Parkins, Ledbetter 1983: Clemens 1984: Marzano 1985: Gabriele 1986: McMurtry 1987: Harris, Zupcic 1988: Fischer 1989: Blosser, Vaughn, Morton 1990: None 1991: Sele, J. Johnson, Hatteberg 1992: None 1993: Nixon 1994: Garciaparra 1995: Yount, Jenkins 1996: Garrett, Reitsma 1997: Curtice, Fischer 1998: Everett 1999: Asadoorian, Baker, Fossum 2000: Dumatrait 2001: None 2002: None 2003: Murphy, Murton 2004: None 2005: Ellsbury, Hansen, Buchholz, Lowrie, Bowden 2006: Place, Bard, K. Johnson, Clay 2007: Hagadone, Dent 2008: Kelly, Price 2009: Fuentes 2010: Vitek, Brentz, Ranaudo 2011: Barnes, Swihart, Owens, Bradley 2012: Marrero, B. Johnson, Light 2013: Ball 2014: Chavis, Kopech 2015: Benintendi 2016: Groome 2017: Houck

v t e

American League
American League
MVP Award

1931: Grove 1932: Foxx 1933: Foxx 1934: Cochrane 1935: Greenberg 1936: Gehrig 1937: Gehringer 1938: Foxx 1939: DiMaggio 1940: Greenberg 1941: DiMaggio 1942: Gordon 1943: Chandler 1944: Newhouser 1945: Newhouser 1946: Williams 1947: DiMaggio 1948: Boudreau 1949: Williams 1950: Rizzuto 1951: Berra 1952: Shantz 1953: Rosen 1954: Berra 1955: Berra 1956: Mantle 1957: Mantle 1958: Jensen 1959: Fox 1960: Maris 1961: Maris 1962: Mantle 1963: Howard 1964: B. Robinson 1965: Versalles 1966: F. Robinson 1967: Yastrzemski 1968: McLain 1969: Killebrew 1970: Powell 1971: Blue 1972: Allen 1973: Jackson 1974: Burroughs 1975: Lynn 1976: Munson 1977: Carew 1978: Rice 1979: Baylor 1980: Brett 1981: Fingers 1982: Yount 1983: Ripken Jr. 1984: Hernández 1985: Mattingly 1986: Clemens 1987: Bell 1988: Canseco 1989: Yount 1990: Henderson 1991: Ripken Jr. 1992: Eckersley 1993: Thomas 1994: Thomas 1995: Vaughn 1996: González 1997: Griffey Jr. 1998: González 1999: I. Rodríguez 2000: Giambi 2001: Suzuki 2002: Tejada 2003: A. Rodriguez 2004: Guerrero 2005: A. Rodriguez 2006: Morneau 2007: A. Rodriguez 2008: Pedroia 2009: Mauer 2010: Hamilton 2011: Verlander 2012: Cabrera 2013: Cabrera 2014: Trout 2015: Donaldson 2016: Trout 2017: Altuve

v t e

American League
American League
season runs batted in leaders

1901: Lajoie 1902: Freeman 1903: Freeman 1904: Lajoie 1905: H. Davis 1906: H. Davis 1907: Cobb 1908: Cobb 1909: Cobb 1910: Crawford 1911: Cobb 1912: Baker 1913: Baker 1914: Crawford 1915: Veach & Crawford 1916: Pratt 1917: Veach 1918: Veach 1919: Ruth 1920: Ruth 1921: Ruth 1922: K. Williams 1923: Ruth 1924: Goslin 1925: Meusel 1926: Ruth 1927: Gehrig 1928: Ruth & Gehrig 1929: Simmons 1930: Gehrig 1931: Gehrig 1932: Foxx 1933: Foxx 1934: Gehrig 1935: Greenberg 1936: Trosky 1937: Greenberg 1938: Foxx 1939: T. Williams 1940: Greenberg 1941: DiMaggio 1942: T. Williams 1943: York 1944: Stephens 1945: Etten 1946: Greenberg 1947: T. Williams 1948: DiMaggio 1949: T. Williams & Stephens 1950: Dropo & Stephens 1951: Zernial 1952: Rosen 1953: Rosen 1954: Doby 1955: R. Boone & Jensen 1956: Mantle 1957: Sievers 1958: Jensen 1959: Jensen 1960: Maris 1961: Gentile & Maris 1962: Killebrew 1963: Stuart 1964: B. Robinson 1965: Colavito 1966: F. Robinson 1967: Yastrzemski 1968: Harrelson 1969: Killebrew 1970: Howard 1971: Killebrew 1972: Allen 1973: Jackson 1974: Burroughs 1975: Scott 1976: May 1977: Hisle 1978: Rice 1979: Baylor 1980: Cooper 1981: Murray 1982: McRae 1983: Rice & Cooper 1984: Armas 1985: Mattingly 1986: Carter 1987: Bell 1988: Canseco 1989: Sierra 1990: Fielder 1991: Fielder 1992: Fielder 1993: Belle 1994: Puckett 1995: Belle & Vaughn 1996: Belle 1997: Griffey Jr. 1998: González 1999: Ramirez 2000: Martínez 2001: B. Boone 2002: Rodriguez 2003: Delgado 2004: Tejada 2005: Ortiz 2006: Ortiz 2007: Rodriguez 2008: Hamilton 2009: Teixeira 2010: Cabrera 2011: Granderson 2012: Cabrera 2013: C. Davis 2014: Trout 2015: Donaldson 2016: Encarnación & Ortiz 2017: Cruz

v t e

American League
American League
First Baseman Silver Slugger Award

1980: Cooper 1981: Cooper 1982: Cooper 1983: Murray 1984: Murray 1985: Mattingly 1986: Mattingly 1987: Mattingly 1988: Brett 1989: McGriff 1990: C. Fielder 1991: C. Fielder 1992: McGwire 1993: Thomas 1994: Thomas 1995: Vaughn 1996: McGwire 1997: Martinez 1998: Palmeiro 1999: Delgado 2000: Delgado 2001: Giambi 2002: Giambi 2003: Delgado 2004: Teixeira 2005: Teixeira 2006: Morneau 2007: Peña 2008: Morneau 2009: Teixeira 2010: Cabrera 2011: Gonzalez 2012: P. Fielder 2013: Davis 2014: Abreu 2015: Cabrera 2016: Cabrera 2017: Hosmer

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 6648443 LCC

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