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The Info List - Larry Gelbart


Larry Simon Gelbart (February 25, 1928 – September 11, 2009)[1] was an American television writer, playwright, screenwriter, director and author, most famous as a creator and producer of the television series M*A*S*H, and as co-writer of Broadway musicals City of Angels and A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum.

Contents

1 Biography

1.1 Early life 1.2 Television 1.3 Films 1.4 Broadway 1.5 Memoirs 1.6 Blogger

2 Honors

2.1 Death

3 Writing credits 4 M*A*S*H episodes

4.1 Season one (9/17/72–3/25/73) 4.2 Season two (9/15/73–3/2/74) 4.3 Season three (9/10/74–3/18/75) 4.4 Season four (9/12/75–2/24/76)

5 References 6 Bibliography 7 External links

Biography[edit] Early life[edit] Gelbart was born in Chicago, Illinois, to Jewish
Jewish
immigrants Harry Gelbart, "a barber since his half of a childhood in Latvia,"[2] and Frieda Sturner, who migrated to America from Dąbrowa Górnicza, Poland. Marcia Gelbart Walkenstein was his sister. His family later moved to Los Angeles and he attended Fairfax High School. Drafted shortly after World War Two, Gelbart worked for the Armed Forces Radio Service
Armed Forces Radio Service
in Los Angeles.[3] Television[edit] Gelbart began as a writer at the age of sixteen for Danny Thomas's radio show after his father, who was Thomas's barber, showed Thomas some jokes Gelbart had written. During the 1940s Gelbart also wrote for Jack Paar
Jack Paar
and Bob Hope. In the 1950s, his most important work in television involved writing for Red Buttons, for Sid Caesar
Sid Caesar
on Caesar's Hour, and in Celeste Holm's Honestly, Celeste!, as well as with writers Mel Tolkin, Michael Stewart, Selma Diamond, Neil Simon, Mel Brooks, Carl Reiner
Carl Reiner
and Woody Allen
Woody Allen
on two Caesar specials.[4] In 1972, Gelbart was one of the main forces behind the creation of the television series M*A*S*H, writing the pilot (for which he received a "Developed for Television
Television
by __" credit); then producing, often writing and occasionally directing the series for its first four seasons, from 1972 to 1976. M*A*S*H earned Gelbart a Peabody Award
Peabody Award
and an Emmy for Outstanding Comedy Series and went on to considerable commercial and critical success. Films[edit] Gelbart's best known screen work is perhaps the screenplay for 1982's Tootsie, which he co-wrote with Murray Schisgal. He was nominated for an Academy Award for that script, and also was Oscar-nominated for his adapted screenplay for 1977's Oh, God!
Oh, God!
starring John Denver
John Denver
and George Burns. On his relationship with actor Dustin Hoffman in Tootsie, Gelbart is reported to have said, "Never get involved in a film where the Oscar-winning star is smaller than the statuette." He later retracted this statement, saying that it was just a joke. He collaborated with Burt Shevelove on the screenplay for the 1966 British film The Wrong Box. Gelbart also co-wrote the golden-era film spoof Movie Movie
Movie Movie
(1978) starring George C. Scott
George C. Scott
in dual roles, the racy comedy Blame It on Rio (1984) starring Michael Caine
Michael Caine
and the 2000 remake of Bedazzled with Elizabeth Hurley
Elizabeth Hurley
and Brendan Fraser. His script for Rough Cut (1980), a caper film starring Burt Reynolds, Lesley-Anne Down
Lesley-Anne Down
and David Niven, was credited under the pseudonym Francis Burns. Gelbart-scripted films for television included Barbarians at the Gate (1993), a true story about the battle for control of the RJR Nabisco corporation starring James Garner
James Garner
that was based on the best-selling book of that name; the original comedy Weapons of Mass Distraction (1997) starring Ben Kingsley
Ben Kingsley
and Gabriel Byrne
Gabriel Byrne
as rival media moguls; and And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself (2003) starring Antonio Banderas as the Mexican revolutionary leader. Broadway[edit] Gelbart co-wrote the long-running Broadway musical farce A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum with Burt Shevelove and Stephen Sondheim in 1962. After the show received poor reviews and box-office returns during its previews in Washington, D.C., rewrites and restaging helped; it was a smash Broadway hit and ran for 964 performances. Its book won a Tony Award. A film version starring Zero Mostel and directed by Richard Lester, was released in 1966. Gelbart was critical of the movie, as most of his and Shevelove's libretto was largely rewritten. Gelbart's other Broadway credits include the musical City of Angels, which won him the Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Book of a Musical and an Edgar Award. He also wrote the Iran-contra satire Mastergate, as well as Sly Fox and a musical adaptation of the Preston Sturges movie Hail the Conquering Hero, whose grueling development inspired Gelbart to utter what evolved into the classic quip, "If Hitler is alive, I hope he's out of town with a musical."[5] Memoirs[edit] In 1997, Gelbart published his memoir, Laughing Matters: On Writing M*A*S*H, Tootsie, Oh, God!
Oh, God!
and a Few Other Funny Things.[2] Blogger[edit] Gelbart was a contributing blogger at The Huffington Post, and also was a regular participant on the alt.tv.mash Usenet
Usenet
newsgroup as "Elsig". Honors[edit] In 1995, a Golden Palm Star on the Palm Springs, California, Walk of Stars was dedicated to him.[6] He won an Emmy Award
Emmy Award
for Outstanding Comedy Series in 1974 for M*A*S*H. In 2002, Gelbart was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame.[7] In 2008, he was inducted into the Television
Television
Hall of Fame.[8] Death[edit] Gelbart was diagnosed with cancer in June and died at his Beverly Hills home on September 11, 2009. His wife of 53 years, Pat Gelbart, said that after being married for so long, "we finished each other's sentences." She declined to specify the type of cancer he had.[1][9] He was buried at the Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery
Hillside Memorial Park Cemetery
in Culver City, California.[10] Writing credits[edit]

Duffy's Tavern
Duffy's Tavern
(1941–1951) (Radio) The Red Buttons
Red Buttons
Show (1952) (TV) Honestly, Celeste!
Honestly, Celeste!
(1954) (TV) Caesar's Hour
Caesar's Hour
(1954–1957) (TV) The Patrice Munsel Show
The Patrice Munsel Show
(1957) (TV) The Dinah Shore Chevy Show
The Dinah Shore Chevy Show
(1958) (TV) The Art Carney Show (1959) (TV) Startime
Startime
(1959) (TV) The Best of Anything (1960) (TV) Hooray for Love (1960) (TV) A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum
(with Burt Shevelove) (1962) (Theater) The Notorious Landlady
The Notorious Landlady
(with Blake Edwards) (1962) Judy and her guests, Phil Silvers and Robert Goulet (1963) (TV) The Thrill of It All (1963) (story only) The Danny Kaye Show
The Danny Kaye Show
(1963) (TV) The Wrong Box
The Wrong Box
(with Burt Shevelove) (1966) Not with My Wife, You Don't!
Not with My Wife, You Don't!
(with Norman Panama and Peter Barnes) (1966) A Fine Pair
A Fine Pair
(1967) (uncredited) Eddie (1971) (TV) The Marty Feldman Comedy Machine
The Marty Feldman Comedy Machine
(1971) (TV) Roll Out (1972) (TV) M*A*S*H (1972–1983) (TV) (also Co-Creator, with Gene Reynolds) If I Love You, Am I Trapped Forever? (1974) (TV) Karen (1975) (TV) Sly Fox (1976) (Theater) Three's Company
Three's Company
(1976) (TV) (unaired pilot) Oh God!
Oh God!
(1977) Movie Movie
Movie Movie
(1978) United States (1980) (TV) Rough Cut (1980) (as Francis Burns) Neighbors (1981) Tootsie
Tootsie
(with Murray Schisgal) (1982) AfterMASH
AfterMASH
(1983–1984) (TV) (also Creator) Blame it on Rio (1984) City of Angels (1989) (Theater) Mastergate (1990) (Theater) Barbarians at the Gate
Barbarians at the Gate
(1993) (TV) Weapons of Mass Distraction (1997) (TV) Laughing Matters: On writing M*A*S*H, Tootsie, Oh, God!
Oh, God!
And A Few Other Funny Things (1999) (Autobiography) C-Scam (2000) (TV) Bedazzled (with Harold Ramis
Harold Ramis
and Peter Tolan) (2000) And Starring Pancho Villa as Himself (2003) (TV)

M*A*S*H episodes[edit] The following is a list of M*A*S*H episodes (42 Total) written and/or directed by Gelbart. Season one (9/17/72–3/25/73)[edit]

Episode 1: The Pilot (Written) Episode 4: "Chief Surgeon Who?" (Written) Episode 11: "Germ Warfare" (Written) Episode 12: "Dear Dad" (Written) Episode 18: "Dear Dad...Again" (Written with Sheldon Keller) Episode 21: "Sticky Wicket" (Teleplay with Laurence Marks) Episode 23: "Ceasefire" (Teleplay with Laurence Marks) Episode 24: "Showtime" (Teleplay with Robert Klane; Story)

Season two (9/15/73–3/2/74)[edit]

Episode 1: "Divided We Stand" (Written) Episode 2: "Five O'Clock Charlie" (Written with Laurence Marks & Keith Walker) Episode 6: "Kim" (Written with Marc Mandel & Laurence Marks) Episode 7: "L.I.P. (Local Indigenous Personnel)" (Written with Carl Kleinschmitt & Laurence Marks) Episode 9: "Dear Dad...Three" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 11: "Carry On, Hawkeye" (Written with Bernard Dilbert & Laurence Marks) Episode 12: "The Incubator" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 13: "Deal Me Out" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 16: "Henry in Love" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 19: "The Chosen People" (Written Laurence Marks & Sheldon Keller) Episode 20: "As You Were" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 21: "Crisis" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 23: "Mail Call" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 24: "A Smattering of Intelligence" (Written with Laurence Marks; Directed)

Season three (9/10/74–3/18/75)[edit]

Episode 1: "The General Flipped at Dawn" (Directed) Episode 2: "Rainbow Bridge" (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 4: "Iron Guts Kelly" (Written with Sid Dorfman) Episode 5: "O.R." (Written with Laurence Marks) Episode 10: "There's Nothing Like a Nurse" (Written) Episode 16: "Bulletin Board" (Written with Simon Muntner) Episode 17: "The Consultant" (Story) Episode 19: "Aid Station" (Written with Simon Muntner) Episode 23: "White Gold" (Written with Simon Muntner) Episode 24: "Abyssinia, Henry" (Directed)

Season four (9/12/75–2/24/76)[edit]

Episode 1: "Welcome to Korea" (Written with Everett Greenbaum & Jim Fritzell) Episode 3: "It Happened One Night" (Teleplay with Simon Muntner) Episode 9: "Quo Vadis, Captain Chandler?" (Directed) Episode 13: "The Gun" (Written with Gene Reynolds) Episode 15: "The Price of Tomato Juice" (Written with Gene Reynolds) Episode 18: "Hawkeye" (Written with Simon Muntner; Directed) Episode 21: "Smilin' Jack" (Written with Simon Muntner) Episode 22: "The More I See You" (Written with Gene Reynolds) Episode 23: "Deluge" (Written with Simon Muntner) Episode 24: "The Interview" (Written and Directed)

References[edit]

^ a b McLellan, Dennis (2009-09-11). "'MASH' writer Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
dies at 81". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved 2009-09-11.  ^ a b Gelbart, Larry (1998). Laughing Matters: On Writing MASH, Tootsie, Oh, God!, and a Few Other Funny Things. New York: Random House. ISBN 0-679-42945-X.  ^ " Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
dies at 81; 'MASH' writer - Los Angeles Times". Latimes.com. 1928-02-25. Retrieved 2014-07-04.  ^ Malarcher, Jay (2003). The Classically American Comedy of Larry Gelbart. Lanham, Md.: The Scarecrow Press. ISBN 0-8108-4772-8. ^ See e.g. Barthel, Joan (February 25, 1968). "Life for Simon—-Not That Simple". The New York Times. p. D9. , cited in Popik, Barry (September 11, 2009). "If Hitler's still alive, I hope he's out of town with a musical (Larry Gelbart)". The Big Apple. Retrieved March 8, 2016. . According to Martin Gottfried, when producer Robert Whitehead tried to divert Gelbart by musing about how the ongoing war crimes trial of Adolf Eichmann
Adolf Eichmann
might turn out, Gelbart shot back, "They ought to send him out of town with a musical." Gottfried, Martin (2003). All His Jazz: The Life and Death of Bob Fosse (2nd ed.). New York: Da Capo. p. 128. ISBN 978-0-306-81284-2.  ^ "Palm Springs Walk of Stars : Listed by Date Dedicated" (PDF). Palmspringswalkofstars.com. Archived from the original (PDF) on 2012-10-13. Retrieved 2014-07-04.  ^ "32nd Annual Theatre Hall of Fame Inductees Announced; Mamet, Channing, Grimes Among Names – Playbill.com". 209.183.229.132. Archived from the original on 2014-02-23. Retrieved 2014-07-04.  ^ " Television
Television
Hall of Fame Honorees: Complete List". Emmys.com. Retrieved 2014-07-04.  ^ "'M-A-S-H' writer Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
dies at 81". Associated Press. Retrieved 2009-09-11.  ^ Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
at Find a Grave

Bibliography[edit]

Isenberg, Barbara. State of the Arts: California Artists Talk
Talk
About Their Work. 2005

External links[edit]

Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
at the Internet Broadway Database
Internet Broadway Database
Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
on IMDb Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
– Daily Telegraph obituary Abrogate – Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
play, online @ BBC Radio
Radio
4 Old Time Radio
Radio
Researchers Database of People and Programs Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
Archive of American Television
Television
Interview Nonstop Laughs Larry Gelbart, TIME Magazine

v t e

Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Author

Arthur Miller
Arthur Miller
(1947) Thomas Heggen and Joshua Logan (1948) Arthur Miller
Arthur Miller
/ Bella and Samuel Spewack
Bella and Samuel Spewack
(1949) Abe Burrows, Jack Weinstock, and Willie Gilbert (1962) Burt Shevelove and Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1963) Michael Stewart (1964) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
/ Joseph Stein (1965)

v t e

Tony Award
Tony Award
for Best Book of a Musical

1950–1975

South Pacific by Oscar Hammerstein II
Oscar Hammerstein II
and Joshua Logan (1950) Hello, Dolly! by Michael Stewart (1964) Fiddler on the Roof
Fiddler on the Roof
by Joseph Stein (1965) Company by George Furth (1971) Two Gentlemen of Verona by John Guare
John Guare
and Mel Shapiro (1972) A Little Night Music
A Little Night Music
by Hugh Wheeler (1973) Candide by Hugh Wheeler (1974) Shenandoah by James Lee Barrett, Peter Udell and Philip Rose (1975)

1976–2000

A Chorus Line
A Chorus Line
by James Kirkwood Jr. and Nicholas Dante (1976) Annie by Thomas Meehan (1977) On the Twentieth Century by Betty Comden
Betty Comden
and Adolph Green
Adolph Green
(1978) Sweeney Todd
Sweeney Todd
by Hugh Wheeler (1979) Evita by Tim Rice
Tim Rice
(1980) Woman of the Year by Peter Stone (1981) Dreamgirls by Tom Eyen (1982) Cats by T. S. Eliot
T. S. Eliot
(1983) La Cage aux Folles by Harvey Fierstein
Harvey Fierstein
(1984) Big River by William Hauptman (1985) Drood
Drood
by Rupert Holmes (1986) Les Misérables by Alain Boublil and Claude-Michel Schönberg (1987) Into the Woods
Into the Woods
by James Lapine
James Lapine
(1988) No Award (1989) City of Angels by Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1990) The Secret Garden by Marsha Norman
Marsha Norman
(1991) Falsettos by William Finn
William Finn
and James Lapine
James Lapine
(1992) Kiss of the Spider Woman by Terrence McNally
Terrence McNally
(1993) Passion by James Lapine
James Lapine
(1994) Sunset Boulevard by Don Black and Christopher Hampton
Christopher Hampton
(1995) Rent by Jonathan Larson (1996) Titanic by Peter Stone (1997) Ragtime by Terrence McNally
Terrence McNally
(1998) Parade by Alfred Uhry
Alfred Uhry
(1999) James Joyce's The Dead
James Joyce's The Dead
by Richard Nelson (2000)

2001–present

The Producers by Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
and Thomas Meehan (2001) Urinetown
Urinetown
by Greg Kotis (2002) Hairspray by Thomas Meehan and Mark O'Donnell
Mark O'Donnell
(2003) Avenue Q
Avenue Q
by Jeff Whitty (2004) The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
The 25th Annual Putnam County Spelling Bee
by Rachel Sheinkin (2005) The Drowsy Chaperone
The Drowsy Chaperone
by Bob Martin and Don McKellar
Don McKellar
(2006) Spring Awakening by Steven Sater (2007) Passing Strange by Stew (2008) Billy Elliot the Musical
Billy Elliot the Musical
by Lee Hall (2009) Memphis by Joe DiPietro (2010) The Book of Mormon by Trey Parker, Robert Lopez
Robert Lopez
and Matt Stone
Matt Stone
(2011) Once by Enda Walsh
Enda Walsh
(2012) Matilda the Musical
Matilda the Musical
by Dennis Kelly (2013) A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder
A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder
by Robert L. Freedman (2014) Fun Home by Lisa Kron (2015) Hamilton by Lin-Manuel Miranda
Lin-Manuel Miranda
(2016) Dear Evan Hansen
Dear Evan Hansen
by Steven Levenson (2017)

v t e

Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Book of a Musical

George Furth (1970) Burt Shevelove (1971) John Guare
John Guare
and Mel Shapiro (1972) Hugh Wheeler (1973) Hugh Wheeler (1974) James Kirkwood and Nicholas Dante (1976) Thomas Meehan (1977) Hugh Wheeler (1979) James Lapine
James Lapine
(1984) Jerry Colker (1985) Rupert Holmes (1986) L. Arthur Rose, Douglas Furber, Stephen Fry
Stephen Fry
and Mike Ockrent
Mike Ockrent
(1987) James Lapine
James Lapine
(1988) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1990) Marsha Norman
Marsha Norman
(1991) George C. Wolfe
George C. Wolfe
(1992) James Lapine
James Lapine
(1994) Jonathan Larson (1996) Terrence McNally
Terrence McNally
(1998) Alfred Uhry
Alfred Uhry
(1999) Mel Brooks
Mel Brooks
and Thomas Meehan (2001) John Lahr and Elaine Stritch
Elaine Stritch
(2002) Mark O'Donnell
Mark O'Donnell
and Thomas Meehan (2003) Winnie Holzman (2004) Rachel Sheinkin (2005) Bob Martin and Don McKellar
Don McKellar
(2006) Rupert Holmes and Peter Stone (2007) Douglas Carter Beane (2008) Lee Hall (2009) Alex Timbers (2010) Adam Mathias (2011) Joe DiPietro (2012) Dennis Kelly (2013) Robert L. Freedman (2014) Lin-Manuel Miranda
Lin-Manuel Miranda
(2015) John Caird (2016) Irene Sankoff and David Hein (2017)

v t e

National Society of Film Critics Award for Best Screenplay

1967–2000

David Newman and Robert Benton (1967) John Cassavetes
John Cassavetes
(1968) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Éric Rohmer
Éric Rohmer
(1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1972) George Lucas, Gloria Katz and Willard Huyck (1973) Ingmar Bergman
Ingmar Bergman
(1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Alain Tanner
Alain Tanner
and John Berger
John Berger
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
(1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) John Guare
John Guare
(1981) Murray Schisgal and Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1982) Bill Forsyth
Bill Forsyth
(1983) Lowell Ganz, Babaloo Mandel and Bruce Jay Friedman (1984) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1985) Hanif Kureishi
Hanif Kureishi
(1986) John Boorman
John Boorman
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Gus Van Sant
Gus Van Sant
and Daniel Yost (1989) Charles Burnett (1990) David Cronenberg
David Cronenberg
(1991) David Webb Peoples (1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Quentin Tarantino
Quentin Tarantino
and Roger Avary
Roger Avary
(1994) Amy Heckerling (1995) Albert Brooks
Albert Brooks
and Monica Johnson (1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Scott Frank (1998) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000)

2001–present

Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Ronald Harwood (2002) Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Noah Baumbach
Noah Baumbach
(2005) Peter Morgan (2006) Tamara Jenkins
Tamara Jenkins
(2007) Mike Leigh
Mike Leigh
(2008) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Asghar Farhadi
Asghar Farhadi
(2011) Tony Kushner
Tony Kushner
(2012) Richard Linklater, Ethan Hawke, and Julie Delpy
Julie Delpy
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
(2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2016) Greta Gerwig
Greta Gerwig
(2017)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Best Original Screenplay

Original Drama (1969–1983, retired)

William Goldman
William Goldman
(1969) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Edmund H. North (1970) Penelope Gilliatt (1971) Jeremy Larner (1972) Steve Shagan (1973) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
(1974) Frank Pierson
Frank Pierson
(1975) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1976) Arthur Laurents
Arthur Laurents
(1977) Nancy Dowd, Robert C. Jones and Waldo Salt (1978) Mike Gray, T. S. Cook and James Bridges (1979) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
(1980) Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
and Trevor Griffiths (1981) Melissa Mathison
Melissa Mathison
(1982) Horton Foote (1983)

Original Comedy (1969–1983, retired)

Paul Mazursky
Paul Mazursky
and Larry Tucker (1969) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1970) Paddy Chayefsky
Paddy Chayefsky
(1971) Peter Bogdanovich, Buck Henry, David Newman and Robert Benton (1972) Melvin Frank and Jack Rose (1973) Mel Brooks, Norman Steinberg, Andrew Bergman, Richard Pryor
Richard Pryor
and Alan Uger (1974) Robert Towne
Robert Towne
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
(1975) Bill Lancaster
Bill Lancaster
(1976) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
and Marshall Brickman (1977) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Sheldon Keller (1978) Steve Tesich
Steve Tesich
(1979) Nancy Meyers, Harvey Miller and Charles Shyer
Charles Shyer
(1980) Steve Gordon (1981) Don McGuire, Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
and Murray Schisgal (1982) Lawrence Kasdan
Lawrence Kasdan
and Barbara Benedek (1983)

Original Screenplay (1984–present)

Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1984) William Kelley and Earl W. Wallace (1985) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1986) John Patrick Shanley
John Patrick Shanley
(1987) Ron Shelton (1988) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(1989) Barry Levinson
Barry Levinson
(1990) Callie Khouri
Callie Khouri
(1991) Neil Jordan
Neil Jordan
(1992) Jane Campion
Jane Campion
(1993) Richard Curtis
Richard Curtis
(1994) Randall Wallace (1995) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (1996) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
and Mark Andrus (1997) Marc Norman and Tom Stoppard
Tom Stoppard
(1998) Alan Ball (1999) Kenneth Lonergan
Kenneth Lonergan
(2000) Julian Fellowes
Julian Fellowes
(2001) Michael Moore
Michael Moore
(2002) Sofia Coppola
Sofia Coppola
(2003) Charlie Kaufman
Charlie Kaufman
(2004) Paul Haggis
Paul Haggis
and Bobby Moresco (2005) Michael Arndt
Michael Arndt
(2006) Diablo Cody
Diablo Cody
(2007) Dustin Lance Black
Dustin Lance Black
(2008) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2009) Christopher Nolan
Christopher Nolan
(2010) Woody Allen
Woody Allen
(2011) Mark Boal
Mark Boal
(2012) Spike Jonze
Spike Jonze
(2013) Wes Anderson
Wes Anderson
and Hugo Guinness (2014) Tom McCarthy and Josh Singer (2015) Barry Jenkins
Barry Jenkins
and Tarell Alvin McCraney
Tarell Alvin McCraney
(2016) Jordan Peele
Jordan Peele
(2017)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Best Adapted Screenplay

Adapted Drama (1969–1983, retired)

Waldo Salt (1969) Robert Anderson (1970) Ernest Tidyman (1971) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1972) Waldo Salt and Norman Wexler (1973) Francis Ford Coppola
Francis Ford Coppola
and Mario Puzo
Mario Puzo
(1974) Bo Goldman
Bo Goldman
and Lawrence Hauben (1975) William Goldman
William Goldman
(1976) Denne Bart Petitclerc
Denne Bart Petitclerc
(1977) Oliver Stone
Oliver Stone
(1978) Robert Benton (1979) Alvin Sargent (1980) Ernest Thompson
Ernest Thompson
(1981) Costa-Gavras
Costa-Gavras
and Donald E. Stewart (1982) Julius J. Epstein (1983)

Adapted Comedy (1969–1983, retired)

Arnold Schulman (1969) Ring Lardner Jr.
Ring Lardner Jr.
(1970) John Paxton (1971) Jay Presson Allen
Jay Presson Allen
(1972) Alvin Sargent (1973) Lionel Chetwynd and Mordecai Richler
Mordecai Richler
(1974) Neil Simon
Neil Simon
(1975) Blake Edwards
Blake Edwards
and Frank Waldman (1976) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
(1977) Elaine May
Elaine May
and Warren Beatty
Warren Beatty
/ Bernard Slade (1978) Jerzy Kosiński
Jerzy Kosiński
(1979) Jim Abrahams, David Zucker, and Jerry Zucker
Jerry Zucker
(1980) Gerard Ayres (1981) Blake Edwards
Blake Edwards
(1982) James L. Brooks
James L. Brooks
(1983)

Adapted Screenplay (1984–present)

Bruce Robinson
Bruce Robinson
(1984) Richard Condon and Janet Roach (1985) Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
Ruth Prawer Jhabvala
(1986) Steve Martin
Steve Martin
(1987) Christopher Hampton
Christopher Hampton
(1988) Alfred Uhry
Alfred Uhry
(1989) Michael Blake (1990) Ted Tally (1991) Michael Tolkin
Michael Tolkin
(1992) Steven Zaillian (1993) Eric Roth (1994) Emma Thompson
Emma Thompson
(1995) Billy Bob Thornton
Billy Bob Thornton
(1996) Curtis Hanson
Curtis Hanson
and Brian Helgeland (1997) Scott Frank (1998) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (1999) Stephen Gaghan
Stephen Gaghan
(2000) Akiva Goldsman
Akiva Goldsman
(2001) David Hare (2002) Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
Shari Springer Berman and Robert Pulcini
(2003) Alexander Payne
Alexander Payne
and Jim Taylor (2004) Larry McMurtry
Larry McMurtry
and Diana Ossana (2005) William Monahan
William Monahan
(2006) Joel Coen and Ethan Coen (2007) Simon Beaufoy (2008) Jason Reitman
Jason Reitman
and Sheldon Turner (2009) Aaron Sorkin
Aaron Sorkin
(2010) Alexander Payne, Jim Rash, and Nat Faxon
Nat Faxon
(2011) Chris Terrio (2012) Billy Ray (2013) Graham Moore (2014) Adam McKay
Adam McKay
and Charles Randolph (2015) Eric Heisserer (2016) James Ivory
James Ivory
(2017)

v t e

Writers Guild of America Award for Television: Episodic Comedy (1970–1979)

Richard DeRoy for "The Valediction" (1970) Martin Cohan for "Thoroughly Unmilitant Mary" (1971) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
for "Chief Surgeon Who?" (1972) Robert Schiller & Robert Weiskopf for "Walter's Problem" (1973) Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
& Laurence Marks for "O.R." (1974) James Fritzell & Larry Gelbart
Larry Gelbart
& Everett Greenbaum for "Welcome to Korea" (1975) Alan Alda
Alan Alda
for "Dear Sigmund" (1976) Larry Rhine & Mel Tolkin for "Archie Gets the Business" (1977) Gary David Goldberg for "Baby, It's Cold Outside" (1978) Thad Mumford & Dan Wilcox for "Are You Now, Margaret?" / Ken Estin for "The Reluctant Fighter" (1979)

Complete list 1960s 1970s 1980s 1990s 2000s 2010s

v t e

Television
Television
Hall of Fame Class of 2008

Bea Arthur Daniel Burke Larry Gelbart Merv Griffin Thomas Murphy Sherwood Schwartz

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 37101811 LCCN: n84149841 ISNI: 0000 0001 1874 9712 GND: 128686928 SUDOC: 032006632 BNF: cb13894372g (data) BIBSYS: 98017860 MusicBrainz: 2794068e-c344-4573-a02a-7badaf877ef9 BNE: XX1320425 SN