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Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery is in Kensal Green
Kensal Green
in the Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea in London, England. Inspired by Père Lachaise Cemetery in Paris, it was founded by the barrister George Frederick Carden.[1] The cemetery opened in 1833 and comprises 72 acres of grounds, including two conservation areas, adjoining a canal. The cemetery is home to at least 33 species of bird and other wildlife. This distinctive cemetery has memorials ranging from large mausoleums housing the rich and famous to many distinctive smaller graves and includes special areas dedicated to the very young. It has three chapels, and serves all faiths.[2] The cemetery was immortalised in the lines of G. K. Chesterton's poem "The Rolling English Road" from his book The Flying Inn: "For there is good news yet to hear and fine things to be seen; Before we go to Paradise by way of Kensal Green."[3] Despite its Grecian-style buildings the cemetery is primarily Gothic in character, due to the high number of private Gothic monuments. Due to this atmosphere, the cemetery was the chosen location of several scenes in movies, notably in Theatre of Blood. The cemetery is listed Grade I on the Register of Historic Parks and Gardens.[4] It remains in use.

Contents

1 Location 2 History and description

2.1 Establishment and design 2.2 Layout

3 Notable structures

3.1 The Anglican
Anglican
Chapel 3.2 Dissenters' Chapel 3.3 The Reformers' Memorial

4 The Catacombs 5 War graves 6 Notable burials

6.1 Royal burials 6.2 Notable cremations

7 See also 8 Sources 9 References 10 External links

Location[edit] The cemetery is in London's Royal Borough of Kensington and Chelsea. Its main entrance is on Harrow Road
Harrow Road
(west of where Ladbroke Grove and Chamberlayne Road meet). Its other entrance, Alma Place (the West Gate, almost opposite Greyhound Road) is also on the north side. Alma Place leads to the West London
London
Crematorium (whose owner and operater is the same) and St. Mary's Roman Catholic Cemetery, which are in the London
London
Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham. The cemetery lies between Harrow Road
Harrow Road
and the Paddington Arm
Paddington Arm
of the Grand Union Canal
Grand Union Canal
to the south which has long been separated by a wall. A set of defunct gates is set in the southern wall which adjoins the canal where barges took a proportion of earth from excavating graves and occasionally coffins carried by barge were unloaded. History and description[edit] Establishment and design[edit] George Frederick Carden had failed with an earlier attempt to establish a British equivalent to Paris's Père Lachaise Cemetery
Père Lachaise Cemetery
in 1825, but a new committee established in February 1830,[5] including Andrew Spottiswoode, MP for Saltash, sculptor Robert William Sievier, banker Sir John Dean Paul,[1] Charles Broughton Bowman (first committee secretary),[6] and architects Thomas Willson (who had previously proposed an ambitious Metropolitan Sepulchre project) and Augustus Charles Pugin,[7] gained more financial, political and public support to fund the "General Cemetery Company". Public meetings were held in June and July 1830 at the Freemasons' Tavern, and Carden was elected treasurer.[5] Paul, a partner in the London
London
banking firm of Strahan, Paul, Paul and Bates, found and conditionally purchased the 54 acres of land at Kensal Green
Kensal Green
for £9,500. However, Paul and Carden were already embroiled in a dispute regarding the design of the cemetery, where Paul favoured the Grecian style and Carden the Gothic style. A succession of architects were contemplated, including Benjamin Wyatt (who declined), Charles Fowler
Charles Fowler
(proposal not taken up), Francis Goodwin, Willson, and a Mr Lidell, a pupil of John Nash, before an architectural competition was launched in November 1831. This attracted 46 entrants, and in March 1832 the premium was awarded, despite some opposition, for a Gothic Revival design by Henry Edward Kendall;[7] this decision was, however, eventually overturned. On 11 July 1832, the Act of Parliament establishing a "General Cemetery Company for the interment of the Dead in the Neighbourhood of the Metropolis" gained Royal Assent. The Act authorised it to raise up to £45,000 in shares, buy up to 80 acres of land and build a cemetery and a Church of England
Church of England
chapel. Company directors appointed after the Bill received Royal Assent asserted their control and preference for a different style. One of the competition judges and a company shareholder, John William Griffith, who had previously produced working drawings for a boundary wall, ultimately designed the cemetery's two chapels and the main gateway[5] and 15,000 trees were supplied and planted by Hugh Ronalds from his nursery in Brentford.[8] Founded as the General Cemetery of All Souls, Kensal Green, the cemetery was the first of the "Magnificent Seven" garden-style cemeteries in London. It was consecrated on 24 January 1833 by Charles James Blomfield, the Bishop of London, receiving its first funeral the same month. In the early 1850s, after a series of cholera epidemics in London caused an examination of London's burial facilities, health commissioner Edwin Chadwick
Edwin Chadwick
proposed the closure of all existing burial grounds in the vicinity of London
London
other than the privately owned Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery, northwest of the city, which was to be nationalised and greatly enlarged to provide a single burial ground for west London. (A large tract of land on the Thames around 9 miles (14 km) southeast of London
London
in Abbey Wood
Abbey Wood
was to become a single burial ground for east London.[9]) The Treasury was sceptical that Chadwick's scheme would ever be financially viable, and it was widely unpopular.[10][11] Although the Metropolitan Interments Act 1850 authorised the scheme, it was abandoned in 1852.[11][12]

A typical statuary detail

Layout[edit] The overall layout is on an east-west axes, with a central path leading to a raised chapel towards the west. The entrance is to the north-east and the largest monuments line the central path to the chapel. The Church of England
Church of England
was allotted 39 acres and the remaining 15, clearly separated, acres were given over to Dissenters, a distinction deemed crucial at the time. Originally there was a division between the Dissenters’ part of the cemetery and the Anglican
Anglican
section. This took the form of a "sunk fence" from the canal to the gate piers on the path. There were also decorative iron gates. The small area designated for non- Anglican
Anglican
burials is approximately oval in shape and was formerly made prominent by a wider central axis path that terminated with the neo-classical chapel with curved colonnades. The Anglican
Anglican
Chapel dominates the western section of the cemetery, being raised on a terrace beneath that is an extensive catacomb; there is a hydraulic catafalque for lowering coffins into the catacomb.[13] It is still in operation today; burials and cremations take place daily, although cremations are now more common than interments. The cemetery is still run by the General Cemetery Company under its original Act of Parliament. This mandates that bodies there may not be exhumed and cremated or the land sold for development. Once the cemetery has exhausted all its interment space and can no longer function as a cemetery, the mandate requires that it shall remain a memorial park. The General Cemetery Company constructed and runs the West London
London
Crematorium within the grounds of the cemetery. While borrowing from the ideals established at Père Lachaise some years before, Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery contributed to the design and management basis for many cemetery projects throughout the British Empire of the time. In Australia, for example, the Necropolis at Rookwood (1868) and Waverley Cemetery
Waverley Cemetery
(1877), both in Sydney, are noted for their use of the "gardenesque" landscape qualities and importantly self-sustaining management structures championed by the General Cemetery Company. The cemetery is the burial site of approximately 250,000 individuals in 65,000 graves, including upwards of 500 members of the British nobility and 970 people listed in the Dictionary of National Biography. Many monuments, particularly the larger ones, lean precariously as they have settled over time on the underlying London clay. Notable structures[edit] Many buildings and structures within Kensal Green
Kensal Green
are listed. The Anglican
Anglican
Chapel is listed Grade I, while the Dissenters' Chapel, Kensal Green
Kensal Green
is listed Grade II* and the colonnade/catacomb and perimeter walls and railings are listed Grade II. Of the many tombs, memorials and mausoleums, eight are listed Grade II*, while The Reformers' Memorial is listed Grade II. The Anglican
Anglican
Chapel[edit] The Anglican
Anglican
Chapel is at the centre of the cemetery, and contains several tombs. Under the chapel is a catacomb, one of the few in London. The catacomb is currently not maintained but can be visited as part of a guided tour. It still has a working coffin-lift or catafalque, restored by The Friends of Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery in 1997. Dissenters' Chapel[edit] Main Article: Dissenters' Chapel, Kensal Green Situated in the E corner of the cemetery this Greek Revival
Greek Revival
structure was for the use of all non- Anglican
Anglican
denominations and of non-believers. Only part of the cemetery was consecrated and Dissenters could opt to be buried in the non-consecrated areas following a service here. Since the cemetery became favoured by nonconformists, free-thinkers, non Christians and atheists this chapel became popular. The Dissenters' Chapel had become derelict and partly roofless, so in 1995 was leased to the Historic Chapels Trust
Historic Chapels Trust
who undertook £447,000 of restoration. The chapel currently serves as the office of The Friends of Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery, but is also available for secular and dissenting funeral services.

Detail of the Reformers' Memorial

Robert Owen
Robert Owen
memorial (with the Reformers' Memorial to the right)

The Reformers' Memorial[edit] The Reformers' Memorial was erected in 1885. It was erected at the instigation of Joseph Corfield "to the memory of men and women who have generously given their time and means to improve the conditions and enlarge the happiness of all classes of society". Lists of names of reformers and radicals on north and east sides (together with further names added in 1907 by Emma Corfield). A pair to the Robert Owen memorial, and a second instance of a non-funerary memorial in the cemetery's nonconformist section. The memorial was amended to include Lloyd Jones to recognise his contribution. "THIS MEMORIAL IS RAISED AS A TOKEN OF REGARD TO THE BRAVE MEN AND WOMEN WHOSE NAMES IT BEARS BY JOSEPH W. CORFIELD, AUGUST 1895." "THE REFORMERS' MEMORIAL ERECTED TO THE GLORY OF MEN AND WOMEN WHO HAVE GENEROUSLY GIVEN THEIR TIME AND MEANS TO IMPROVE THE CONDITIONS AND ENHANCE THE HAPPINESS OF ALL CLASSES OF SOCIETY. THEY HAVE FELT THAT A FAR HAPPIER AND MORE PROSPEROUS LIFE IS WITHIN THE REACH OF ALL MEN, AND THEY HAVE EARNESTLY SOUGHT TO REALIZE IT. THE OLD BRUTAL LAWS OF IMPRISONMENT FOR FREE PRINTING HAVE BEEN SWEPT AWAY AND THE RIGHT OF SELECTING OUR OWN LAW MAKERS HAS BEEN GAINED MAINLY BY THEIR EFFORTS. THE EXERCISE OF THESE RIGHTS WILL GIVE THE PEOPLE AN INTEREST IN THE LAWS THAT GOVERN THEM, AND WILL MAKE THEM BETTER MEN AND BETTER CITIZENS."[14] A great number of people are mentioned on the monument. These are, in order shown on the monument:

FRONT FACE (EAST): Robert Owen
Robert Owen
(New Lanark), John Bellers, Robert Dale Owen, Abraham Combe, Joseph Lancaster, William Thompson, John Minter Morgan, William Pare, William Galpin, Henry Travis MD, Alex Campbell, James Rigby, W. D. Saull, Julian Hibbert, Rev. Charles Kingsley, Lady Noel Byron, Frances Wright, Thomas Spence, Allan Davenport, Mary Hennell, Francis Place, Harriet Martineau, George Odger, Lloyd Jones SOUTH FACE: Elizabeth Fry, Sarah Martin, Mary Carpenter, Benjamin Flower, Henry Fawcett, Barbara Bodichon, Maria Grey, Arnold Toynbee, W. K. Clifford, Edward T. Craig, C. Dobson Collet, Charles Bradlaugh, Richard Congreve, William Morris, John Ruskin, F. Power Cobbe, Herbert Spencer, Wathen M.W. Call, Francis Newman, Hodgson Pratt, Lydia Becker, Josephine Butler, Anna Swanwick, C. Jacob Holyoake, J. Kells Ingram NORTH FACE: Joseph Priestley, Thomas Paine, William Hone, John Stuart Mill, Major Cartwright, Richard Carlile, William Lovett, William Carpenter, Henry Hetherington, John Frost, William Cobbett, W. J. Fox, Richard Moore, William Howitt, Samuel Bamford, Henry Hunt, George Thompson, David Williams, Thomas Wooller, Ebenezer Elliott, Ernest Jones, Alex Macdonald, Richard Cobden, Robert Cooper.[14]

The entry for Robert Owen
Robert Owen
reads: The cenotaph to Robert Owen, who was buried in Newtown, Montgomeryshire, Wales, is fittingly at the side of the Reformers' Memorial. "ROBERT OWEN PHILANTHROPIST BORN MAY 14TH. 1771. DIED NOVR. 17TH. 1858." "1879 ERECTED BY SUBSCRIPTION IN MEMORY OF ROBERT OWEN OF NEW LANARK, BORN AT NEWTOWN, N. WALES 1771. HE DIED AND WAS BURIED AT THE SAME PLACE 1858, AGED 87 YEARS. ––––––––––––– HE ORIGINATED AND ORGANIZED INFANT SCHOOLS, HE SECURED A REDUCTION OF THE HOURS OF LABOUR FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN IN FACTORIES. HE WAS A LIBERAL SUPPORTER OF THE EARLY EFFORTS IN FAVOUR OF NATIONAL EDUCATION AND LABOURED TO PROMOTE INTERNATIONAL ARBITRATION. HE WAS ONE OF THE FOREMOST ENGLISHMEN WHO TAUGHT MEN TO ASPIRE TO A HIGHER SOCIAL STATE BY RECONCILING THE INTERESTS OF CAPITAL AND LABOUR. HE SPENT HIS LIFE AND A LARGE FORTUNE IN SEEKING TO IMPROVE HIS FELLOW MEN BY GIVING THEM EDUCATION, SELF-RELIANCE AND MORE WORTH.

HIS LIFE WAS SANCTIFIED BY HUMAN AFFECTION AND LOFTY EFFORT.

J. W. CORFIELD"

"MR. OWEN'S WRITINGS ––––––––––––––––– REPORT TO THE COUNTY OF LANARK. NEW VIEWS OF SOCIETY. TWELVE LECTURES. LECTURES ON MARRIAGE. LECTURES ON A NEW STATE OF SOCIETY. THE BOOK OF THE NEW MORAL WORLD. SIX LECTURES AT MANCHESTER. MANIFESTO OF ROBERT OWEN. SELF SUPPORTING HOME COLONIES. LETTERS TO THE HUMAN RACE. REVOLUTION IN MIND AND PRACTICE. ROBERT OWEN'S JOURNAL. LIFE OF ROBERT OWEN."[14] The Catacombs[edit]

The Catacombs

The cemetery is distinguished by three catacombs for the deposit of lead-sealed, triple-shelled coffins and cremated remains. Catacomb
Catacomb
A, beneath the North Terrace Colonnade
Colonnade
is now sealed. Catacomb
Catacomb
Z, beneath the Dissenters' Chapel at the eastern end of the cemetery, suffered significant bomb damage during World War II, and is also closed to further deposits. Catacomb
Catacomb
B, beneath the Anglican
Anglican
Chapel in the centre of the cemetery, has space for some 4000 deposits, and still offers both private loculi and shelves or vaults for family groups. The catacomb extends under the entire footprint of the chapel and its colonnades. There are six aisles, within which each vault is also numbered, running consecutively to number 216 at the south-western end of aisle 6. Deposit within the catacombs of Kensal Green
Kensal Green
has always been more expensive and prestigious than burial in a simple plot in the grounds of the cemetery, although less costly than a brick-lined grave or mausoleum. Without the further expense and responsibility of a monument above the grave, the catacombs have afforded a secure, dignified and exclusive resting place for the well-to-do, particularly the unmarried, the childless and young children of those without family plots or mausolea elsewhere.[15] War graves[edit] The cemetery contains the graves of 473 Commonwealth service personnel of the First World War – half of whom form a war graves plot in the south-west corner, the remainder in small groups or individual graves scattered throughout the grounds – and 51 of the Second who are all dispersed. In the First World War
First World War
plot, at Section 213, a Screen Wall memorial lists casualties of both world wars whose graves could not be marked by headstones, besides five Second World War servicemen who were cremated at Kensal Green
Kensal Green
(also known as West London) Crematorium.[16] The highest ranking person buried here who is commemorated by the CWGC is General Sir Charles Douglas (1850–1914), Chief of the Imperial General Staff
Chief of the Imperial General Staff
in early months of the First World War.[17] Notable burials[edit]

Monuments and chapel

Henry Ainley
Henry Ainley
(1879–1945), actor Harrison Ainsworth
Harrison Ainsworth
(1805–1882), author Thomas Allom
Thomas Allom
(1804–1872), artist and architect Frederick Scott Archer
Frederick Scott Archer
(1813–1857), sculptor, photographer. Inventor of the Collodion process[18] Charles Phillip Brown (1798–1884), an Englishman known for writing the first Telugu dictionary and for his contributions towards Telugu language and Andhra people George Percy Badger
George Percy Badger
(1815–1888), English Anglican
Anglican
missionary and scholar of oriental studies Betsy Balcombe (1802−1871), as a young girl, a close friend and confidante of Napoleon Bonaparte
Napoleon Bonaparte
during his imprisonment on St. Helena Island Michael William Balfe
Michael William Balfe
(1808–1870), composer

Grave of Frederick Scott Archer, inventor of the collodion photographic process in 1851. Location

Frederick Settle Barff
Frederick Settle Barff
(1822–1866), chemist, inventor of Bower–Barff process James Barry (1795–1865), surgeon George Birkbeck
George Birkbeck
(1776–1841), doctor, academic and adult education pioneer William Behnes
William Behnes
(1795–1864), sculptor Julius Benedict
Julius Benedict
(1804–1885), composer Charles Blondin
Charles Blondin
(1824–1897), acrobat, tightrope-walker Sir George Bowen
George Bowen
(1821–1899), colonial administrator and 9th Governor of Hong Kong Lady Diamantina Bowen
Diamantina Bowen
(c. 1832/1833–1893), grand dame John Braham
John Braham
(1774–1856), singer George Bridgetower
George Bridgetower
(1782–1860), West Indian-Polish violin virtuoso and friend of Beethoven Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais
Louis-Charles Mahé de La Bourdonnais
(1795–1840), chess master Howe Browne, 2nd Marquess of Sligo
Howe Browne, 2nd Marquess of Sligo
(1788–1845) Samuel George Bonham
Samuel George Bonham
(1803-1863), 1st Baronet Isambard Kingdom Brunel
Isambard Kingdom Brunel
(1806–1859), engineer, son of Marc Isambard Brunel and Sophia Kingdom (also buried here) Marc Isambard Brunel
Marc Isambard Brunel
(1769–1849), engineer, father of Isambard William Burn, eminent Scottish architect (1789–1870) Peter Burrowes
Peter Burrowes
(1753–1841) Irish politician Decimus Burton
Decimus Burton
(1800–1881), architect Sir Augustus Wall Callcott
Augustus Wall Callcott
(1779–1844), painter Lady Maria Callcott (1785–1842), travel writer George Frederick Carden (1798–1874), founder of the cemetery John Edward Carew
John Edward Carew
(1785–1868), sculptor Anthony Carlisle
Anthony Carlisle
(1768–1840), surgeon and scientist Sir Ernest Cassel
Ernest Cassel
(1852–1921), merchant banker William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland
William Cavendish-Scott-Bentinck, 5th Duke of Portland
(1800–1879), landowner and eccentric Frederic Chapman
Frederic Chapman
(1823-1895), publisher Marigold Frances Churchill, daughter of Sir Winston and Lady Clementine Churchill, who died from a fever in 1921 at age three (the monument by Eric Gill
Eric Gill
was listed Grade II in 2001) Thomas John Cochrane
Thomas John Cochrane
(Sir) (1789–1872) Cemetery plot number 21777, 1st governor of Newfoundland 1825–34, Member of Parliament for Ipswich
Ipswich
1839–41, Admiral of the fleet 1865–72 Wilkie Collins
Wilkie Collins
(1824–1889), author James Combe (d. 1867), engineer of Temple Works, Leeds Joshua Compston (1970-1996), curator Montague Corry, 1st Baron Rowton
Montague Corry, 1st Baron Rowton
(1838–1903), secretary to Disraeli and philanthropic founder of Rowton Houses Rev John Cumming (1807–1881), author James Dark (1795–1871), proprietor of Lord's Cricket Ground Philmore 'Boots' Davidson (1928–1993) Trinidadian musician. Introduced the steel band to Britain Admiral Ross Donnelly
Ross Donnelly
(1761–1840) Andrew Ducrow
Andrew Ducrow
(1793–1842), circus performer and horse-rider Willie Edouin
Willie Edouin
(1841–1908), comedian, actor and theatre manager Sir George Elliot (1784–1863), naval officer Dr John Epps
John Epps
(1805–1869), phrenologist John Edward Errington
John Edward Errington
(1806–1862) civil engineer Edward Francis Fitzwilliam (1824–1857), composer Fanny Fitzwilliam
Fanny Fitzwilliam
(1801–1854), actress, singer and theatre manager Henri Jean-Baptiste Victoire Fradelle
Henri Jean-Baptiste Victoire Fradelle
(1778–1865), Franco-English Victorian painter Erich Fried (1921–1988), Austrian poet and essayist Henry Gauntlett (1810–1876), composer John Gibson (1817–1892), architect. RIBA Gold Medal recipient 1890 Sir Walter Raleigh Gilbert
Walter Raleigh Gilbert
(1785–1853) George Bellas Greenough
George Bellas Greenough
(1778–1855), geologist George Grossmith
George Grossmith
(1847–1912), actor and comedian Philip Hardwick
Philip Hardwick
(1792–1870), architect Philip Charles Hardwick
Philip Charles Hardwick
(1822–1892), architect Henry Hawkins, 1st Baron Brampton
Henry Hawkins, 1st Baron Brampton
(1817–1907) Catherine Hayes (1818–1861), opera singer Henry Herman (1832–1894), English dramatist and novelist Rev Ridley Herschell
Ridley Herschell
(1807–1864) Major General Sir John Hills FRSE
FRSE
CB KCB (1834-1902) Thomas Hood
Thomas Hood
(1799–1845), poet, humorist and journalist

Grave of Henry Howard, 3rd Earl of Effingham

Henry Howard, 3rd Earl of Effingham
Henry Howard, 3rd Earl of Effingham
(1837–1898) Sir Neville Howse
Neville Howse
(1863–1930), the first Australian recipient of the Victoria Cross, and one of 13 holders of the award buried in this cemetery Joseph Hume
Joseph Hume
(1777–1855), MP and political campaigner James Henry Leigh Hunt
James Henry Leigh Hunt
(1784–1859), Romantic critic, essayist and poet Frank Linsly James
Frank Linsly James
(1851-1890), exhumed in 1917 and re-interred in the family plot at West Dean, West Sussex. Sir Leander Starr Jameson
Leander Starr Jameson
(1853–1917), former Prime Minister of Cape Colony and architect of the Jameson Raid
Jameson Raid
- initially buried in a vault here, later reburied in Matobo Hills, Zimbabwe Lionel Johnson (1867–1902), poet, member of the Rhymer's Club and an influence on W.B Yeats Charles Kemble
Charles Kemble
(1775–1854), actor and theatre manager Fanny Kemble
Fanny Kemble
(1809–1893), famous British actress and author Halina Korn
Halina Korn
(1902–1978), Polish painter and sculptor Marian Kukiel
Marian Kukiel
(1885–1972), Polish General and Minister for War in exile during World War II Michael Lane (1802–1868), civil engineer William Garrett Lewis (b. before 1834; d. 1885) pastor of Westbourne Grove Church Wyndham Lewis
Wyndham Lewis
(1882-1957), painter and author, co-founder of the Vorticist movement Joseph Locke
Joseph Locke
(1805–1860), civil engineer John St. John Long
John St. John Long
(1798–1834), quack doctor John Claudius Loudon, (1783–1843), Scottish botanist and writer on cemeteries John Graham Lough
John Graham Lough
(1789–1876), sculptor Sir John Louis, 2nd Baronet
Sir John Louis, 2nd Baronet
(1785–1863) Sir Andrew Lusk, 1st Baronet (1810–1909) Lord Mayor of London 1873-74 John Robinson McClean
John Robinson McClean
(1817–1873), politician Alexander McDonnell (1798–1835), chess master Richard Graves MacDonnell (1814–1881), colonial administrator and 6th Governor of Hong Kong Sir James McGrigor
James McGrigor
(1771–1858), Scottish botanist Sir Donald Friell McLeod
Donald Friell McLeod
(1810–1872) William Macready
William Macready
(1793–1873), actor Sir George Makins(1853–1933), surgeon Edward Maltby
Edward Maltby
(1770–1859), bishop of Durham Florence Marryat (1833–1899), novelist, editor, actress and playwright Kitty Melrose
Kitty Melrose
(1883–1912), actress Ras Andargachew Messai (1902–1981), Ethiopian ruler John Maddison Morton
John Maddison Morton
(1811–1891), playwright John Lothrop Motley
John Lothrop Motley
(1814–1877), American historian Billy Murdoch
Billy Murdoch
(1854–1911), Australian cricket captain John Trivett Nettleship, (1841–1902), painter and author Admiral Robert Otway, (1773–1846) Robert Owen
Robert Owen
(cenotaph only) (1771–1858), industrialist and major social reformer John Thomas Perceval (1803–1876), army officer, writer and campaigner Jacob Perkins
Jacob Perkins
(1766–1849), American inventor George Perry (1793–1862), composer Harold Pinter
Harold Pinter
(1930–2008), playwright, actor, director, screenwriter, poet and political activist Frederic Hervey Foster Quin
Frederic Hervey Foster Quin
(1799–1878), physician[19] Sir Terence Rattigan
Terence Rattigan
(1911–1977), playwright Robert Reece
Robert Reece
(1838–1891), comic playwright and librettist Emil Reich
Emil Reich
(1854–1910), Austro-Hungarian-born historian[20] John Rennie the Younger
John Rennie the Younger
(1794–1874) civil engineer John Wigham Richardson
John Wigham Richardson
(1837–1908), shipbuilder Charles Ritchie, 1st Baron Ritchie of Dundee
Charles Ritchie, 1st Baron Ritchie of Dundee
(1838-1906), politician, former Chancellor of Exchequer Henry Sandham
Henry Sandham
(1842–1910), artist Eileen Sharp
Eileen Sharp
(1900 –1958), singer and actress Byam Shaw
Byam Shaw
(1872–1919), artist John Shaw, Jr. (1803–1870), architect and brother-in-law of Philip Hardwick listed above Sir William Siemens (1823–1883), industrialist Robert William Sievier
Robert William Sievier
(1794–1865), sculptor (also member of Cemetery board) John Benjamin Smith
John Benjamin Smith
(1794–1879), MP John Mark Frederick Smith
John Mark Frederick Smith
(1790–1874), British Army
British Army
general William Henry Smith (1792–1865), businessman Howard Staunton
Howard Staunton
(1810–1874), prominent chess player John McDouall Stuart
John McDouall Stuart
(1815–1866), explorer in Australia Dwarkanath Tagore
Dwarkanath Tagore
(1794–1846), Bengali industrialist and benefactor

Grave of William Makepeace Thackeray
William Makepeace Thackeray
(marble slab in front of brick tomb)

William Makepeace Thackeray
William Makepeace Thackeray
(1811–1863), writer Bert Thomas
Bert Thomas
(1883–1966), cartoonist Lydia Thompson
Lydia Thompson
(1838–1908), dancer and actress Thérèse Tietjens
Thérèse Tietjens
(1831–1877), opera singer Steve Peregrin Took
Steve Peregrin Took
(1949–1980), English musician and songwriter (best known as a founder member of Tyrannosaurus Rex) Anthony Trollope
Anthony Trollope
(1815–1882), novelist Sir Thomas Troubridge, 3rd Baronet
Sir Thomas Troubridge, 3rd Baronet
(1815–1867), British army officer J. Stuart Russell (1816–1895), theologian and author James Malcolm Rymer (1814–1884), writer William Vincent Wallace
William Vincent Wallace
(1812–1865), composer Thomas Wakley
Thomas Wakley
(1795–1862), surgeon, campaigner and founder of The Lancet John William Waterhouse
John William Waterhouse
(1849–1917), artist John Whichcord Jr.
John Whichcord Jr.
(1823–1885), architect Jane Williams
Jane Williams
(1798–1884), subject of poems by Percy Bysshe Shelley Alfred Wigan (1814–1878), actor-manager William Williams (1788–1865), radical MP Walter Clopton Wingfield
Walter Clopton Wingfield
(1833–1912), pioneer of lawn tennis

The cemetery is remarkable for the number of Fellows of the Royal Society who are buried there, of whom the following is a small sample:

Charles Babbage
Charles Babbage
FRS (1816) (1791–1871), mathematician, computer scientist George Bishop FRS (1848) William John Broderip
William John Broderip
FRS (1828) Robert Brown FRS (1839) (1773–1858), botanist, discoverer of Brownian motion Samuel Hawksley Burbury FRS (1890) George Busk
George Busk
FRS (1850) (1807–1886), naval surgeon, zoologist and palaeontologist Alexander John Ellis
Alexander John Ellis
FRS (1864) Hugh Falconer
Hugh Falconer
FRS (1845) (1808–1865), naturalist David Forbes FRS (1858), mineralogist Thomas Galloway FRS (1848) John Hall Gladstone
John Hall Gladstone
FRS (1853) Joseph Glynn FRS (1838) John Gould
John Gould
FRS (1843) William Robert Grove
William Robert Grove
Sir, FRS (1847) Edmond Herbert Grove-Hills FRS (1911) Frank McClean FRS (1895) Rudolph Messel FRS (1912) George Newport
George Newport
FRS (1846) Reverend Baden Powell, FRS (1824) father of Robert and Agnes Baden-Powell Joseph Sabine
Joseph Sabine
FRS (1799) George James Symons
George James Symons
FRS (1879) Edward Troughton
Edward Troughton
FRS (1810) Edward Turner FRS (1830), chemist Richard Valpy
Richard Valpy
(1754–1836) influential teacher Nathaniel Wallich
Nathaniel Wallich
FRS (1829)

Royal burials[edit]

British

Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex and son of King George III. Princess Sophia, sister of Prince Augustus Frederick
Augustus Frederick
and daughter of King George III. Prince George, Duke of Cambridge, grandson of George III and commander-in-chief of the British Army.

Overseas

Maharani Jind Kaur, of the Sikh Empire, mother of the last Punjabi Maharaja Duleep Singh
Duleep Singh
– temporarily depsited in the catacomb below the Dissenters' Chapel following her death in exile in 1863 before her body was allowed to return to the Punjab for cremation. Following the discovery of a slab commemorating Jind Kaur
Jind Kaur
(now in the Ancient House Museum, Thetford), a memorial was erected here in 2009.[21]

Tomb of Prince Augustus Frederick, Duke of Sussex

Tomb of Princess Sophia

Funerary monument, Duke of Cambridge

Notable cremations[edit]

West London
London
Crematorium

Major Herbert James
Herbert James
(1888–1958), VC winner at Gallipoli, First World War. Ingrid Bergman
Ingrid Bergman
(1915–1982), actress (most of her ashes were scattered around the islet of Dannholmen off the fishing village of Fjällbacka
Fjällbacka
on the west coast of Sweden where she spent most summers from 1958 to her death in 1982, with the remainder of her ashes buried at Norra begravningsplatsen
Norra begravningsplatsen
in Stockholm, Sweden next to her parents). Freddie Mercury
Freddie Mercury
(1946–1991), singer in the rock band Queen, is commemorated by a small plinth under his real name, Farrokh Bulsara Sir Anthony Nutting (1920–1999), former diplomat and Conservative MP. Alan Rickman
Alan Rickman
(1946–2016), actor and director. Christine Keeler
Christine Keeler
(1942-2017).

See also[edit]

Dissenters' Chapel, Kensal Green List of notable burials at Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery

Sources[edit]

Records held at Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery Liza Picard (2006). Victorian London. Orion. pp. 361–365. ISBN 0-7538-2090-0. 

References[edit]

^ a b The Founding of Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery Accessed 7 February 2014 ^ Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery website. ^ Chesterton, Gilbert Keith (1914). "The Rolling English Road". The Flying Inn.  ^ Historic England, " Kensal Green
Kensal Green
(All Souls) Cemetery (1000817)", National Heritage List for England, retrieved 13 November 2017  ^ a b c "Kensal Green", Survey of London: volume 37: Northern Kensington (1973), pp. 333–339. Accessed 10 February 2014. ^ Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Founders Accessed 10 February 2014 ^ a b Arnold, Catharine (2006). Necropolis: London
London
and its dead. London: Simon & Schuster. ISBN 9781416502487.  ^ Ronalds, B.F. (2017). "Ronalds Nurserymen in Brentford
Brentford
and Beyond". Garden History. 45: 82–100.  ^ Clarke, John M. (2006). The Brookwood Necropolis Railway, Locomotive Press 143 (4th edition). The Orchard Press. p. 9. ISBN 978-0-85361-655-9.  ^ Arnold, Catherine (2006). Necropolis: London
London
and its dead. Simon & Schuster. p. 160. ISBN 978-1-4165-0248-7.  ^ a b The Brookwood Necropolis Railway. p. 11.  ^ Glen, William Cunningham (1850). Metropolitan Interments Act, 1850, with introduction, notes, and appendix. London: Shaw and Sons. OCLC 19522913.  ^ "Dissenters' Chapel", Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery. ^ a b c [1] Dr Tony Shaw's website ^ The Friends of Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery. ^ CWGC Cemetery Report. ^ CWGC Debt of Honour Register. ^ Remembering Frederick Scott Archer
Frederick Scott Archer
BBC article, 27 April 2010 ^  Boase, George Clement (1896). "Quin, Frederic Hervey Foster". In Lee, Sidney. Dictionary of National Biography. 47. London: Smith, Elder & Co. ... and was buried in Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery on 28 Nov.  ^ W. B. Owen, revised by H. C. G. Matthew, 'Reich, Emil (1854–1910)', in Oxford Dictionary of National Biography
Dictionary of National Biography
(Oxford University Press, 2004) online version (subscription required), accessed 26 September 2013 ^ Basu, Shrabani (26 July 2009). "Rebel With a Cause". The Telegraph. 

External links[edit]

Wikimedia Commons has media related to Kensal Green
Kensal Green
Cemetery.

Official website Friends of the Cemetery. Cemeteries of Britain. Recent photos (including the 2007 openday) and information Aerial view from 1928, from the English Heritage "Britain from Above" archive

v t e

Cemeteries in London

Cemeteries

Beckenham Bell's Hill Burial Ground Brockley and Ladywell Bunhill Fields Camberwell Charlton City of London Croydon East Finchley East London Golders Green Jewish Greenwich Great Northern Gunnersbury Hampstead Hanwell (Kensington's) Hanwell (Westminster's) Hither Green Isleworth Lambeth New Southgate Paddington Plumstead Putney Vale Queen's Road Richmond St Mary's Catholic St Pancras and Islington Southgate Trent Park West Ham Jewish Willesden Jewish Woolwich

The Magnificent Seven

Abney Park Brompton Highgate East and West Kensal Green Nunhead Tower Hamlets West Norwood

Former cemeteries

All Hallows Bread Street All Hallows Lombard Street All Hallows Staining Cross Bones East Greenwich Pleasaunce Enon Chapel Holy Trinity the Less Holy Trinity, Minories Quaker Gardens St Alban, Wood Street St Alphage London
London
Wall St Andrew St Antholin St Botolph's Aldgate St Dionis Backchurch St Matthew Friday Street St Helen's Bishopsgate St James Duke's Place St John the Evangelist St John Zachary St Katherine St Leonard, Eastcheap St Martin Outwich St Martin Pomary St Martin Vintry St Mary Aldermanbury St Mary Colechurch St Mary Magdalen St Mary Somerset St Mary Woolchurch Haw St Mary Woolnoth St Michael Queenhithe St Michael, Cornhill St Mildred, Poultry St Olave St Peter le Poer St Peter, Paul's Wharf St Sepulchre

Crematoria

City of London Croydon Golders Green West London West Norwood

Coordinates: 51°31′43″N 0°13′27″W / 51.5286°N 0.2241°W

.