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The Litany of the Saints (Latin: Litaniae Sanctorum) is a formal prayer of the Roman Catholic Church as well as the Old Catholic Church, Anglo-Catholic communities, and Western Rite Orthodox communities. It is a prayer to the Triune God, which also includes invocations for the intercession of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the Angels and all the martyrs and saints upon whom Christianity was founded, and those recognised as saints through the subsequent history of the church. Following the invocation of the saints, the Litany concludes with a series of supplications to God to hear the prayers of the worshippers. It is most prominently sung during the Easter Vigil, All Saints' Day, and in the liturgy for conferring Holy Orders, the Consecration of a Virgin and reception of the perpetual vows of a religious or a diocesane hermit.

Litany of the Saints is usually sung during ordination mass when the candidates to be ordained lay prostrate

The definitive version of the Roman Catholic Litany of the Saints is a Latin text published in the Roman Gradual.[1] The current edition was published in 1974,[2] and contains a statement of approval from the Congregation for Divine Worship issued 24 June 1972. The current edition if the Roman Gradual was updated in 1979 to include Neums from Ancient Manuscripts (Roman Gradual.[1] The current edition was published in 1974,[2] and contains a statement of approval from the Congregation for Divine Worship issued 24 June 1972. The current edition if the Roman Gradual was updated in 1979 to include Neums from Ancient Manuscripts (ISBN 978-2852740440 in English (1985), ISBN 978-2-85274-094-5 in Latin).

The litany is published in five sections. The first contains a short series of invocations of God, beginning with a threefold Kyrie, followed by invocations of God the Father of Heaven, the Son who redeemed the world, the Holy Spirit, and the Holy Trinity.

The second section lists the saints who are to be included, given in the following order. Within each category, men are listed in chronological order, followed by women, also in chronological order. Distinctive names are given in brackets so the cantor knows which saint is intended,[clarification needed] but a directive notes that the bracketed names may be omitted when the Latin is sung. Additional saints, such as the patron of a place or the founder of a religious order, may be inserted in the appropriate place. The official list of recognized saints can be found in the Roman Martyrology.