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The Mesoarchean (/ˌmiːzoʊɑːrˈkiːən/, also spelled Mesoarchaean) is a geologic era within the Archean
Archean
Eon, spanning 3,200 to 2,800 million years ago. The era is defined chronometrically and is not referenced to a specific level in a rock section on Earth. Fossils from Australia
Australia
show that stromatolites have lived on Earth since the Mesoarchean. The Pongola glaciation occurred around 2,900 million years ago.[1] The first supercontinent Vaalbara
Vaalbara
broke up during this era about 2,800 million years ago. The earliest reefs date from this era, and were probably formed by stromatolites.[2][3] The surface temperature during the Mesoarchean was likely not much higher than modern-day temperatures.[4] Atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration was only a few times higher than its pre-industrial value[5], and the Sun's luminosity was only 70% of its current value, cancelling out the influence of a greater degree of greenhouse effect that may be operating. See also[edit]

Geologic time scale Glacial period Ice age Last glacial period

References[edit]

^ Robert E. Kopp; Joseph L. Kirschvink; Isaac A. Hilburn & Cody Z. Nash (2005). "The Paleoproterozoic snowball Earth: A climate disaster triggered by the evolution of oxygenic photosynthesis". Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 102 (32): 11131–6. Bibcode:2005PNAS..10211131K. doi:10.1073/pnas.0504878102. PMC 1183582 . PMID 16061801.  ^ Allwood, Abigail C.; Walter, Malcolm R.; Kamber, Balz S.; Marshall, Craig P.; Burch, Ian W. (8 June 2006). " Stromatolite
Stromatolite
reef from the Early Archaean era of Australia". Nature. 441 (7094): 714–718. doi:10.1038/nature04764. Retrieved 10 March 2018.  ^ Nelson, Jon (15 April 1997). "Stromatolites: Our Mysterious Ancient Reefs". Lake Superior Magazine. Retrieved 10 March 2018.  ^ Sleep, Norman H.; Hessler, Angela M. (January 2006). "Weathering of quartz as an Archean
Archean
climatic indicator" (PDF). Earth and Planetary Science Letters. 241 (3-4): 594–602. doi:10.1016/j.epsl.2005.11.020. Retrieved 10 March 2018.  ^ Marty, Bernard; Zimmermann, Laurent; Pujol, Magali; Burgess, Ray; Philippot, Pascal (4 October 2013). "Nitrogen Isotopic Composition and Density of the Archean
Archean
Atmosphere". Science. 342 (6154): 101–104. doi:10.1126/science.1240971. ISSN 0036-8075. Retrieved 10 March 2018. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Archean.

v t e

Archean
Archean
Eon

Eoarchean Paleoarchean Mesoarchean Neoarchean

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Ice ages

Quaternary

Current

Antarctica Greenland Iceland

Pleistocene

Last glacial period 1st: Würm, Wisconsin, Weichselian, Devensian/Midlandian, Pinedale/Fraser, Greenland, Merida, Llanquihue 2nd: Riss, Illinoian, Saale, Wolstonian, Santa María 3rd–6th: Mindel, Pre-Illinoian, Elster, Anglian, Rio Llico 7th–8th: Günz, Pre-Illinoian, Elbe or Menapian, Beestonian, Caracol

Carboniferous–Permian

Karoo (360 Mya to 260 Mya)

Ordovician–Silurian

Andean-Saharan (460 Mya to 430 Mya)

Ediacaran

Gaskiers (579.63 to 579.63 Mya) Baykonurian (547 to 541.5 Mya)

Cryogenian

Sturtian (717 to 660 Mya); Marinoan (650 to 635 Mya)

Paleoproterozoic

Huronian (2.4 to 2.1 Gya)

Mesoarchean

Pongola (2.9 to 2.78 Gya)

Related topics

Greenhouse and icehouse Earth Great Oxygenation Event Snowball Earth Interglacial Milankovitch cycles Stadial

Timeline of glaciation

v t e

Geologic history of Earth

Cenozoic
Cenozoic
era¹ (present–66.0 Mya)

Quaternary
Quaternary
(present–2.588 Mya)

Holocene
Holocene
(present–11.784 kya) Pleistocene
Pleistocene
(11.784 kya–2.588 Mya)

Neogene
Neogene
(2.588–23.03 Mya)

Pliocene
Pliocene
(2.588–5.333 Mya) Miocene
Miocene
(5.333–23.03 Mya)

Paleogene (23.03–66.0 Mya)

Oligocene
Oligocene
(23.03–33.9 Mya) Eocene
Eocene
(33.9–56.0 Mya) Paleocene
Paleocene
(56.0–66.0 Mya)

Mesozoic
Mesozoic
era¹ (66.0–251.902 Mya)

Cretaceous
Cretaceous
(66.0–145.0 Mya)

Late (66.0–100.5 Mya) Early (100.5–145.0 Mya)

Jurassic
Jurassic
(145.0–201.3 Mya)

Late (145.0–163.5 Mya) Middle (163.5–174.1 Mya) Early (174.1–201.3 Mya)

Triassic
Triassic
(201.3–251.902 Mya)

Late (201.3–237 Mya) Middle (237–247.2 Mya) Early (247.2–251.902 Mya)

Paleozoic
Paleozoic
era¹ (251.902–541.0 Mya)

Permian
Permian
(251.902–298.9 Mya)

Lopingian
Lopingian
(251.902–259.8 Mya) Guadalupian
Guadalupian
(259.8–272.3 Mya) Cisuralian
Cisuralian
(272.3–298.9 Mya)

Carboniferous
Carboniferous
(298.9–358.9 Mya)

Pennsylvanian (298.9–323.2 Mya) Mississippian (323.2–358.9 Mya)

Devonian
Devonian
(358.9–419.2 Mya)

Late (358.9–382.7 Mya) Middle (382.7–393.3 Mya) Early (393.3–419.2 Mya)

Silurian
Silurian
(419.2–443.8 Mya)

Pridoli (419.2–423.0 Mya) Ludlow (423.0–427.4 Mya) Wenlock (427.4–433.4 Mya) Llandovery (433.4–443.8 Mya)

Ordovician
Ordovician
(443.8–485.4 Mya)

Late (443.8–458.4 Mya) Middle (458.4–470.0 Mya) Early (470.0–485.4 Mya)

Cambrian
Cambrian
(485.4–541.0 Mya)

Furongian (485.4–497 Mya) Series 3 (497–509 Mya) Series 2 (509–521 Mya) Terreneuvian
Terreneuvian
(521–541.0 Mya)

Proterozoic
Proterozoic
eon² (541.0 Mya–2.5 Gya)

Neoproterozoic era (541.0 Mya–1 Gya)

Ediacaran
Ediacaran
(541.0-~635 Mya) Cryogenian (~635-~720 Mya) Tonian (~720 Mya-1 Gya)

Mesoproterozoic era (1–1.6 Gya)

Stenian (1-1.2 Gya) Ectasian (1.2-1.4 Gya) Calymmian (1.4-1.6 Gya)

Paleoproterozoic era (1.6–2.5 Gya)

Statherian (1.6-1.8 Gya) Orosirian
Orosirian
(1.8-2.05 Gya) Rhyacian (2.05-2.3 Gya) Siderian
Siderian
(2.3-2.5 Gya)

Archean
Archean
eon² (2.5–4 Gya)

Eras

Neoarchean (2.5–2.8 Gya) Mesoarchean (2.8–3.2 Gya) Paleoarchean
Paleoarchean
(3.2–3.6 Gya) Eoarchean
Eoarchean
(3.6–4 Gya)

Hadean
Hadean
eon² (4–4.6 Gya)

 

 

kya = thousands years ago. Mya = millions years ago. Gya = billions years ago.¹ = Phanerozoic
Phanerozoic
eon. ² = Precambrian
Precambrian
supereon. Source: (2017/02). International Commission on Stratigraphy. Retrieved 13 July 2015. Divisions of Geologic Time—Major Chronostratigraphic and Geochronologic Units USGS Retrieved 10 March 2013.

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