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The Info List - Miles Lerman


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Miles Lerman
Miles Lerman
(1920 – January 22, 2008) was a Polish-born American who helped to plan and create the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and the memorial at the Bełżec extermination camp.[1] Lerman, a Holocaust survivor
Holocaust survivor
himself, had fought as a Jewish
Jewish
resistance fighter during World War II
World War II
in Nazi German occupied Poland.[1]

Contents

1 Early life 2 United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum 3 Death 4 References 5 External links

Early life[edit] Lerman was born as Szmuel Milek Lerman in Tomaszów Lubelski, Poland, in 1920.[1] His parents were Israel and Yochevet Feldzon Lerman and he was one of five children.[1] His mother, Yochevet, owned an import and export grocery business.[1] His father, Israel, owned several businesses throughout eastern Poland, including several flour mills in Eastern Poland
Poland
and wholesale liquor and gasoline businesses.[1][2] Lerman and his family fled to the city of Lwów following the Nazi invasion of Poland
Poland
in 1939.[1] In 1941 Lerman was captured and sent to the Vinniki
Vinniki
forced labor camp.[2][3] However, he managed to escape the camp. He spent the next 23 months as a Jewish
Jewish
resistance fighter hidden in the forests surrounding Lwów.[1] He went to the Polish city of Łódź
Łódź
following the end of the war.[1] There he met his wife, Krysia Rozalia Laks, whom he married in a Displaced Persons camp.[1] The couple emigrated together to the United States in 1947.[1] Lerman arrived in New York City
New York City
in 1947 before moving to Vineland, New Jersey, in 1948.[3] Lerman purchased a poultry farm in Vineland.[1] He also started a series of successful real estate, gasoline and heating businesses.[1] United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum[edit] Miles Lerman's involvement with the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Museum can be traced to 1979.[1] That year, United States
United States
President Jimmy Carter named Lerman to the President’s Commission advisory board on the Holocaust.[1] One of the Commission's main tasks was the creation of a museum dedicated to the remembrance of the Holocaust.[1] The United States
United States
Congress passed a legislation granting land on the National Mall
National Mall
in Washington D.C.
Washington D.C.
for the purpose of building the museum.[1] However, all funds for the construction of the museum had to be raised privately.[1] Lerman, who became chairman of the Campaign to Remember, and the committee managed to raise $190 million in order to construct and endow the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum.[1] He also served simultaneously as the chairman of the future museum's International Relations Committee, which was charged with negotiating with Eastern European nations in order to obtain artifacts focusing on Jewish
Jewish
life and the Holocaust
Holocaust
for the museum's permanent collection.[1] Lerman's IR Committee managed to obtain a number of important artifacts, including actual barracks from the Birkenau concentration camp, a railroad boxcar used to transport Jewish
Jewish
prisoners to Treblinka, over 5,000 shoes from Majdanek
Majdanek
and various toothbrushes, suitcases and other personal items from Auschwitz.[1] Lerman served as chairman of the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum's governing board from the time of its opening on April 22, 1993, until he left the museum in 2000.[1] Additionally, Lerman helped to found the museum's Committee on Conscience, which works to draw attention to contemporary genocide issues, such as the current Darfur crisis.[1] Lerman, who spoke several languages, returned to his native Poland following his departure from the museum in 2000.[1] There he campaigned for a proper memorial for his family members (both his parents perished in Belzec), as well as the other estimated 500,000 Jews who died at the Belzec extermination camp.[1] The existing Communist era memorial, which stood in a former garbage dump, made no mention of Jewish
Jewish
Holocaust
Holocaust
victims.[1] Lerman raised approximately 5 million dollars to build a new memorial by teaming up with the Polish government and the American Jewish
Jewish
Committee.[1] Miles Lerman
Miles Lerman
spoke at the dedication of the new Belzec memorial, which was held on June 3, 2004, telling the story of 9 year old Deborah Katz, one of the death camp's estimated 500,000 to 600,000 victims.[4] [5] Death[edit] Miles Lerman
Miles Lerman
died at his home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 22, 2008, at the age of 88.[1] He was buried in Alliance Cemetery in Vineland, New Jersey.[3] He was survived by his wife, Chris, whose real name is Krysia Rozalia Laks, his daughter, philanthropist Jeanette Lerman-Neubauer; his son David and his brother, Jona.[1] References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac Hevesi, Dennis (2008-01-24). "Miles Lerman, a Leading Force Behind Holocaust Museum, Dies at 88". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-02-12.  ^ a b "Members of the administrative staff of the Schlachtensee displaced persons camp pose in the office of UNRRA camp director Schwartzberg", photoarchives of the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum; includes a text based on an interview with Miles Lehman on July 17, 2001 ^ a b c Landau, Joel (2008-01-24). "Lerman recalled as vocal Holocaust survivor, Jewish
Jewish
history activist". Vineland Daily Journal. Retrieved 2008-02-12. [dead link] ^ "March of the Living" (PDF).  ^ "Belzec Memorial Dedication". 

External links[edit]

United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum Committee on Conscience Vineland Daily Journal: Lerman recalled as vocal Holocaust
Holocaust
survivor, Jewish
Jewish
history activist[permanent dead link] New York Times: Miles Lerman, a Leading Force Behind Holocaust
Holocaust
Museum, Dies at 88

v t e

The Holocaust
Holocaust
in Poland

Main article The Holocaust Related articles by country Belarus Belgium Croatia Denmark Estonia France Latvia Lithuania Norway Russia Ukraine

v t e

Camps, ghettos and operations

Camps

Extermination

Auschwitz-Birkenau Chełmno Majdanek Operation Reinhard
Operation Reinhard
death camps

Bełżec Sobibór Treblinka

Concentration

Kraków-Płaszów Potulice Soldau Stutthof Szebnie Trawniki Warsaw

Mass shootings

AB Action Bronna Góra Erntefest Jedwabne Kielce cemetery Aktion Krakau Lviv
Lviv
pogroms Lwów professors Palmiry Sonderaktion Krakau Tannenberg Tykocin Bydgoszcz Wąsosz Bloody Sunday

Ghettos

List of 277 Jewish
Jewish
ghettos in German-occupied Poland
Poland
(1939–1942) Będzin Białystok Brest Częstochowa Grodno Kielce Kraków Lwów Łódź Lubartów Lublin Międzyrzec Podlaski Mizocz Nowy Sącz Pińsk Radom Siedlce Sambor Słonim Sosnowiec Stanisławów Tarnopol Wilno Warsaw

Other atrocities

Action T4 Grossaktion Warsaw Human medical experimentation

v t e

Perpetrators, participants, organizations, and collaborators

Major perpetrators

Organizers

Josef Bühler Eichmann Eicke Ludwig Fischer Hans Frank Globocnik Glücks Greiser Himmler Hermann Höfle Fritz Katzmann Wilhelm Koppe Friedrich-Wilhelm Krüger Kutschera Erwin Lambert Ernst Lerch Oswald Pohl Reinefarth Scherner Seyss-Inquart Sporrenberg Streckenbach Thomalla Otto Wächter Wisliceny

Camp command

Aumeier Baer Boger Braunsteiner Eberl Eupen Kurt Franz Karl Frenzel Karl Fritzsch Göth Grabner Hartjenstein Hering Höss Hössler Josef Kramer Liebehenschel Mandel Matthes Michel Möckel Mulka Johann Niemann Oberhauser Reichleitner Heinrich Schwarz Stangl Gustav Wagner Christian Wirth

Gas chamber executioners

Erich Bauer Bolender Hackenholt Klehr Hans Koch Herbert Lange Theuer

Physicians

von Bodmann Clauberg Gebhardt Fritz Klein Mengele Horst Schumann Trzebinski Eduard Wirths

Ghetto command

Auerswald Biebow Blösche Bürkl Konrad Palfinger von Sammern-Frankenegg Stroop

Einsatzgruppen

Wolfgang Birkner Blobel Felix Landau Schaper Schöngarth von Woyrsch

Personnel

Camp guards

Juana Bormann Danz Demjanjuk Margot Dreschel Kurt Gerstein Grese Höcker Kaduk Kollmer Muhsfeldt Orlowski Volkenrath

By camp

Sobibór Treblinka

Organizations

Einsatzgruppen
Einsatzgruppen
(SS) Ordnungspolizei
Ordnungspolizei
(Orpo battalions) WVHA RKFDV VoMi General Government Hotel Polski

Collaboration

Belarusian

Belarusian Auxiliary Police BKA battalions Brigade Siegling Black Cats Central Rada

Jewish

Jewish
Jewish
Ghetto Police Żagiew ("Torch Guard") Group 13 Kapos Judenräte

Russian

Waffen-SS "RONA" Waffen-SS "Russland" Ostlegionen, Bataillone (Cossack Division, Russian "ROA")

Ukrainian

Ukrainian Auxiliary Police SS Galizien Ukrainian Liberation Army Schutzmannschaft
Schutzmannschaft
(Battalion 118, Brigade Siegling, 30. Waffen SS Grenadier Division) Trawnikimänner

Other nationalities

Estonian Auxiliary Police Latvian Auxiliary Police
Latvian Auxiliary Police
(Arajs Kommando) Lithuanian Auxiliary Police Battalions
Lithuanian Auxiliary Police Battalions
(Schutzmannschaft, Ypatingasis būrys) Pieter Menten
Pieter Menten
(Nederlandsche SS)

v t e

Resistance: Judenrat, victims, documentation and technical

Organizations

AK AOB Bund GL PKB ŻOB ŻZA

Uprisings

Ghetto uprisings Białystok Częstochowa Sobibór Treblinka Warsaw Ghetto
Warsaw Ghetto
Uprising

Leaders

Mordechai Anielewicz Icchak Cukierman Mordechai Tenenbaum Marek Edelman Leon Feldhendler Paweł Frenkiel Henryk Iwański Itzhak Katzenelson Michał Klepfisz Miles Lerman Alexander Pechersky Witold Pilecki Frumka Płotnicka Roza Robota Szmul Zygielbojm

Judenrat

Jewish
Jewish
Ghetto Police Adam Czerniaków Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski

Victim lists

Ghettos

Kraków Łódź Lvov (Lwów) Warsaw

Camps

Auschwitz Bełżec Gross-Rosen Izbica Majdanek Sobibór Soldau Stutthof Trawniki Treblinka

Documentation

Nazi sources

Auschwitz
Auschwitz
Album Frank Memorandum Höcker Album Höfle Telegram Katzmann Report Korherr Report Nisko Plan Posen speeches Special
Special
Prosecution Book-Poland Stroop Report Wannsee Conference

Witness accounts

Graebe affidavit Gerstein Report Vrba–Wetzler report Witold's Report Sonderkommando photographs

Concealment

Sonderaktion 1005

Technical and logistics

Identification in camps Gas chamber Gas van Holocaust
Holocaust
train Human medical experimentation Zyklon B

v t e

Aftermath, trials and commemoration

Aftermath

Holocaust
Holocaust
survivors Polish population transfers (1944–1946) Bricha Kielce pogrom Anti- Jewish
Jewish
violence, 1944–46 Ministry of Public Security

Trials

West German trials

Frankfurt Auschwitz
Auschwitz
trials Treblinka
Treblinka
trials

Polish, East German, and Soviet trials

Auschwitz
Auschwitz
trial (Poland) Stutthof trials Extraordinary (Soviet) State Commission

Memorials

Museum of the History of Polish Jews Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum Majdanek
Majdanek
State Museum Sobibór Museum International Youth Meeting Center in Oświęcim/Auschwitz March of the Living

Righteous Among the Nations

Polish Righteous Among the Nations Rescue of Jews by Poles during the Holocaust Garde

.
l> Miles Lerman
HOME
The Info List - Miles Lerman


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Miles Lerman
Miles Lerman
(1920 – January 22, 2008) was a Polish-born American who helped to plan and create the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C.
Washington, D.C.
and the memorial at the Bełżec extermination camp.[1] Lerman, a Holocaust survivor
Holocaust survivor
himself, had fought as a Jewish
Jewish
resistance fighter during World War II
World War II
in Nazi German occupied Poland.[1]

Contents

1 Early life 2 United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum 3 Death 4 References 5 External links

Early life[edit] Lerman was born as Szmuel Milek Lerman in Tomaszów Lubelski, Poland, in 1920.[1] His parents were Israel and Yochevet Feldzon Lerman and he was one of five children.[1] His mother, Yochevet, owned an import and export grocery business.[1] His father, Israel, owned several businesses throughout eastern Poland, including several flour mills in Eastern Poland
Poland
and wholesale liquor and gasoline businesses.[1][2] Lerman and his family fled to the city of Lwów following the Nazi invasion of Poland
Poland
in 1939.[1] In 1941 Lerman was captured and sent to the Vinniki
Vinniki
forced labor camp.[2][3] However, he managed to escape the camp. He spent the next 23 months as a Jewish
Jewish
resistance fighter hidden in the forests surrounding Lwów.[1] He went to the Polish city of Łódź
Łódź
following the end of the war.[1] There he met his wife, Krysia Rozalia Laks, whom he married in a Displaced Persons camp.[1] The couple emigrated together to the United States in 1947.[1] Lerman arrived in New York City
New York City
in 1947 before moving to Vineland, New Jersey, in 1948.[3] Lerman purchased a poultry farm in Vineland.[1] He also started a series of successful real estate, gasoline and heating businesses.[1] United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum[edit] Miles Lerman's involvement with the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Museum can be traced to 1979.[1] That year, United States
United States
President Jimmy Carter named Lerman to the President’s Commission advisory board on the Holocaust.[1] One of the Commission's main tasks was the creation of a museum dedicated to the remembrance of the Holocaust.[1] The United States
United States
Congress passed a legislation granting land on the National Mall
National Mall
in Washington D.C.
Washington D.C.
for the purpose of building the museum.[1] However, all funds for the construction of the museum had to be raised privately.[1] Lerman, who became chairman of the Campaign to Remember, and the committee managed to raise $190 million in order to construct and endow the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum.[1] He also served simultaneously as the chairman of the future museum's International Relations Committee, which was charged with negotiating with Eastern European nations in order to obtain artifacts focusing on Jewish
Jewish
life and the Holocaust
Holocaust
for the museum's permanent collection.[1] Lerman's IR Committee managed to obtain a number of important artifacts, including actual barracks from the Birkenau concentration camp, a railroad boxcar used to transport Jewish
Jewish
prisoners to Treblinka, over 5,000 shoes from Majdanek
Majdanek
and various toothbrushes, suitcases and other personal items from Auschwitz.[1] Lerman served as chairman of the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum's governing board from the time of its opening on April 22, 1993, until he left the museum in 2000.[1] Additionally, Lerman helped to found the museum's Committee on Conscience, which works to draw attention to contemporary genocide issues, such as the current Darfur crisis.[1] Lerman, who spoke several languages, returned to his native Poland following his departure from the museum in 2000.[1] There he campaigned for a proper memorial for his family members (both his parents perished in Belzec), as well as the other estimated 500,000 Jews who died at the Belzec extermination camp.[1] The existing Communist era memorial, which stood in a former garbage dump, made no mention of Jewish
Jewish
Holocaust
Holocaust
victims.[1] Lerman raised approximately 5 million dollars to build a new memorial by teaming up with the Polish government and the American Jewish
Jewish
Committee.[1] Miles Lerman
Miles Lerman
spoke at the dedication of the new Belzec memorial, which was held on June 3, 2004, telling the story of 9 year old Deborah Katz, one of the death camp's estimated 500,000 to 600,000 victims.[4] [5] Death[edit] Miles Lerman
Miles Lerman
died at his home in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, on January 22, 2008, at the age of 88.[1] He was buried in Alliance Cemetery in Vineland, New Jersey.[3] He was survived by his wife, Chris, whose real name is Krysia Rozalia Laks, his daughter, philanthropist Jeanette Lerman-Neubauer; his son David and his brother, Jona.[1] References[edit]

^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n o p q r s t u v w x y z aa ab ac Hevesi, Dennis (2008-01-24). "Miles Lerman, a Leading Force Behind Holocaust Museum, Dies at 88". New York Times. Retrieved 2008-02-12.  ^ a b "Members of the administrative staff of the Schlachtensee displaced persons camp pose in the office of UNRRA camp director Schwartzberg", photoarchives of the United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum; includes a text based on an interview with Miles Lehman on July 17, 2001 ^ a b c Landau, Joel (2008-01-24). "Lerman recalled as vocal Holocaust survivor, Jewish
Jewish
history activist". Vineland Daily Journal. Retrieved 2008-02-12. [dead link] ^ "March of the Living" (PDF).  ^ "Belzec Memorial Dedication". 

External links[edit]

United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum United States
United States
Holocaust
Holocaust
Memorial Museum Committee on Conscience Vineland Daily Journal: Lerman recalled as vocal Holocaust
Holocaust
survivor, Jewish
Jewish
history activist[permanent dead link] New York Times: Miles Lerman, a Leading Force Behind Holocaust
Holocaust
Museum, Dies at 88

v t e

The Holocaust
Holocaust
in Poland

Main article The Holocaust Related articles by country Belarus Belgium Croatia Denmark Estonia France Latvia Lithuania Norway Russia Ukraine

v t e

Camps, ghettos and operations

Camps

Extermination

Auschwitz-Birkenau Chełmno Majdanek Operation Reinhard
Operation Reinhard
death camps

Bełżec Sobibór Treblinka

Concentration

Kraków-Płaszów Potulice Soldau Stutthof Szebnie Trawniki Warsaw

Mass shootings

AB Action Bronna Góra Erntefest Jedwabne Kielce cemetery Aktion Krakau Lviv
Lviv
pogroms Lwów professors Palmiry Sonderaktion Krakau Tannenberg Tykocin Bydgoszcz Wąsosz Bloody Sunday

Ghettos

List of 277 Jewish
Jewish
ghettos in German-occupied Poland
Poland
(1939–1942) Będzin Białystok Brest Częstochowa Grodno Kielce Kraków Lwów Łódź Lubartów Lublin Międzyrzec Podlaski Mizocz Nowy Sącz Pińsk Radom Siedlce Sambor Słonim Sosnowiec Stanisławów Tarnopol Wilno Warsaw

Other atrocities

Action T4 Grossaktion Warsaw Human medical experimentation

v t e

Perpetrators, participants, organizations, and collaborators

Major perpetrators

Organizers

Josef Bühler Eichmann Eicke Ludwig Fischer Hans Frank Globocnik Glücks Greiser Himmler Hermann Höfle Fritz Katzmann Wilhelm Koppe Friedrich-Wilhelm Krüger Kutschera Erwin Lambert Ernst Lerch Oswald Pohl Reinefarth Scherner Seyss-Inquart Sporrenberg Streckenbach Thomalla Otto Wächter Wisliceny

Camp command

Aumeier Baer Boger Braunsteiner Eberl Eupen Kurt Franz Karl Frenzel Karl Fritzsch Göth Grabner Hartjenstein Hering Höss Hössler Josef Kramer Liebehenschel Mandel Matthes Michel Möckel Mulka Johann Niemann Oberhauser Reichleitner Heinrich Schwarz Stangl Gustav Wagner Christian Wirth

Gas chamber executioners

Erich Bauer Bolender Hackenholt Klehr Hans Koch Herbert Lange Theuer

Physicians

von Bodmann Clauberg Gebhardt Fritz Klein Mengele Horst Schumann Trzebinski Eduard Wirths

Ghetto command

Auerswald Biebow Blösche Bürkl Konrad Palfinger von Sammern-Frankenegg Stroop

Einsatzgruppen

Wolfgang Birkner Blobel Felix Landau Schaper Schöngarth von Woyrsch

Personnel

Camp guards

Juana Bormann Danz Demjanjuk Margot Dreschel Kurt Gerstein Grese Höcker Kaduk Kollmer Muhsfeldt Orlowski Volkenrath

By camp

Sobibór Treblinka

Organizations

Einsatzgruppen
Einsatzgruppen
(SS) Ordnungspolizei
Ordnungspolizei
(Orpo battalions) WVHA RKFDV VoMi General Government Hotel Polski

Collaboration

Belarusian

Belarusian Auxiliary Police BKA battalions Brigade Siegling Black Cats Central Rada

Jewish

Jewish
Jewish
Ghetto Police Żagiew ("Torch Guard") Group 13 Kapos Judenräte

Russian

Waffen-SS "RONA" Waffen-SS "Russland" Ostlegionen, Bataillone (Cossack Division, Russian "ROA")

Ukrainian

Ukrainian Auxiliary Police SS Galizien Ukrainian Liberation Army Schutzmannschaft
Schutzmannschaft
(Battalion 118, Brigade Siegling, 30. Waffen SS Grenadier Division) Trawnikimänner

Other nationalities

Estonian Auxiliary Police Latvian Auxiliary Police
Latvian Auxiliary Police
(Arajs Kommando) Lithuanian Auxiliary Police Battalions
Lithuanian Auxiliary Police Battalions
(Schutzmannschaft, Ypatingasis būrys) Pieter Menten
Pieter Menten
(Nederlandsche SS)

v t e

Resistance: Judenrat, victims, documentation and technical

Organizations

AK AOB Bund GL PKB ŻOB ŻZA

Uprisings

Ghetto uprisings Białystok Częstochowa Sobibór Treblinka Warsaw Ghetto
Warsaw Ghetto
Uprising

Leaders

Mordechai Anielewicz Icchak Cukierman Mordechai Tenenbaum Marek Edelman Leon Feldhendler Paweł Frenkiel Henryk Iwański Itzhak Katzenelson Michał Klepfisz Miles Lerman Alexander Pechersky Witold Pilecki Frumka Płotnicka Roza Robota Szmul Zygielbojm

Judenrat

Jewish
Jewish
Ghetto Police Adam Czerniaków Mordechai Chaim Rumkowski

Victim lists

Ghettos

Kraków Łódź Lvov (Lwów) Warsaw

Camps

Auschwitz Bełżec Gross-Rosen Izbica Majdanek Sobibór Soldau Stutthof Trawniki Treblinka

Documentation

Nazi sources

Auschwitz
Auschwitz
Album Frank Memorandum Höcker Album Höfle Telegram Katzmann Report Korherr Report Nisko Plan Posen speeches Special
Special
Prosecution Book-Poland Stroop Report Wannsee Conference

Witness accounts

Graebe affidavit Gerstein Report Vrba–Wetzler report Witold's Report Sonderkommando photographs

Concealment

Sonderaktion 1005

Technical and logistics

Identification in camps Gas chamber Gas van Holocaust
Holocaust
train Human medical experimentation Zyklon B

v t e

Aftermath, trials and commemoration

Aftermath

Holocaust
Holocaust
survivors Polish population transfers (1944–1946) Bricha Kielce pogrom Anti- Jewish
Jewish
violence, 1944–46 Ministry of Public Security

Trials

West German trials

Frankfurt Auschwitz
Auschwitz
trials Treblinka
Treblinka
trials

Polish, East German, and Soviet trials

Auschwitz
Auschwitz
trial (Poland) Stutthof trials Extraordinary (Soviet) State Commission

Memorials

Museum of the History of Polish Jews Auschwitz-Birkenau Memorial and Museum Majdanek
Majdanek
State Museum Sobibór Museum International Youth Meeting Center in Oświęcim/Auschwitz March of the Living

Righteous Among the Nations

Polish Righteous Among the Nations Rescue of Jews by Poles during the Holocaust Garde

.

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