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Malaysia
Malaysia
Day is held on 16 September every year to commemorate the establishment of the Malaysian federation on the same date in 1963. It marked the joining together of Malaya, North Borneo
North Borneo
and Sarawak to form Malaysia.

Contents

1 History 2 In popular cultures 3 See also 4 References

History[edit] The formation of the new federation was planned to occur on 1 June 1963, but was later postponed to 31 August 1963, to coincide with the sixth Hari Merdeka. Several issues related to objections of neighbouring Indonesia
Indonesia
and the Philippines
Philippines
to the formation of Malaysia
Malaysia
delayed the declaration to 16 September of the same year. The postponement was also done to allow the United Nations
United Nations
team time to conduct fact-finding mission in North Borneo
North Borneo
(now Sabah) and Sarawak regarding the two states participation in a new federation.[1][2] Contrary to popular beliefs, no referendum was ever conducted in both North Borneo
North Borneo
and Sarawak. The formation of Malaysia
Malaysia
was made possible with the signing of the International Treaty the Malaysia
Malaysia
Agreement 1963 between the United Kingdom, the Federation of Malaya
Federation of Malaya
(constituted by 11 states created under the Federation of Malaya
Federation of Malaya
Agreement 1957 ; as one component); Sarawak, North Borneo
North Borneo
(renamed Sabah) and Singapore of the remaining component States. The Malaysia Agreement 1963 set out the terms and conditions for the component States to be federated under a new constitution into one new nation called Malaysia. It is under this Agreement that the " Malaysia
Malaysia
Bill" , (Annexture A), the constitutions of Sarawak, Sabah
Sabah
and Singapore were created by agreement of all the parties (Singapore seceded on 9 August 1965). Through the introduction of the Malaysia
Malaysia
Bill to the Malayan Parliament on 9 July 1963, and consent from Tuanku Syed Putra, the Yang di-Pertuan Agong, on 29 August 1963.[1] Prior to the formation of Malaysia, Sarawak gained its Self-Government Administration on 22 July 1963,[3] while North Borneo
North Borneo
(which was renamed Sabah) began Self-Government Administration from the United Kingdom on 31 August 1963,[4] thus coinciding with the sixth anniversary of the Malayan independence. Prior to 2010, Malaysia
Malaysia
Day was observed as a state public holiday in Sabah
Sabah
and Sarawak. Since 2010, Malaysia
Malaysia
Day has been a nationwide public holiday.[5] Prime Minister Najib Razak
Najib Razak
made the decision after a question-and-answer session at Parliament on 19 October 2009, giving Malaysians
Malaysians
two celebrations related to the country's independence. In popular cultures[edit] Malaysia
Malaysia
Forever was a song composed by Bobby Gimby
Bobby Gimby
to celebrate the Formation of Malaysia
Malaysia
on 16 September 1963. Bobby Gimby
Bobby Gimby
received the nickname "The Pied Piper of Canada" after the Prime Minister nicked Gimby as "the Pied Piper from Canada". The song was recorded in Kuala Lumpur and Singapore. It is a folk song with a length of 2 minutes sung by the Choir of the Marymount Vocational School (Singapore). On the days before the merger, it was taught to school children prior to merger and became an instant hit when it was broadcast over the air-waves of all parts of Malaysia.[6][7] See also[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Agreement relating to Malaysia.

Wikisource
Wikisource
has original text related to this article: Selamat Hari Malaysia
Malaysia
ke-50 regarding Pulau Pinang, Melaka, Sarawak dan Sabah
Sabah
in Malay language

Merdeka Day Sarawak Day North Borneo
North Borneo
Self-government Day 20-point agreement
20-point agreement
(Sabah) 18-point agreement
18-point agreement
(Sarawak) History of Malaysia Singapore in Malaysia Malaysia
Malaysia
Forever

References[edit]

^ a b A marriage that was doomed from the start. New Straits Times. 4 August 2007. ^ Looi Sue-Chern (15 September 2014). " Sabah
Sabah
and Sarawak deserve better, says Guan Eng in Malaysia
Malaysia
Day message". The Malaysian Insider. Archived from the original on 18 September 2014. Retrieved 18 September 2014.  ^ Frans Welman. Borneo Trilogy Sarawak: Volume 2. Booksmango. pp. 134–. ISBN 978-616-245-089-1. Retrieved 31 August 2013.  ^ Frans Welman. Borneo Trilogy Volume 1: Sabah. Booksmango. pp. 159–. ISBN 978-616-245-078-5. Retrieved 31 August 2013.  ^ Yeng Ai Chun (19 October 2009). " Malaysia
Malaysia
Day now a public holiday, says PM". The Star. Retrieved 16 September 2012.  ^ " Malaysians
Malaysians
Should Reflect On Lyrics From Malaysia
Malaysia
Forever". 15 September 2015.  ^ Listen to Music on YouTube

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Malaysia articles

History

Timeline Prehistoric Portuguese Malacca Dutch Malacca British Malaya

Straits Settlements Federated Malay States Unfederated Malay States

British Borneo

Kingdom of Sarawak Crown Colony of Labuan North Borneo

Japanese occupation of Malaya
Japanese occupation of Malaya
/ Borneo British Military Administration (Malaya / Borneo) Malayan Union Federation of Malaya

Independence

Malayan Emergency Crown Colony of Singapore

Self-government

Crown Colony of Sarawak

Self-government

Crown Colony of North Borneo

Self-government

Malaysia
Malaysia
Agreement 1962 Singapore referendum Cobbold Commission

18-point agreement 20-point agreement

Indonesia– Malaysia
Malaysia
confrontation Sarawak Communist Insurgency Proclamation

Malaysia
Malaysia
Day

PAP–UMNO relations 1964 race riots Singapore in Malaysia Second Malayan Emergency 13 May Incident 1988 Malaysian constitutional crisis 1997 Asian financial crisis

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