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Michel Bernard Barnier (born 9 January 1951) is a French politician serving as European Chief Negotiator for the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
Exiting the European Union
European Union
since December 2016. He has served in several French cabinet positions such as Minister of Foreign Affairs from 2004 to 2005, Minister of State for European Affairs from 1995 to 1997, and Minister of the Environment and Way of Life from 1993 to 1995. He also served at European level as European Commissioner for Regional Policy (1999–2004) and European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services (2010–2014); he also was Vice President of the European People's Party
European People's Party
from 2010 to 2015. Barnier was appointed Minister for Agriculture in the French government on 18 June 2007, stepping down on 7 June 2009 upon his election as a Member of the European Parliament
Member of the European Parliament
(MEP). He served as European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services
European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services
under Barroso. The European Commission
European Commission
has appointed him as their Chief Negotiator in charge of the Preparation and Conduct of the Negotiations with the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union (TEU).[1][2]

Contents

1 Early life and education 2 Political career

2.1 National politics 2.2 European politics

3 Timeline 4 Other activities 5 Honours 6 References 7 External links

Early life and education[edit] Born at La Tronche
La Tronche
in the French Alps, into a Gaullist
Gaullist
family in 1951, Barnier graduated from the ESCP Europe
ESCP Europe
business school in 1972. Political career[edit] National politics[edit] Barnier served on the staff of various Gaullist
Gaullist
ministers in the 1970s, before being elected in 1978, aged 27, to the French National Assembly as Deputy for the Department of Savoie
Savoie
representing the neo-Gaullists, Rally for the Republic
Rally for the Republic
(RPR), serving until 1993. Together with Jean-Claude Killy he organised the 1992 Winter Olympics in Albertville
Albertville
as co-president of the COJO (Comité d'Organisation des Jeux Olympiques). Barnier first joined the French Cabinet as Minister of the Environment following the Right's landslide victory in the 1993 legislative election. In 1995, Jacques Chirac
Jacques Chirac
appointed him Secretary of State for European Affairs, serving as such until the defeat of the presidential majority in the 1997 legislative election. Barnier then served as a European Commissioner for Regional Policy in the Prodi Commission
Prodi Commission
from 1999 until 31 March 2004. Then he served as Foreign Minister of France in Jean-Pierre Raffarin's government until 5 June 2005 when Dominique de Villepin replaced him with Philippe Douste-Blazy. He considered he was unjustly sanctioned for the victory of the "No" in the French referendum over the European Constitution. In March 2006, Barnier was elected Vice President of the European People's Party (EPP) for a three-year term. Under Nicolas Sarkozy's presidency, upon the reshuffle of the French cabinet, caused by the resignation of Alain Juppé
Alain Juppé
after the 2007 French legislative election, he re-joined the French Cabinet as Minister of Agriculture. European politics[edit]

Barnier and Joseph Daul
Joseph Daul
in 2008

Barnier worked in 2006 as a special adviser to José Manuel Barroso, the then President of the European Commission, and presented a report to the Council of Ministers proposing the creation of a European civil-protection force.[3] In 2006–2007, he served as member of the Amato Group, a group of high-level European politicians unofficially working on rewriting the Treaty establishing a Constitution for Europe into what became known as the Treaty of Lisbon
Treaty of Lisbon
following its rejection by French and Dutch voters. Barnier led the UMP list in Ile-de- France
France
for the 2009 European Parliament election. In February 2010 he was confirmed as European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services.[4][5][6] In charge of European banking system reform, he argues for a "coherent single market with intelligent rules that apply everywhere".[7] He was twice appointed Acting Commissioner for Industry and Entrepreneurship in Antonio Tajani's stead, from 19 April 2014 to 25 May 2014 while he was on electoral campaign leave for the 2014 elections to the European Parliament
European Parliament
and from 1 July 2014 to 16 July 2014 after he took up his seat.[8][9] As European Commissioner
European Commissioner
for Internal Market and Services, Barnier handled many important issues, such as the reform of the financial sector (40 pieces of legislation between 2010 and 2014), the banking union (starting with the Single Supervisory Mechanism) and the digital single market.[10] From 2015, Barnier served as unpaid Special
Special
Adviser on European Defence Policy to President of the European Commission
European Commission
Jean-Claude Juncker.[11][12] On 27 July 2016, he was announced as the European Commission's chief negotiator with the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
over leaving the European Union, under Article 50 of the Treaty on European Union. Commenting on the appointment, Juncker said "I wanted an experienced politician for this difficult job."[13]

Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
and Boyko Borisov
Boyko Borisov
at the 2011 EPP summit at Bouchout Castle, Meise

Timeline[edit]

Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
2014 in the European parliament

European Commission European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services
European Commissioner for Internal Market and Services
2010–14 European Commissioner for Regional Policy 1999–2004 French Government Minister of Agriculture and Fisheries 2007–09 Minister of Foreign Affairs 2004–05 Minister of European Affairs 1995–97 Minister of the Environment 1993–95 Electoral mandates European Parliament Member of European Parliament
European Parliament
2009–10 (resignation) National Assembly of France Member of the National Assembly of France
France
for Savoie
Savoie
1978–93 (became minister in 1993). Elected in 1978, reelected in 1981, 1986, 1988, 1993. Senate of France Senator of Savoie. Elected in 1995, but remains minister 1997–1999 (resignation; became European commissioner
European commissioner
in 1999). General Council President of the General Council of Savoie
Savoie
1982–99 (resignation; became European commissioner
European commissioner
in 1999). Reelected in 1985, 1988, 1992, 1994, 1998. General councillor of Savoie
Savoie
1973–99 (resignation, became European commissioner in 1999). Reelected in 1979, 1985, 1992, 1998. Other activities[edit]

International Olympic Committee
International Olympic Committee
(IOC), Member of the Sustainability and Legacy Commission[14]

Honours[edit]

Officer, Légion d'honneur Grand Cross, Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany

References[edit]

^ " European Commission
European Commission
– PRESS RELEASES – Press release – President Juncker appoints Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
as Chief Negotiator in charge of the Preparation and Conduct of the Negotiations with the United Kingdom
United Kingdom
under Article 50 of the TEU". europa.eu.  ^ "Commission sets up Brexit
Brexit
'taskforce'". euobserver.com.  ^ Barnier as special adviser European Voice, February 19, 2015. ^ " Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
to take over internal market portfolio". Euobserver. 2009-11-27.  ^ Philip Aldrick (30 Nov 2009). " Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
looks to calm City nerves about reform". The Telegraph. London.  ^ "Summary of Hearing of Michel Barnier". European Parliament. 13 January 2010. Archived from the original on 24 September 2015.  ^ Castle, Stephen (12 July 2013). " European Union
European Union
Offers Berlin Compromise on Bank Proposal". The New York Times.  ^ "Six commissioners head for EU election campaign trail".  ^ KUNA – Barroso announces caretaker replacements following resignation of 4 EU Commissioners ^ Five years of laying the foundations of new growth in Europe (PDF). European Commission. 2014.  ^ Special
Special
Advisers to the President, Vice-Presidents and Commissioners of the European Commission
European Commission
European Commission. ^ Simon Taylor (March 9, 2015), European Commission
European Commission
special advisers European Voice. ^ Khan, Mehreen (27 July 2016). " Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
appointed as Juncker's Brexit
Brexit
chief". Financial Times. Retrieved 27 July 2016.  ^ Sustainability and Legacy Commission International Olympic Committee (IOC).

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Michel Barnier.

Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
– Head of EU Commission Taskforce for Brexit Personal Website at the European Commission
European Commission
(2010–2014)

Political offices

Preceded by Yves-Thibault de Silguy French European Commissioner 1999–2004 Served alongside: Pascal Lamy Succeeded by Jacques Barrot

Preceded by Édith Cresson

Preceded by Monika Wulf-Mathies European Commissioner
European Commissioner
for Regional Policy 1999–2004

Preceded by Dominique de Villepin Minister of Foreign Affairs 2004–2005 Succeeded by Philippe Douste-Blazy

Preceded by Jacques Barrot French European Commissioner 2010–2014 Succeeded by Pierre Moscovici

Preceded by Charlie McCreevy European Commissioner
European Commissioner
for Internal Market and Services 2010–2014 Succeeded by Elżbieta Bieńkowska as European Commissioner
European Commissioner
for Internal Market, Industry, Entrepreneurship and SMEs

Succeeded by Jonathan Hill as European Commissioner
European Commissioner
for Financial Stability, Financial Services and Capital Markets Union

v t e

Barroso Commission
Barroso Commission
II (2009–14)

Foreign Affairs and Security Policy

Catherine Ashton1 (2010–14)

Justice, Fundamental Rights and Citizenship

Viviane Reding2 (2010–2014) Martine Reicherts (2014)

Competition

Joaquín Almunia2 (2010–14)

Transport

Siim Kallas2 (2010–14)

Digital Agenda

Neelie Kroes2 (2010–14)

Industry and Entrepreneurship

Antonio Tajani2 (2010–14) Ferdinando Nelli Feroci (2014)

Inter-Institutional Relations and Administration

Maroš Šefčovič2 (2010–14)

Economic and Monetary Affairs and the Euro

Olli Rehn2 (2010–14) Jyrki Katainen2 (2014)

Environment

Janez Potočnik
Janez Potočnik
(2010–14)

Development

Andris Piebalgs
Andris Piebalgs
(2010–14)

Internal Market and Services

Michel Barnier2 (2010–14)

Education, Culture, Multilingualism and Youth

Androulla Vassiliou
Androulla Vassiliou
(2010–14)

Taxation and Customs Union, Audit and Anti-Fraud

Algirdas Šemeta
Algirdas Šemeta
(2010–14)

Trade

Karel De Gucht
Karel De Gucht
(2010–14)

Health

John Dalli
John Dalli
(2010-12) Tonio Borg
Tonio Borg
(2012–14)

Research, Innovation and Science

Máire Geoghegan-Quinn
Máire Geoghegan-Quinn
(2010–14)

Financial Programming and the Budget

Janusz Lewandowski
Janusz Lewandowski
(2010–14) Jacek Dominik (2014)

Maritime Affairs and Fisheries

Maria Damanaki
Maria Damanaki
(2010–14)

International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis

Kristalina Georgieva
Kristalina Georgieva
(2010–14)

Energy

Günther Oettinger2 (2010–14)

Regional Policy

Johannes Hahn
Johannes Hahn
(2010–14)

Climate Action

Connie Hedegaard
Connie Hedegaard
(2010–14)

Enlargement and European Neighbourhood Policy

Štefan Füle
Štefan Füle
(2010–14)

Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion

László Andor
László Andor
(2010–14)

Home Affairs

Cecilia Malmström
Cecilia Malmström
(2010–14)

Agriculture and Rural Development

Dacian Cioloș
Dacian Cioloș
(2010–14)

Consumer Policy

Neven Mimica (2013–14)

1 = First Vice President. 2 = Vice President.

v t e

Foreign Ministers of France

Ancien Régime

Revol Villeroy A. J. Richelieu Sillery R. Phélypeaux Bouthillier Chavigny Brienne Lionne Pomponne Croissy Torcy Huxelles Dubois Morville Chauvelin Chaillou Noailles Argenson Puisieulx Saint-Contest Rouillé Bernis E. Choiseul C. Choiseul E. Choiseul L. Phélypeaux Aiguillon Bertin Vergennes Montmorin Vauguyon Montmorin Lessart Dumouriez Naillac Chambonas Dubouchage Sainte-Croix

First Republic

Lebrun-Tondu Deforgues Goujon Herman Delacroix Talleyrand Reinhard Talleyrand

First Empire

Talleyrand Champagny Bassano Caulaincourt

First Restoration

Laforest Talleyrand

Hundred Days

Caulaincourt Bignon

Second Restoration

Talleyrand A. E. Richelieu Dessolles Pasquier M. Montmorency Chateaubriand Damas La Ferronays Montmorency-Laval Portalis Polignac Mortemart

July Monarchy

Bignon Jourdan Molé Maison Sébastiani V. Broglie Rigny Bresson Rigny V. Broglie Thiers Molé Montebello Soult Thiers Guizot

Second Republic

Lamartine Bastide Bedeau Bastide Drouyn de Lhuys Tocqueville Rayneval La Hitte Drouyn de Lhuys Brénier Baroche Turgot Drouyn de Lhuys

Second Empire

Drouyn de Lhuys Walewski Baroche Thouvenel Drouyn de Lhuys La Valette Moustier La Valette La Tour Auvergne Daru Ollivier Gramont La Tour d'Auvergne

Third Republic

Favre Rémusat A. Broglie Decazes Banneville Waddington Freycinet Barthélemy-Saint-Hilaire Gambetta Freycinet Duclerc Fallières Challemel-Lacour Ferry Freycinet Flourens Goblet Spuller Ribot Develle Casimir-Perier Hanotaux Berthelot Bourgeois Hanotaux Delcassé Rouvier Bourgeois Pichon Cruppi Selves Poincaré Jonnart Pichon Doumergue Bourgeois Viviani Doumergue Delcassé Viviani Briand Ribot Barthou Pichon Millerand Leygues Briand Poincaré Lefebvre Herriot Briand Herriot Briand Laval Tardieu Herriot Paul-Boncour Daladier Barthou Laval Flandin Delbos Paul-Boncour Bonnet Daladier Reynaud Daladier Reynaud Baudouin

Vichy France

Baudouin Laval Flandin Darlan Laval

Provisional Government

Bidault Blum

Fourth Republic

Bidault Schuman Bidault Mendès France Faure Pinay Pineau Pleven Couve de Murville

Fifth Republic

Couve de Murville Debré Schumann Bettencourt Jobert Sauvagnargues Guiringaud François-Poncet Cheysson Dumas Raimond Dumas Juppé Charette Védrine Villepin Barnier Douste-Blazy Kouchner Alliot-Marie Juppé Fabius Ayrault Le Drian

v t e

Second Fillon Cabinet

François Fillon François Baroin Alain Juppé Jean-Louis Borloo Michèle Alliot-Marie Bernard Kouchner Hervé Morin Brice Hortefeux Xavier Darcos Christine Lagarde Éric Wœrth Éric Besson Luc Chatel Bruno Le Maire Valérie Pécresse Frédéric Mitterrand Roselyne Bachelot Michel Mercier

v t e

European People's Party
European People's Party
(EPP)

Parliamentary group: European People's Party
European People's Party
Group

Parties

Member parties (EU)

ÖVP cdH CD&V GERB/ГЕРБ DSB/ДСБ DP/ДП SDS/СДС HDZ HSS DISY/ΔΗ.ΣΥ. KDU–ČSL TOP 09 K D IRL Kok./Saml. LR CDU CSU ND/Ν.Δ. Fidesz KDNP FG FI AP UdC PpI V TS-LKD CSV PN CDA PO PSL CDS PPD-PSD PNL PMP UDMR/RMDSz KDH MOST-HÍD SDKÚ-DS SMK-MKP NSi SDS SLS PP UDC KD M

Associated parties (non-EU)

VMRO - DPMNE/ВМРО - ДПМНЕ H SNS CVP-PDC-PPD-PCD

Observer parties

PD HHK/ՀՀԿ OEK/ՕԵԿ Heritage/Ժառանգություն BNF/БНФ AHP/АГП HDZ BiH PDP SDA HDZ 1990 KD ENM/ენმ LDK SVP PATT PLDM KrF PDCS VMSZ Batkivshchyna/Батьківщина NRU/НРУ UDAR/УДАР

Party Presidents

Leo Tindemans Piet Bukman Jacques Santer Wilfried Martens Joseph Daul

European Parliament Group Presidents

Maan Sassen Pierre Wigny Alain Poher Joseph Illerhaus Hans Lücker Alfred Bertrand Egon Klepsch Paolo Barbi Egon Klepsch Leo Tindemans Wilfried Martens Hans-Gert Pöttering Joseph Daul Manfred Weber see European Parliament

European Commissioners

José Manuel Barroso
José Manuel Barroso
(President) Andris Piebalgs
Andris Piebalgs
(Development) Jyrki Katainen
Jyrki Katainen
(Economic and Monetary Affairs and the Euro) Michel Barnier
Michel Barnier
(Internal Market and Services) Algirdas Šemeta
Algirdas Šemeta
(Taxation and Customs Union, Audit and Anti-Fraud) Tonio Borg
Tonio Borg
(Health and Consumer Policy) Jacek Dominik (Financial Programming and the Budget) Kristalina Georgieva
Kristalina Georgieva
(International Cooperation, Humanitarian Aid and Crisis Response) Günther Oettinger
Günther Oettinger
(Energy) Johannes Hahn
Johannes Hahn
(Regional Policy) Connie Hedegaard
Connie Hedegaard
(Climate Action) Dacian Cioloș
Dacian Cioloș
(Agriculture and Rural Development) see Barroso II Commission

Heads of government at the European Council

Nicos Anastasiades
Nicos Anastasiades
(Cyprus) Alexander Stubb
Alexander Stubb
(Finland) Angela Merkel
Angela Merkel
(Germany) Antonis Samaras
Antonis Samaras
(Greece) Viktor Orbán
Viktor Orbán
(Hungary) Enda Kenny
Enda Kenny
(Ireland) Laimdota Straujuma
Laimdota Straujuma
(Latvia) Pedro Passos Coelho
Pedro Passos Coelho
(Portugal) Traian Băsescu
Traian Băsescu
(Romania) Mariano Rajoy
Mariano Rajoy
(Spain) see European Council

Eurofoundation: Wilfried Martens
Wilfried Martens
Centre for European Studies

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 225404505 LCCN: n82044273 ISNI: 0000 0003 6213 1105 GND: 171240936 SUDOC: 028588479 BNF: cb1203

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