Lugaid
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Lugaid (Lughaid, Lughaidh, Lughaí, with all equivalents originally attested as
Ogham Ogham ( , Modern Irish Irish ( in Standard Irish Standard may refer to: Symbols * Colours, standards and guidons In military organizations, the practice of carrying colours, standards or guidons, both to act as a rallying p ...

Ogham
Lugodeccus) is a popular medieval Irish name, thought to be derived from the god Lug. It is borne by a number of figures from Irish history and mythology, including:


High Kings of Ireland

* Lugaid Íardonn, legendary High King of Ireland of the 9th century BC * Lugaid Lámdearg, legendary High King of Ireland of the 9th century BC * Lugaid Laigde, legendary High King of Ireland of the 8th century BC * Lugaid Luaigne, legendary High King of Ireland of the 2nd century BC * Lugaid Riab nDerg, legendary High King of Ireland of the 1st century BC * Lugaid Mac Con, semi-legendary High King of Ireland of the 3rd century AD * Lugaid mac Lóegairi (died ''c''. 507), High King of Ireland * Lugaid Loígde, legendary King of Tara upon whom several of the above may be based


Other historical figures

* Lugaid mac Nóis, legendary king of Munster and suitor of Emer * Lugaid mac Con Roí, legendary king of Munster and killer of Cú Chulainn * Lugaid Lága, henchman of Lugaid Mac Con, regarded as one of the greatest warriors in Ireland


Saints

* Saint Moluag (died 592), also known as Saint Lughaidh, 6th-century Irish Pict missionary * Saint Molua, 6th-century Irish saint, founder of Killaloe


See also

*Dáire *List of Irish-language given names


References

* James MacKillop, ''Dictionary of Celtic Mythology''. Oxford University Press. 1998. * Eoin MacNeill, ''Celtic Ireland''. Academy Press. 1981 (reissue with new intro. and notes by Donnchadh Ó Corráin of original Martin Lester Ltd edition, 1921). * T. F. O'Rahilly, ''Early Irish History and Mythology''. Dublin Institute for Advanced Studies. 1946. {{given name Irish-language masculine given names