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Minsk Region or Minsk Voblasć or Minsk Oblast (Belarusian: Мі́нская во́бласць, Minskaja voblasć [ˈmʲinskaja ˈvobɫasʲtsʲ]; Russian: Минская о́бласть, Minskaja oblastj) is one of the regions of Belarus. Its administrative center is Minsk, although it is a separate administrative territorial entity of Belarus. As of 2011, the region's population is 1,411,500.[1]

Contents

1 Geography 2 History 3 Tourism 4 Administrative subdivisions

4.1 Cities and towns

5 See also 6 References 7 External links

Geography[edit] Minsk Region covers a total area of 39,900 km²,[1] about 19.44% of the national total. Lake Narach, the largest lake in the country, is located in the northern part of the region. There are four other large lakes in this region: Svir (8th largest), Myadel (11th largest), Selyava (14th largest) and Myastro (15th largest).[2] It is the only region of Belarus whose border is not part of the international border of Belarus. History[edit] From the beginning of the 10th century, the territory of the current Minsk Region was part of Kievan Rus'; later, a part of the Principality of Polotsk; then, was absorbed by the Grand Duchy of Lithuania after its formation. With the unification of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania and the Kingdom of Poland, the territory became part of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. In 1793, as a result of the second partition of Polish territory, the area was annexed by Russia as the Minsk Region. During the collapse of the Russian Empire and the Civil War, the western part was annexed to Poland in 1921, while the east became Soviet Belarus. The Minsk region was formed on 15 January 1938 based on an amendment of the Constitutional Law of the USSR. As of 20 February 1938, the area included 20 districts. Following the Soviet invasion of Poland on September 17, 1939, the former Eastern lands of the Second Polish Republic were annexed in accordance with the Molotov–Ribbentrop Pact partitioning Poland and added to the Minsk Region. On 20 September 1944, by the decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR, the Gressky, Kopyl, Krasnoslobodski, Luban, Slutsky, Starobin, Starodorozhski districts and the city of Sluck were removed from the Minsk region and transferred to the newly formed Bobruisk Region. On 8 January 1954, by the decree of the Presidium of the Supreme Soviet of the USSR, the Nesvizhski and Stolbtsovsky districts from the abolished Baranovichi Region, as well as the Glusk, Gressky, Kopyl, Krasnoslobodski, Luban, Slutsky, Starobin, Starodorozhski districts and the city of Sluck from the abolished Bobruisk Region, were appended to the Minsk Region. In 1960, following the abolition of Molodechno Region, its southern part became the northern part of the Minsk Region. Tourism[edit] The number of travel agencies in Minsk Region grew from twelve in 2000 to seventy in 2010.[3][4] The most popular tourist destinations of the region are Zaslavskoye Lake, the Zhdanovichi area which has health resorts, Nesvizh Palace and its surroundings, as well as the alpine ski resorts of Logoysk and Silichi. Administrative subdivisions[edit] The Minsk Region comprises 22 districts (raions), 307 selsovets, 22 cities, 8 city municipalities, and 20 urban-type settlements.

Barysaw District Byerazino District Chervyen District Dzyarzhynsk District Kapyl District Kletsk District Krupki District Lahoysk District Lyuban District Maladzyechna District Minsk District Myadzyel District Nesvizh District Pukhavichy District Salihorsk District Slutsk District Smalyavichy District Staryya Darohi District Stowbtsy District Uzda District Valozhyn District Vileyka District

Cities and towns[edit]

Minsk[5] (Belarusian: Мінск; Russian: Минск) - 1,901,700 Barysaw (Belarusian: Барысаў; Russian: Борисов) - 180,100 Salihorsk (Belarusian: Салігорск; Russian: Солигорск) - 102,335 Maladzyechna (Belarusian: Маладзечна; Russian: Молодечно) - 98,514 Slutsk (Belarusian: Слуцк; Russian: Слуцк) - 62,300 Zhodzina (Belarusian: Жодзiна; Russian: Жодино) - 61,800 Vileyka (Belarusian: Вілейка; Russian: Вилейка) - 30,000 Dzyarzhynsk (Belarusian: Дзяржынск; Russian: Дзержинск) - 24,600 Maryina Horka (Belarusian: Мар'іна Горка; Russian: Марьина Горка) - 23,400 Stowbtsy (Belarusian: Стоўбцы; Russian: Столбцы) - 16,900 Nyasvizh (Belarusian: Нясвіж; Russian: Несвиж) - 14,300 Smalyavichy (Belarusian: Смалявічы; Russian: Смолевичи) - 14,200 Zaslawye (Belarusian: Заслаўе; Russian: Заславль) - 13,500 Fanipal (Belarusian: Фаніпаль; Russian: Фаниполь) - 13,200 Berazino (Belarusian: Беразіно; Russian: Березино) - 13,100 Lyuban (Belarusian: Любань; Russian: Любань) - 11,800 Staryya Darohi (Belarusian: Старыя Дарогі; Russian: Старые Дороги) - 11,700 Valozhyn (Belarusian: Валожын; Russian: Воложин) - 11,400 Lahoysk (Belarusian: Лагойск; Russian: Логойск) - 11,000 Kapyl (Belarusian: Капыль; Russian: Копыль) - 10,700 Kletsk (Belarusian: Клецк; Russian: Клецк) - 10,600 Chervyen’ (Belarusian: Чэрвень; Russian: Червень) - 10,500 Uzda (Belarusian: Узда; Russian: Узда) - 10,000 Krupki (Belarusian: Крупкі; Russian: Крупки) - 8,300 Myadzyel (Belarusian: Мядзел; Russian: Мядель) - 7,100

See also[edit]

Administrative divisions of Belarus Villages in Minsk Region

References[edit]

^ a b c "Territory and population density of Belarus by region as of January 1, 2011. Main Geographic Characteristics of the Republic of Belarus". Land of Ancestors. the Scientific and Production State Republican Unitary Enterprise “National Cadastre Agency” of the State Property Committee of the Republic of Belarus. 2011. Retrieved 30 August 2013.  ^ "Main characteristics of the largest lakes of Belarus". Land of Ancestors. Data of the Research Laboratory for Lake Study of the Belarus State University. 2011. Retrieved 29 September 2013.  ^ Ministry of Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Belarus. (2011). "Number of organizations engaged in tourist activities in 2010 in Belarus". Land of Ancestors. National Statistical Committee of the Republic of Belarus. Retrieved 9 October 2013.  ^ Ministry of Sports and Tourism of the Republic of Belarus. (2011). "Number of organisations engaged in tourist activities in Belarus by region". Land of Ancestors. National Statistical Committee of the Republic of Belarus. Retrieved 9 October 2013.  ^ Seat of the Minsk Region but administratively separated

External links[edit]

Wikisource has the text of a 1911 Encyclopædia Britannica article about Minsk Region.

Media related to Minsk Region at Wikimedia Commons

v t e

Subdivisions of Minsk Region, Belarus

Districts (raiony)

Barysaw Byerazino Chervyen Dzyarzhynsk Kapyl Kletsk Krupki Lahoysk Lyuban Maladzyechna Minsk Myadzyel Nyasvizh Pukhavichy Salihorsk Slutsk Smalyavichy Staryya Darohi Stowbtsy Uzda Valozhyn Vileyka

Cities

Barysaw Byerazino Chervyen Dzyarzhynsk Fanipal Kapyl Kletsk Krupki Lahoysk Lyuban Maladzyechna Maryina Horka Minsk1 Myadzyel Nyasvizh Salihorsk Slutsk Smalyavichy Staryya Darohi Stowbtsy Uzda Valozhyn Vileyka Zaslawye Zhodzina

1 Seat of Minsk Region but administratively separated

v t e

First-level administrative divisions of Belarus

Brest Gomel Grodno Minsk Minsk (city)1 Mogilev Vitebsk

1 A municipality ("horad") rather than a province ("voblast") [1]

Coordinates: 53°40′N 27°45′E / 53.667°N 27.750°E / 53

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