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The Info List - Koji Uehara





NPB

1999 Central League Rookie of the Year 2x NPB wins champion (1999, 2002) 2x NPB ERA champion (1999, 2004) 2x NPB strikeout champion (1999, 2003) 2x NPB MVP for Pitcher
Pitcher
(1999, 2002) 2x Eiji Sawamura Award
Eiji Sawamura Award
(1999, 2002) 2x NPB Best Nine Award (1999, 2002) 2x Golden Glove (1999, 2003) 2x Japan
Japan
Series champion (2000, 2002) 2x Speedup Award (1999, 2004) 8x NPB All-Star selection (1999–2005, 2007)

MLB

All-Star (2014) World Series
World Series
champion (2013) ALCS MVP
ALCS MVP
(2013)

World Baseball
Baseball
Classic

World Baseball Classic
World Baseball Classic
champion 2006

Medals

Men's baseball

Representing  Japan

Olympic Games

2004 Athens Team competition

World Baseball
Baseball
Classic

2006 San Diego Team competition

In this Japanese name, the family name is Uehara. Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
(上原 浩治, Uehara Kōji, [ɯehara koːdʑi]; born April 3, 1975) is a Japanese professional baseball pitcher for the Yomiuri Giants
Yomiuri Giants
of Nippon Professional Baseball
Baseball
(NPB). He played for the Yomiuri Giants
Yomiuri Giants
of NPB from 1999 to 2008, before leaving Japan
Japan
to play in Major League Baseball
Baseball
(MLB) for the Baltimore Orioles, Texas Rangers, Boston
Boston
Red Sox, and Chicago Cubs. In 2018, he returned to Nippon Professional Baseball. A right-handed pitcher, Uehara has a solid MLB career strikeout rate, with 10.73 K/9 and walk rate of 1.36 BB/9 (through the 2016 season). Through the 2016 season, his career 7.91 K/BB is the best in MLB history for a player with at least 100 innings pitched.[1] Uehara won the 2013 ALCS
2013 ALCS
MVP Award, and closed the final game of the 2013 World Series. With his World Series
World Series
win, Uehara became one of four players in history to have won both a World Series
World Series
and a World Baseball Classic.

Contents

1 Career

1.1 Amateur career 1.2 Yomiuri Giants 1.3 Baltimore Orioles 1.4 Texas Rangers 1.5 Boston
Boston
Red Sox 1.6 Chicago Cubs 1.7 Second stint with Yomiuri Giants

2 Personal 3 References 4 External links

Career[edit] Amateur career[edit]

Uehara with the Yomiuri Giants
Yomiuri Giants
in 2006

Uehara graduated from the Osaka University of Health and Sport Sciences. In 1998, Uehara rejected a contract worth $3 million from the then- Anaheim Angels
Anaheim Angels
and signed with Yomiuri. The Angels had expressed their continued interest in Uehara, as scouting director Eddie Bane had stated that acquiring either Uehara or Daisuke Matsuzaka was a top priority for the team. However, many other teams, including the Yankees, Dodgers, Red Sox, Mets, and Orioles had shown interest in bidding for Uehara if and when he were to become available. Yomiuri Giants[edit] He was drafted with the first pick by the Yomiuri Giants
Yomiuri Giants
in 1998. In 1999, he had a successful rookie year with 15 consecutive wins that broke the all-time rookie record, claimed the Rookie of the Year, Eiji Sawamura Award, and led in wins, ERA, strikeouts and winning percentage. In 2001, he finished with a 4.02 ERA, the highest of his career. In 2002, he rebounded, leading the Central League in wins and collected his second Sawamura Award. After the 2002 season, he represented Japan
Japan
in the Major League Baseball
Baseball
Japan
Japan
All-Star Series and on November 11 became the first pitcher in over a year to strike out Barry Bonds
Barry Bonds
three consecutive times in one game. This achievement raised his profile in American Major League Baseball. He was injured before the 2007 season which made him a late appearance, and in that season, he became a closer instead, recorded a 1.74 ERA with 4 wins, 3 losses and 32 saves. Though showing a good ability both starting and closing, he returned as a starting pitcher in the 2008 season. He left the Giants after that season becoming a free agent and allowing him to play in Major League Baseball. Uehara is renowned for his performance in international competition. He participated in international events since he was in University, he also participated in Olympic Games
Olympic Games
twice, as well as the first World Baseball
Baseball
Classic, and participated in Asian Baseball
Baseball
Championships. He has 12 wins and 2 saves, without a loss in his 25 appearances from the above events. He was a member of the Japanese national baseball team which competed in the 2004 Olympic Games
Olympic Games
in Athens. The team eventually won the bronze medal. In 2006, he joined Team Japan
Japan
for the World Baseball Classic
World Baseball Classic
and earned 2 wins, improving his unbeaten record in international competition (including amateur appearances) to 12 wins in 21 appearances. In the World Baseball
Baseball
Classic, Japan
Japan
beat Cuba to win the championship; Uehara led the tournament with 16 strikeouts. He was a closer in 2007 Asian Baseball
Baseball
Championships, played in two games and earned his first international save against Korea. Uehara moved to another team in April 2008. He remained in the 39-out-of-77 men candidate list towards the Beijing Olympics in late June, and was selected to the final 24-men list in mid-July. He was expected to be a setup pitcher before the Olympic Games, but he appeared as a closer in his first appearance against Chinese Taipei, pitching a shutout inning without yielding a hit, as his team won 6–1. He earned his first Olympic save against Canada, holding a 1–0 victory two days later. Japan
Japan
finished fourth in the Games. Uehara chose not to participate in the World Baseball Classic
World Baseball Classic
in 2009. Uehara asserted his preference in public to be transferred to a Major League Baseball
Baseball
team through the posting system. His efforts had been rebuffed by the Yomiuri Giants
Yomiuri Giants
front office. He was expected to be eligible for free agency in 2007 (but that was postponed to 2008 due to injury). He became eligible for free agency in April 2008.[2] Baltimore Orioles[edit]

Uehara during his tenure with the Baltimore Orioles
Baltimore Orioles
in 2011

On January 13, 2009, Uehara signed a two-year, $10 million deal with the Baltimore Orioles. He started the 2009 season as the number two starter behind Jeremy Guthrie.[3] Uehara made his big league debut on April 8 against the New York Yankees. Uehara earned the win, going five innings and allowing one run. His second outing resulted in a win against the Texas Rangers. On September 10, 2009, it was announced that Uehara would be out for the remainder of the season. He would finish his injury plagued 2009 campaign with a 2-4 record, 4.05 ERA, and 48 strikeouts in 66 2/3 innings in 12 starts. He started the 2010 season as a setup reliever in the bullpen and finished the season 1–2 with a 2.86 ERA, 55 strikeouts in 44 innings, and 13 saves. In the first half of the 2011 season, he was 1–1 with a 1.72 ERA and 62 strikeouts in 47 innings pitched. Texas Rangers[edit]

Uehara pitching for the Texas Rangers in 2012

On July 30, 2011, Uehara was traded to the Texas Rangers for Chris Davis and Tommy Hunter. The move re-united him with his old high school teammate Yoshinori Tateyama.[4] After starting the season with superb numbers with the Orioles, his 2nd half with the Rangers would prove to be a rough one. He was 1-2 with a 4.00 ERA after the trade. Matters would get worse in the postseason when he gave up 3 home runs in 1 1/3 innings to rack up a horrendous 33.75 ERA before being left off the roster for the World Series
World Series
due to his massive ineffectiveness. He would finish 2011 with a 2-3 record, 2.35 ERA, and 85 strikeouts in 65 innings after pitching for the 2 different teams.[5] In 2012, Uehara remained with the Rangers after his option vested. He would rebound with a successful campaign by keeping his ERA down to 1.75. However, he was limited to 37 games with 36 innings pitched, 43 strikeouts, and only 3 walks after spending some time on the disabled list due to a strained lateral muscle. Boston
Boston
Red Sox[edit] On December 6, 2012, Uehara agreed to a one-year contract with the Boston
Boston
Red Sox.[6] Uehara transitioned his role from setup man to closer after season-ending injuries to Andrew Bailey and Joel Hanrahan.[7] Uehara's 2013 season was one of the most dominant by any relief pitcher in baseball history. His 2013 WHIP of 0.57 in 74.1 innings set the record for a pitcher with 50 or more innings pitched. Between July 9 and September 17, Uehara retired 37 consecutive batters, exceeding the previous franchise record of 32, and nearing Bobby Jenks' MLB record of 41 for consecutive outs by a reliever.[8][9] Uehara finished the regular season with a 1.09 ERA, a 2.08 xFIP, and struck out 38.1% of batters he faced. He was ranked by Fangraphs as the number one reliever of 2013 in Wins Above Replacement.[10] Uehara pitched in five games of the 2013 ALCS, and was named ALCS Most Valuable Player.[11] In the series he pitched 5.1 innings, allowing 4 hits and no walks; and collected 9 strikeouts. He recorded a save in Game 6 to win the Red Sox their 13th AL pennant. In Game 4 of the World Series, Uehara picked off St. Louis Cardinals pinch runner Kolten Wong
Kolten Wong
for the last out of a 4–2 Red Sox win. In Game 5, he recorded his seventh save of the postseason, tying the record for most saves in a single postseason. (The next year Greg Holland matched his record for saves in the playoffs, tying John Wetteland, Robb Nen, Troy Percival, and Brad Lidge.)[12] Uehara threw the winning pitch in the series, closing out the 6–1 win over the Cardinals in Game 6 at Fenway Park, Boston. During Boston's post-win celebrations on the field, David Ortiz
David Ortiz
playfully lifted Uehara over his shoulder after games five and six.[13] On July 9, 2014, Uehara was named to his first career All Star Game, replacing injured New York Yankees
New York Yankees
pitcher Masahiro Tanaka. He struggled near the end of the 2014 regular season and was removed from the closer role on September 5.[14] He signed a two-year extension with the Red Sox on October 30, 2014 after finishing the regular season with a 6–5 record, 2.52 ERA, 80 strikeouts in 64 1/3 innings, and 26 saves in 31 opportunities as the Red Sox failed to defend its title by finishing with a subpar 71-91 record.[15] Uehara returned to the closer position in the 2015 season, but on August 7, he suffered a season-ending injury when a batted ball struck his right wrist. He would prematurely end his 2015 campaign with a 2–4 record added by a 2.23 ERA, 47 strikeouts in 40 1/3 innings, and 25 saves in 27 attempts as the Red Sox failed to reach the .500 mark for the 2nd season in a row.[16] In 2016, Uehara finished the regular season with a 2–3 record, a 3.45 ERA, 63 strikeouts in 47 innings, and 7 saves after spending some time on the disabled list with a pectoral strain. His team would make the postseason for the first time since the 2013 championship season. In the 2016 ALDS, Uehara pitched 2 games without allowing a run in 2 innings but the Red Sox got swept by the Cleveland Indians in 3 games.[17] Chicago Cubs[edit] On December 14, 2016, Uehara agreed to a one-year contract with the Chicago Cubs
Chicago Cubs
for $6 million. On June 21, 2017, Uehara walked a batter with the bases loaded for the first time in his career.[18] Second stint with Yomiuri Giants[edit] On March 9, 2018, Uehara signed a one-year contract[19] with the Yomiuri Giants.[20] Personal[edit] Uehara is a friend of former MLB pitcher Roger Clemens; they first met when Clemens visited Japan
Japan
in 2004. MLB.com featured a video in which Clemens gave Uehara a signed, game-used glove.[21] References[edit]

^ "Major League leaderboards for [..] pitchers with custom statistics". Fangraphs.com. Archived from the original on August 13, 2013. Retrieved August 13, 2013.  ^ "時事ドットコム". Jiji.com. Archived from the original on March 4, 2016. Retrieved October 4, 2011.  ^ "Orioles sign pitcher Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
to two-year contract". Baltimore.orioles.mlb.com. January 13, 2009. Retrieved October 4, 2011.  ^ "Yoshinori Tateyama". Baseball-Reference.com:8080. Retrieved October 4, 2011.  ^ " Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
Statistics and History". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved October 4, 2011.  ^ Edes, Gordon (December 7, 2012). "Source: Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
to Red Sox". ESPN. Retrieved December 9, 2012.  ^ [1] ^ Lauber, Scott (September 12, 2013). " Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
makes history, Mike Carp is grand in Red Sox' 10-inning win". Retrieved July 27, 2014.  ^ Benbow, Julian (September 18, 2013). " Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
loses streak as Red Sox falter in ninth". Retrieved July 27, 2014.  ^ "Koji Uehara". Fangraphs.com. Retrieved July 27, 2014.  ^ " Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
is your ALCS MVP". NBC Sports. Retrieved October 20, 2013.  ^ Speier, Alex. "WEII.com". Retrieved July 27, 2014.  ^ [2] ^ Brasseur, Kyle (September 5, 2014). " Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
out as Red Sox closer". ESPN.com. Retrieved September 5, 2014.  ^ "Red Sox sign Uehara to two-year deal". MLB.com. October 30, 2014. Retrieved October 30, 2014.  ^ " Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
injury: Red Sox closer (wrist fracture) to miss rest of season". SI.com. August 10, 2015. Retrieved August 18, 2015.  ^ " Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
Stats Baseball-Reference.com". Baseball-Reference.com. Retrieved 2016-10-27.  ^ "Reliever Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
agrees to 1-year deal with Cubs". ESPN.com. December 14, 2016. Retrieved December 14, 2016.  ^ "Former Red Sox closer Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
signs with Yomiuri Giants". espn.com. March 9, 2018. Retrieved March 9, 2018.  ^ "上原投手が10年ぶりに巨人軍復帰「優勝に貢献」と決意表明". 読売巨人軍公式WEBサイト (in Japanese). March 9, 2018. Retrieved March 10, 2018.  ^ [3]

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Koji Uehara.

Career statistics and player information from MLB, or ESPN, or Baseball-Reference, or Fangraphs, or The Baseball Cube, or Baseball-Reference (Minors) Nippon Professional Baseball
Baseball
career statistics from JapaneseBaseball.com Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
on Twitter
Twitter
(in Japanese) Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
official site (in Japanese) ArmchairGM Profile Page for Koji Uehara Japanese league stats, info, and links for Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
by JapaneseBallPlayers.com Baseball
Baseball
Prospectus > What the Internet Can Teach Us About Koji Uehara

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American League Championship Series MVP Award

1980: White 1981: Nettles 1982: Lynn 1983: Boddicker 1984: Gibson 1985: Brett 1986: Barrett 1987: Gaetti 1988: Eckersley 1989: Henderson 1990: Stewart 1991: Puckett 1992: Alomar 1993: Stewart 1994: Series Not Played 1995: Hershiser 1996: Williams 1997: Grissom 1998: Wells 1999: Hernández 2000: Justice 2001: Pettitte 2002: Kennedy 2003: Rivera 2004: Ortiz 2005: Konerko 2006: Polanco 2007: Beckett 2008: Garza 2009: Sabathia 2010: Hamilton 2011: Cruz 2012: Young 2013: Uehara 2014: Cain 2015: Escobar 2016: Miller 2017: Verlander

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Central League Rookie of the Year Award

1950: Oshima 1951: Matsuda 1952: T. Sato 1953: M. Gondo 1954: Hirooka 1955: Nishimura 1956: Akiyama 1957: M. Fujita 1958: Nagashima 1959: Kuwata 1960: Horimoto 1961: H. Gondo 1962: Jōnouchi 1963: None 1964: S. Takahashi 1965: None 1966: Horiuchi 1967: Takegami 1968: Takada 1969: Tabuchi 1970: Yazawa 1971: Sekimoto 1972: Yasuda 1973: None 1974: Fujinami 1975: None 1976: Tao 1977: Saito 1978: Sumi 1979: Fujisawa 1980: Okada 1981: Hara 1982: Tsuda 1983: Makihara 1984: Kobayakawa 1985: Kawabata 1986: Nagatomi 1987: Arai 1988: Tatsunami 1989: Tomashino 1990: Yoda 1991: Morita 1992: Kuji 1993: Ito 1994: Yabu 1995: Yamauchi 1996: Nishi 1997: Sawazaki 1998: Kawakami 1999: Uehara 2000: Kinjoh 2001: Akahoshi 2002: Ishikawa 2003: Kisanuki 2004: Kawashima 2005: Aoki 2006: Soyogi 2007: Uezono 2008: Yamaguchi 2009: Matsumoto 2010: Chōno 2011: Sawamura 2012: Nomura 2013: Ogawa 2014: Ohsera 2015: Yamasaki 2016: Takayama 2017: Kyoda

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Eiji Sawamura Award

1947: Bessho 1948: Nakao 1949: Fujimoto 1950: Sanada 1951: Sugishita 1952: Sugishita 1953: Otomo 1954: Sugishita 1955: Bessho 1956: Kaneda 1957: Kaneda 1958: Kaneda 1959: Murayama 1960: Horimoto 1961: Gondoh 1962: Koyama 1963: Ito 1964: Bacque 1965: Murayama 1966: Murayama & Horiuchi 1967: Ogawa 1968: Enatsu 1969: Takahashi 1970: Hiramatsu 1971: Not Awarded 1972: Horiuchi 1973: Takahashi 1974: Hoshino 1975: Sotokoba 1976: Ikegaya 1977: Kobayashi 1978: Matsuoka 1979: Kobayashi 1980: Not Awarded 1981: Nishimoto 1982: Kitabeppu 1983: Endo 1984: Not Awarded 1985: Komatsu 1986: Kitabeppu 1987: Kuwata 1988: Ohno 1989: M. Saito 1990: Nomo 1991: Sasaoka 1992: Ishii 1993: Imanaka 1994: Yamamoto 1995: M. Saito 1996: M. Saito 1997: Nishiguchi 1998: Kawasaki 1999: Uehara 2000: Not Awarded 2001: Matsuzaka 2002: Uehara 2003: Igawa & K. Saito 2004: Kawakami 2005: Sugiuchi 2006: K. Saito 2007: Darvish 2008: Iwakuma 2009: Wakui 2010: Maeda 2011: Tanaka 2012: Settsu 2013: Tanaka 2014: Kaneko 2015: Maeda 2016: Johnson 2017: Sugano

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Japan
Japan
roster – 2006 World Baseball Classic
World Baseball Classic
– Champions

1 Akinori Iwamura 2 Michihiro Ogasawara 3 Nobuhiko Matsunaka 5 Kazuhiro Wada 6 Hitoshi Tamura 7 Tsuyoshi Nishioka 8 Toshiaki Imae 9 Tatsuhiko Kinjoh 10 Shinya Miyamoto 11 Naoyuki Shimizu 12 Soichi Fujita 15 Tomoyuki Kubota 17 Kosuke Fukudome 18 Daisuke Matsuzaka 19 Koji Uehara 20 Yasuhiko Yabuta 21 Tsuyoshi Wada 22 Tomoya Satozaki 23 Nori Aoki 24 Kyuji Fujikawa 25 Takahiro Arai 27 Motonobu Tanishige 31 Shunsuke Watanabe 40 Akinori Otsuka 41 Hiroyuki Kobayashi 47 Toshiya Sugiuchi 51 Ichiro Suzuki 52 Munenori Kawasaki 59 Ryoji Aikawa 61 Hirotoshi Ishii 61 Takahiro Mahara

Manager 89 Sadaharu Oh Coach 84 Kazuhiro Takeda Coach 85 Hatsuhiko Tsuji Coach 86 Yoshitaka Katori Coach 87 Yasunori Oshima Coach 88 Sumio Hirota

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Boston Red Sox
Boston Red Sox
2013 World Series
World Series
champions

2 Jacoby Ellsbury 3 David Ross 5 Jonny Gomes 7 Stephen Drew 11 Clay Buchholz 12 Mike Napoli 15 Dustin Pedroia 16 Will Middlebrooks 18 Shane Victorino 19 Koji Uehara
Koji Uehara
(ALCS MVP) 22 Félix Doubront 29 Daniel Nava 31 Jon Lester 32 Craig Breslow 34 David Ortiz
David Ortiz
( World Series
World Series
MVP) 36 Junichi Tazawa 37 Mike Carp 39 Jarrod Saltalamacchia 41 John Lackey 44 Jake Peavy 46 Ryan Dempster 50 Quintin Berry 56 Franklin Morales 67 Brandon Workman 72 Xander Bogaerts

Manager 53 John Farrell

Third base coach 13 Brian Butterfield Bench coach 17 Torey Lovullo Hitting coach 28 Greg Colbrunn First Base coach 43 Arnie Beyeler Pitching coach 47 Juan Nieves Assistant hitting coach 57 Vic Rodriguez Bullpen coach 58 Dana LeVangie Bullpen catcher 83 Brian Abraham Bullpen catcher 88 Alex Martinez

Regular season American League Division Series American League Championship Series

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Yomiuri Giants
Yomiuri Giants
current roster

First squad

00 Takayuki Terauchi 0 Naoki Yoshikawa 2 Dai-Kang Yang 5 Alex Guerrero 6 Hayato Sakamoto 7 Hisayoshi Chōno 10 Shinnosuke Abe 11 Koji Uehara 12 Ryota Wakiya 15 Hirokazu Sawamura 17 Kan Otake 18 Toshiya Sugiuchi 19 Tomoyuki Sugano 20 Scott Mathieson 21 Mitsuo Yoshikawa 22 Seiji Kobayashi 23 Ryoma Nogami 25 Kazuma Okamoto 26 Tetsuya Utsumi 27 Shingo Usami 30 Ryosuke Miyaguni 31 Tetsuya Matsumoto 32 Itaru Hashimoto 33 Casey McGehee 35 Kentaro Nishimura 37 Seiji Tahara 39 Taylor Jungmann 42 Shun Yamaguchi 44 Arquimedes Caminero 45 Nobutaka Imamura 47 Tetsuya Yamaguchi 90 Kazuto Taguchi

Second squad

9 Yoshiyuki Kamei 13 Masahiko Morifuku 28 Seishū Hatake 29 Takuya Kuwahara 36 Toshiki Sakurai 38 Yukinori Kishida 40 Tappei Tanioka 41 Kōta Nakagawa 43 Shinnosuke Shigenobu 46 Takumi Ohshiro 48 Shun Ikeda 49 Shingo Ishikawa 50 Chiaki Tone 52 Takumi Kitamura 53 Hōsei Takata 56 Yasuhiro Yamamoto 58 Soichiro Tateoka 59 Takahiro Kakizawa 60 Akihiro Wakabayashi 61 Daisuke Nakai 62 Shimpei Shinohara 63 Shunta Tanaka 64 Ryūsei Ōe 65 Harutomo Tsuji 66 Kaito Murakami 67 Ren Wada 68 Daiki Yoshikawa 69 Takaya Tanaka 91 Hirotaka Yonahara 93 Dai Yuasa 94 Genki Kawano 97 Jen-Lei Liao 99 Makoto Aoyama

Coaching

Manager: 24 Yoshinobu Takahashi Second squad manager: 83 Masaki Saito

Authority control

WorldCat Identities VIAF: 252718237 N

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